Chapter two the audience spectators and participants power point

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Chapter two the audience spectators and participants power point

  1. 1. Chapter 2
  2. 2.  Theatre as a metaphor for daily life  Melodramatic  Highly theatrical  Prima donna  Play-acting Theatreis an activity that we use to describe how we live © 2013 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 2
  3. 3.  TVshows reflect comic traditions, techniques, characters, and structures developed in theatre  Daytime soap operas  Nighttime situation comedies  Hospital and police shows  Variety shows  News documentaries © 2013 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 3
  4. 4.  Theatrical genres and specific plays have been appropriated by film  Dreamgirls  Hairspray  Mamma Mia! © 2013 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 4
  5. 5.  Most film genres borrow from past theatrical traditions  Harry Potter  Batman Early theatrical audiences were often obsessed with theatrical stars Many film stars began their careers in theatre Movie and TV stars perform onstage © 2013 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 5
  6. 6.  Rock stars often use theatrical comparisons to defend their work  Lady Gaga Rock stars create theatrical characters by using:  Costumes  Props  Makeup © 2013 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 6
  7. 7.  Rock stars often act in films and in theatre  Elvis Presley  The Beatles  Madonna  Mark Wahlberg  Ice T  Tupac Shakur  Eminem © 2013 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 7
  8. 8.  Concerts are highly theatrical events Music videos are theatrical  Narratives of videos are visual and dramatic © 2013 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 8
  9. 9.  Rock is used as the score for musicals  Mamma Mia!  Lennon  All Shook Up  Good Vibrations  Jersey Boys  Jukebox Journey © 2013 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 9
  10. 10.  Amusement parks present staged productions based on films Rides incorporate theatricality  ET  Raiders of the Lost Ark  Twilight Zone: Tower of Terror © 2013 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 10
  11. 11.  Restaurants with theatricalized environments  Rainforest Café Shopping centers and specialty stores with theatricalized environments  Niketown  American Girl © 2013 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 11
  12. 12. © 2013 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 12
  13. 13.  Museums with stage presentations and exhibits that function like stage settings Dinner theatres Sports events function like theatre spaces © 2013 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 13
  14. 14. © 2013 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 14
  15. 15.  Many of the storylines in digital entertainment present a theatrical plotline Theatrical role-playing websites © 2013 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 15
  16. 16.  Differences between Theatre-Related Activities and Theatre Itself  Recorded performances lack performer- audience interaction  Musical performances, half-time shows, etc. are live performances but make no pretense of dramatic production © 2013 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 16
  17. 17.  How the Audience Participates © 2013 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 17
  18. 18.  Diversity of Audiences  Makeup of Audiences: Past and Present  Where We See Theatre  Audiences Today: Multicultural and Diverse © 2013 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 18
  19. 19. © 2013 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 19
  20. 20.  Preparing for Criticism Criteria for Criticism  What is the playwright or production attempting to do?  How well has it been done?  Is it worth doing? © 2013 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 20
  21. 21.  Decline of Critics’ and Reviewers’ Influence The Audience Member’s Independent Judgment © 2013 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 21

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