0
Making the Match
Teri S. Lesesne
(rhymes with insane)
@professornana

Building community
Reading aloud
Offering choice in reading material
Authentic literature
Real response
What are so...

 The Research Base
 Donalyn Miller
 Richard Allington
 Becoming a Nation of Readers
 NCTE and IRA Joint Statement o...

Importance of community
Via Donalyn Miller

Community Leaders
Via Donalyn Miller

 Teacher as reader
 Access to books (literally and then on higher level)
 Choice
 Opportunities to talk about books ...

Teacher as Reader
 Newbery for 2014?  Printz?

Access to Books
 Access also means a
range of books kids can
and will understand
 Range of genres
 Range of forms and...

Choice in Reading

Forms, formats, genres

 Beyond book reports and dioramas
 Peck’s Questions
 Student as Leader of Discussion: DIR (Terry Ley)
Book Talk/Confe...

Finding the Time
 Edge time (Donalyn
Miller) Fringe Time (me)
 Priority time
 Class time
12

Edge Time
 Reading on the fringes
 Appointments
 Bathroom books
 Car
 Purse or bookbag
 Phone books
 eBooks and a...

Priority Time
If it is not a priority for us, how can we
expect it to be a priority for them?
Take a moment to jot dow...

Class Time
15

Finding Time to Read
 Average person can
read 300 words per
minute
 In one week, that is
31,500 words
 In one year, i...

17
18

Comprehension and Collaboration
1. Prepare for and participate effectively in a range of conversations and collaboration...
Read alouds beyond primary grades
This read aloud brought to you by Mo Willems
“Once upon a time there were three dinosaurs: Papa Dinosaur,
Mama Dinosaur, a...

What does the opening
sentence tell readers?
 Setting
 Main characters
 Motif
 Archetype
 And…it’s going to be
funn...
Brought to you by Charles Benoit
Opening lines
You’re surprised at all the blood.
He looks at you, eyes wide, mouth dropping
Open, his face almost as white as his shirt....

In two paragraphs, what do
we learn?
 Simile and metaphor
 Strong verbs
 Use of second person
 How details contribut...

 Closes achievement gap since students can generally
listen above their reading comprehension level.
 Offers model of ...

Offering choices
Ensuring that choices reflect developmental
needs of kids
Books as mirrors
Books as windows
Widenin...

Extensive vs. Intensive
 Extensive
 Central text
 Shorter selections to
accompany central text
 Different genres, fo...

 Kids read more
 Kids performed as well on tests at the end of the unit
of study
 Kids’ attitudes toward books and re...

Example of a Model
Framework
Core text

Add to Core Text
Informational
 Advances in cancer
treatment
 Cancer in teens
 Side effects of cancer
treatments
 Se...

Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
7. Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse formats and
media, including v...

Note on range and content of student reading
To become college and career ready, students must grapple with works of exc...

 Quantitative Measures
 Lexile
 Reading level(s)
 Qualitative Measures
 Levels of Meaning
 Narrative structure
 L...

 Reading levels
 Syllables
 Sentences
 Lexile Levels
 Syllables
 Sentences
 Semantics
 Syntax
 All of these rat...

Higher or Lower?

Guess Again!
4.8 790 4.0 680

Higher or Lower?

Hmmm….
5.7 920 5.7 960

Higher or Lower?

Guess again!
5.7 990 5.9 850

Higher or Lower

Guess again!
n/a 620 4.1 630

One More Time

Huh?
4.2 5.0

Qualitative measures complement
quantitative measures:
Purpose
Language conventionality and clarity
Text structures
...
 Narrative structure
 Shifts in time (flashback and foreshadowing)
 Point of view (multiple narrators, unreliable narr...

 Personal/Emotive
 What is your gut reaction to the text?
 Interpretive
 If you were one of the characters, what wou...
Using the resources we have at our fingertips
&
Not all these formulaic means

 Where do we go to get ideas about what to read?
 How can we narrow it down from the 7500+ books
published annually?
...

 Lists
 Awards lists
 Newbery
 Printz
 Starred Review lists
 Teens Top Ten
Where to get
recommendations?

 BFYA
 QP
 Notables
 Orbis Pictus
 Sibert
 YALSA Excellence in Nonfiction
 Morris
 Great Graphic Novels for Teen...

 Narrative Structure
 Simple vs. complex
 Explicit vs. implicit
 Chronological vs. non-linear
Qualitative

Narrative Structure

 Language conventionality and clarity
 Dialect
 Conversational
 Rich
 Vivid
Qualitative

Language Usage

 Knowledge demands
 Sophisticated themes
 Experience and perspective (close reading conflict)
 Context
 Social mili...


What we want are
lifelong readers and
learners…

Because this is not the
problem…

This is…
C C S S and Best Practices L S U
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C C S S and Best Practices L S U

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Power point from the works for the LSU YA Lit Conference June 2, 2014

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Transcript of "C C S S and Best Practices L S U"

  1. 1. Making the Match Teri S. Lesesne (rhymes with insane) @professornana
  2. 2.  Building community Reading aloud Offering choice in reading material Authentic literature Real response What are some of our best (research-based) practices?
  3. 3.   The Research Base  Donalyn Miller  Richard Allington  Becoming a Nation of Readers  NCTE and IRA Joint Statement on what adolescent deserve  ASCD  Yankelovich  Penny Little  Kelly Gallagher Community in the Classroom
  4. 4.  Importance of community Via Donalyn Miller
  5. 5.  Community Leaders Via Donalyn Miller
  6. 6.   Teacher as reader  Access to books (literally and then on higher level)  Choice  Opportunities to talk about books and reading  Time to read Building Community
  7. 7.  Teacher as Reader  Newbery for 2014?  Printz?
  8. 8.  Access to Books  Access also means a range of books kids can and will understand  Range of genres  Range of forms and formats
  9. 9.  Choice in Reading
  10. 10.  Forms, formats, genres
  11. 11.   Beyond book reports and dioramas  Peck’s Questions  Student as Leader of Discussion: DIR (Terry Ley) Book Talk/Conferring
  12. 12.  Finding the Time  Edge time (Donalyn Miller) Fringe Time (me)  Priority time  Class time 12
  13. 13.  Edge Time  Reading on the fringes  Appointments  Bathroom books  Car  Purse or bookbag  Phone books  eBooks and audiobooks 13
  14. 14.  Priority Time If it is not a priority for us, how can we expect it to be a priority for them? Take a moment to jot down one time you will set aside daily (just 5 minutes) to read. Make this commitment real by adding it to your calendar. 14
  15. 15.  Class Time 15
  16. 16.  Finding Time to Read  Average person can read 300 words per minute  In one week, that is 31,500 words  In one year, it is 1,512,000 words  Average book is 75,000 words  Can read +20 books a year with only 15 minutes a day  More than 1000 extra books in a lifetime 16
  17. 17.  17
  18. 18. 18
  19. 19.  Comprehension and Collaboration 1. Prepare for and participate effectively in a range of conversations and collaborations with diverse partners, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively. 2. Integrate and evaluate information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally. 3. Evaluate a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric. Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas 4. Present information, findings, and supporting evidence such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. 5. Make strategic use of digital media and visual displays of data to express information and enhance understanding of presentations. 6. Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and communicative tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate. How does community assist us with CCSS?
  20. 20. Read alouds beyond primary grades
  21. 21. This read aloud brought to you by Mo Willems “Once upon a time there were three dinosaurs: Papa Dinosaur, Mama Dinosaur, and some other Dinosaur who happened to be visiting from Norway.”
  22. 22.  What does the opening sentence tell readers?  Setting  Main characters  Motif  Archetype  And…it’s going to be funny! Plus it addresses this CCSS (anchor standard): Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences
  23. 23. Brought to you by Charles Benoit Opening lines
  24. 24. You’re surprised at all the blood. He looks at you, eyes wide, mouth dropping Open, his face almost as white as his shirt. He’s surprised, too. There’s not a lot of broken glass, though, just some tiny slivers around his feet and one big piece busted into sharp peaks like a spiking line graph, the blood washing down it like rain on a windshield.
  25. 25.  In two paragraphs, what do we learn?  Simile and metaphor  Strong verbs  Use of second person  How details contribute to overall effect CCSS Anchor Standards for Reading: 4. Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone. 5. Analyze the structure of texts, including how specific sentences, paragraphs, and larger portions of the text (e.g., a section, chapter, scene, or stanza) relate to each other and the whole. 6. Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the content and style of a text.
  26. 26.   Closes achievement gap since students can generally listen above their reading comprehension level.  Offers model of fluency and prosody.  Serves to assist with listening and speaking elements of CCSS.  Motivates K-12 to read and read more. (research) Why read aloud?
  27. 27.  Offering choices Ensuring that choices reflect developmental needs of kids Books as mirrors Books as windows Widening the curriculum to narrow the gap
  28. 28.  Extensive vs. Intensive  Extensive  Central text  Shorter selections to accompany central text  Different genres, forms, and formats CCSS calls this model framework  Intensive (not to be confused with close reading)  Focus on one text  Dissect it
  29. 29.   Kids read more  Kids performed as well on tests at the end of the unit of study  Kids’ attitudes toward books and reading was higher  Research covers 1940s forward Extensive research
  30. 30.  Example of a Model Framework Core text
  31. 31.  Add to Core Text Informational  Advances in cancer treatment  Cancer in teens  Side effects of cancer treatments  Self help groups  Biographies of reclusive authors Literary  Catcher in the Rye  “Death Be not Proud” (poem)  Other Printz award winners  Short story collections with YA authors And now the MOVIE!
  32. 32.  Integration of Knowledge and Ideas 7. Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse formats and media, including visually and quantitatively, as well as in words.* 8. Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, including the validity of the reasoning as well as the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence. 9. Analyze how two or more texts address similar themes or topics in order to build knowledge or to compare the approaches the authors take. Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity 10. Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and proficiently. How this aligns to CCSS
  33. 33.  Note on range and content of student reading To become college and career ready, students must grapple with works of exceptional craft and thought whose range extends across genres, cultures, and centuries. Such works offer profound insights into the human condition and serve as models for students’ own thinking and writing. Through wide and deep reading of literature and literary nonfiction of steadily increasing sophistication, students gain a reservoir of literary and cultural knowledge, references, and images; the ability to evaluate intricate arguments; and the capacity to surmount the challenges posed by complex texts. CCSS
  34. 34.   Quantitative Measures  Lexile  Reading level(s)  Qualitative Measures  Levels of Meaning  Narrative structure  Language Conventionality and Clarity  Knowledge Demands What qualities are essential?
  35. 35.   Reading levels  Syllables  Sentences  Lexile Levels  Syllables  Sentences  Semantics  Syntax  All of these rate only how students perform on tests Problems with Quantitative Analysis of Books
  36. 36.  Higher or Lower?
  37. 37.  Guess Again! 4.8 790 4.0 680
  38. 38.  Higher or Lower?
  39. 39.  Hmmm…. 5.7 920 5.7 960
  40. 40.  Higher or Lower?
  41. 41.  Guess again! 5.7 990 5.9 850
  42. 42.  Higher or Lower
  43. 43.  Guess again! n/a 620 4.1 630
  44. 44.  One More Time
  45. 45.  Huh? 4.2 5.0
  46. 46.  Qualitative measures complement quantitative measures: Purpose Language conventionality and clarity Text structures Knowledge demands Qualitative Measures
  47. 47.  Narrative structure  Shifts in time (flashback and foreshadowing)  Point of view (multiple narrators, unreliable narrator)  Language  Figurative devices  Irony  Parody  Knowledge Demands  Cultural  intertextuality Translation
  48. 48.   Personal/Emotive  What is your gut reaction to the text?  Interpretive  If you were one of the characters, what would you have done differently?  Critical  How does the author demonstrate her or his craft?  Evaluative  What makes this a “good” or “bad” book? Levels of Response
  49. 49. Using the resources we have at our fingertips & Not all these formulaic means
  50. 50.   Where do we go to get ideas about what to read?  How can we narrow it down from the 7500+ books published annually?  How can we determine which books for which kids?  How do we then provide proof of rigor? Conventional Wisdom
  51. 51.   Lists  Awards lists  Newbery  Printz  Starred Review lists  Teens Top Ten Where to get recommendations?
  52. 52.   BFYA  QP  Notables  Orbis Pictus  Sibert  YALSA Excellence in Nonfiction  Morris  Great Graphic Novels for Teens  Stonewall But also…
  53. 53.   Narrative Structure  Simple vs. complex  Explicit vs. implicit  Chronological vs. non-linear Qualitative
  54. 54.  Narrative Structure
  55. 55.   Language conventionality and clarity  Dialect  Conversational  Rich  Vivid Qualitative
  56. 56.  Language Usage
  57. 57.   Knowledge demands  Sophisticated themes  Experience and perspective (close reading conflict)  Context  Social milieu Qualitative
  58. 58.
  59. 59.  What we want are lifelong readers and learners…
  60. 60.  Because this is not the problem…
  61. 61.  This is…
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