Ohio tween workshop
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Ohio tween workshop

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power point from May 2013 workshop

power point from May 2013 workshop

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    Ohio tween workshop Ohio tween workshop Presentation Transcript

    • Creating and Sustaining Readers Teri S. Lesesne Sam Houston State University Department of Library Science
    • Here is the real problem… People are so desperate to raise test scores that we could well end up with anation full of kids who can pass tests but can neither read critically nor enjoy the act of reading itself. P. David Pearson February 2003
    • Some Important Notes Twitter  @professornana Email  terilesesne@gmail.com YAPP  http://my.yapp.us/CA8H6B
    • http://my.yapp.us/CA8H6B
    • Why Naked Reading? A naked child A drive with an author Some great research findings A late night inspiration
    • The naked child in question
    • A drive with an author
    • The research? Vickey Giles, 2006 Karen Sue Gibson, 2003 Replicating Livaudais, 1982
    • The questions? What could someone do BEFORE you read to make you WANT/HATE to read? What could someone do AFTER you read to make you WANT/HATE to read?
    • The late night inspiration? T-A-R-G-E-T
    • T-A-R-G-E-T TRUST ACCESS RESPONSE GUIDANCE ENTHUSIASM TWEEN AND TEEN APPEAL
    • Starting with the Basics
    • • a happy memory from when you were 10 years old• a sad memory from when you were 11 years old•an embarrassing memory from when you were 12years old• a great memory from when you were 13 years old•a “traumatic” memory from when you were 14 yearsold
    • How different were your memoriesfrom the person next to you? Theymay have been very different orthere may have been somesimilarities.
    • Defining Tweens Tweens is a fluid definition  meaning that different cognitive, emotional, and social developments happen at different rates in different adolescents. Some 10 year olds may have begun physically developing while others may not see these changes until they are 13. Anderson, 2007
    • Some Physical Basics Tweens and early teens are being bombarded by hormones and begin to develop reproductively (i.e. breasts, pubic hair, etc.)* Many experience a growth surge. Guys get taller, and girls get rounder. Many experience a hormonal rollercoaster – becoming moody and seemingly different over night. Pruitt, 1999
    • Some Psychological Basics Their reasoning capabilities rise to new levels of complexity. The adolescent is learning how to handle adult responsibilities. By age 12, he or she will be able to think about possibilities, consider hypotheses, think ahead, consider the thought process, and think beyond conventional limits. Pruitt, 1999
    • More Psychological Basics Increased ability to use abstract verbal concepts. Increased ability to engage in abstract thought to engage in issues like politics, religion and morality. During the middle school years, moral development continues to evolve as the adolescent becomes more aware the relationship between the individual and society. Pruitt, 1999
    • Social Development Basics  Expected increase in freedom  Move away from family toward peers  Likely to have best friends of the similar social and ethnic backgrounds.  In 7th grade, the above holds true PLUS they want friends with similar attitudes and values.  Peer approval and acceptance grows more important. Pruitt, 1999
    • Social Development Basics  Rely on friends for everything from companionship to understanding.  In middle school, the more a child is pressured by peers, the greater the chance he or she will go along or join in. Pruitt, 1999
    •  Anderson, S. (2007). Serving young teens and „tweens. Westport, CT: Libraries Unlimited. American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. (1999). Your adolescent: Emotional, behavioral, and cognitive development from early adolescence through the teen years. New York: Harper Collins. Zuckerman, D. (2001). When little girls become women: Early onset of puberty in girls. The Ribbon, 6(1).
    • So… List at least 2 ways you believe tweens and teens are different. How do these differences, then, affect what you will do in terms of meeting those differences?
    • CREATING AND SUSTAININGREAD ALOUD IN LISTEN TO AUDIOBOOKSEXCITING VOICE
    • CREATING AND SUSTAININGMEET THE AUTHOR “SPECIALIZE” IN AUTHOR
    • CREATING AND SUSTAININGLET ME PICK ANY BOOK I USE READING LADDERSLIKE TO HELP THEM DEVELOP
    • CREATING AND SUSTAININGHAVE A CLASSROOM TAKE THEM TO THELIBRARY LIBRARY
    • CREATING AND SUSTAINING  http://professornana. livejournal.com/  http://tinyurl.com/ dlelccSEE THE MOVIE BASED HAVE THEM CREATEON THE BOOK BOOK TRAILERS
    • CREATING AND SUSTAININGREADING BOOKS WITH STUDYING GNs andPICTURES IN THEM MANGA
    • The questions? What could someone do BEFORE you read to make you WANT/HATE to read? What could someone do AFTER you read to make you WANT/HATE to read?
    • What could someone do to make you want to read BEFORE you read? K-12  Being allowed to choose any book you want to read
    • What could someone do to makeyou want to read BEFORE you read? K-12  Having a classroom library
    • How does this translate to thepublic library? Displays Separate section for tweens Carts or trucks or stacks reserved for tweens Ideas?
    • Why is this important?
    • What could someone do to make you want to read BEFORE you read? K-12 Having the teacher read a book or chapter a day
    • Include read alouds as part of book talks
    • It takes minutes
    • What could someone do to make you want to read BEFORE you read? K-12 Having the teacher take you to the library
    • PL Translation? Visit the school with library card applications. Invite the class to come to the library on a field trip. Host a teacher night and present all you can provide for them. Do the same for parents.
    • Why the library?
    • Translation for PL? SRP  Research shows slump during summer can be ameliorated by kids reading books over vacation. Need circ stats that show how kids are accessing PL.
    • What could someone do to makeyou want to read BEFORE you read? 6-12  Meeting the author
    • In person or via Skype
    • Father-Son effort
    • What could someone do to makeyou want to read BEFORE you read? 6-12 Seeing the movie or television production of a book.
    • Compare books to movies
    • What could someone do to make you want to read BEFORE you read? 6-12 Being allowed to read books with lots of pictures in them.
    • PSB for Older Readers
    • Tiny Lessons
    • Classics
    • Graphic Novels
    • T-A-R-G-E-TING READERS
    • WE NEED TO BE THE EXPERTS OR WE RUN THE RISKOF PROGRAMS TAKING OVER
    • 63
    • 5th gradeRank Boys Girls Both Level1 WIMPY WIMPY WIMPY 5.22 WIMPY WIMPY WIMPY3 WIMPY WIMPY WIMPY4 HA TCHET NUMBER NUMBER 4.5 5.9 STARS STARS5 NUMBER TWILIGHT HATCHET STARS 5.7 64
    • 6TH GRADERANK BOYS GIRLS BOTH LEVEL1 WIMPY TWILIGHT WIMPY2 WIMPY NEW MOON WIMPY3 WIMPY ECLIPSE TWILIGHT4 HATCHET WIMPY WIMPY5 NUMBER BREAKING HATCHET STARS DAWN 65
    • 7TH GRADERANK BOYS GIRLS BOTH LEVEL1 OUTSIDERS TWILIGHT TWILIGHT2 WIMPY NEW MOON NEW MOON3 WIMPY ELCIPSE ECLIPSE4 GIVER BREAKING BREAKING DAWN DAWN5 TWILIGHT OUTSIDERS OUTSIDERS 66
    • 8TH GRADERANK BOYS GIRLS BOTH LEVEL1 OUTSIDERS TWILIGHT TWILIGHT2 GIVER NEW MOON NEW MOON3 TWILIGHT ECLIPSE ECLIPSE4 NEW MOON BREAKING BREAKING DAWN DAWN5 WIMPY OUTSIDERS OUTSIDERS 67
    • TRUST means knowing thebooks they need and want
    • TRUST
    • A is for ACCESS
    • ACCESS
    • Accessing Archetypes
    • R IS FOR RESPONSE
    • Response
    • GUIDANCE
    • Nonfiction Reading Ladder Historical Horizontal
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    • E IS FOR ENTHUSIASM
    • ENTHUSIASM
    • TWEEN AND TEEN APPEAL
    • Tween Appeal
    • WHAT WE HOPE TO DO:
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    • TO DO THIS:
    • NEW RULES You have the right to read the last chapter first. You have the right to read the last chapter first and then put the book back on the shelf. You have the right to refuse to read any book where you dont like the picture of the author.
    • NEW RULES You have the right to ignore all critics. You have the right to read the book spine of the person sitting next to you, even on a plane. And if you cant make it out, you have the right to ASK. You have the right to stop reading a book whenever you decide its not worth the effort, or that you simply dont like it. You have the right to refuse to read any book anyone else picks out for you. Even if its a birthday present. 122
    • NEW RULES You have the right to ignore all of these rules and do whatever you please as long as its civil. When you find that youre dawdling on your way back to a book, ditch it. 123
    • Finally… You have the right to read a book and not take a test or create a diorama or write a report or do ANYthing. 124
    • ACCEPT THE CHALLENGE AND