Chapter 24   the persuasive speech
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Chapter 24 the persuasive speech

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Bibliography: O’ Hair, Dan, Stewart, Rob, Rubenstein, Hannah, A Speaker’s Guidebook, Bedford St. Martin (2009)

Bibliography: O’ Hair, Dan, Stewart, Rob, Rubenstein, Hannah, A Speaker’s Guidebook, Bedford St. Martin (2009)

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Chapter 24   the persuasive speech Chapter 24 the persuasive speech Presentation Transcript

  • Chapter 24 The Persuasive Speech Professor Tonya Seavers Evans
  • What is the persuasive speech?
    • Goal is to:
      • Influence an audience’s beliefs or understanding about something.
      • Influence an audience’s behavior.
      • Reinforce audience members’ existing attitudes, beliefs, or behavior so they will continue to possess or practice them.
  • Classical Persuasive Appeals
    • Aristotle explained that persuasion could be brought about by the speaker’s use of three types of persuasive appeals, or forms of rhetorical proofs.
    • The first is the message in the speech called logos.
    • The second, the nature of the audience’s feelings, called pathos.
    • The qualifications and personality of the speaker, called ethos.
  • Logos: Proof by Reason
    • Appeals directed at the audience’s reasoning on the topic
    • To reason is to draw conclusions based on evidence.
    • Described two forms of reasoning of speeches: syllogism and enthymeme
  • Proof by Reason
    • Syllogism – A three part argument consisting of a general case or major premise, and a specific case or minor premise
    • The conclusion derived from the first two steps
    • Based on deductive reasoning or reasoning from a general condition to a specific instance
    • Beware of hasty overgeneralizations
  • Proof by reason
    • Enthymeme – A syllogism is presented as a probability rather than as a an absolute, and it states either a general case or a specific case but not both.
    • Be sure to read the examples on page 379 for specifics.
  • Pathos: Proof by Emotion
    • Creating a certain disposition in the audience
    • You can evoke these emotions in a speech by using vivid descriptions and emotionally charged words
    • Use emotion to get the audience’s attention and stimulates a desire to act on the emotion
    • Reason is then presented as justification for the action
  • Ethos: Proof through Speaker’s Character
    • Emphasizes the nature of the speaker’s character and personality
    • Elements of persuasive appeal based on ethos:
      • Good sense. Knowledge of and experience with the subject matter.
      • Moral character. Reflected in the speaker’s straightforward and honest presentation of the message.
      • Goodwill toward the audience. Demonstrate an interest in and concern for the welfare of the audience.
  • Bibliography O’ Hair, Dan, Stewart, Rob, Rubenstein, Hannah, A Speaker’s Guidebook, Bedford St. Martin (2009)