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Chapter 12 Types of Organizational Arrangements Professor Tonya Seavers Evans
Organizational Arrangements <ul><li>You must decide on a type of organizational arrangement or combination of arrangements...
Types of Organizational Arrangements <ul><li>Topical </li></ul><ul><li>Chronological </li></ul><ul><li>Spatial </li></ul><...
Topical <ul><li>When each of the main points is a subtopic or category of the speech topic. </li></ul><ul><li>Ascending or...
Chronological <ul><li>Also called the temporal pattern </li></ul><ul><li>Follows the natural sequential order of the main ...
Spatial Pattern <ul><li>Speeches purpose is to describe or explain the physical arrangement of a place, a scene, or an obj...
Causal (Cause-Effect) Pattern <ul><li>Described as providing a cause and effect relationship </li></ul><ul><li>Goal is to ...
Problem-Solution Pattern <ul><li>Organizes main points both to demonstrate the nature and significance of a problem </li><...
Narrative Pattern <ul><li>The speech begins with a story or a series of short stories </li></ul><ul><li>Includes plot, set...
Circular Pattern <ul><li>Develops one idea, which leads to another, which leads to a third, etc. </li></ul><ul><li>Useful ...
Monroe’s Motivated Sequence <ul><li>A five step process that begins with arousing the listeners’ attention and ends with c...
Comparative Advantage <ul><li>Demonstrate how your viewpoint or proposal is superior to one or more alternative viewpoints...
Bibliography <ul><li>O’ Hair, Dan, Stewart, Rob, Rubenstein, Hannah,  A Speaker’s Guidebook , Bedford St. Martin (2009) Ha...
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Chapter 12 types of organizational arrangements

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SpeakO’ Hair, Dan, Stewart, Rob, Bibliography: Rubenstein, Hannah, A Speaker’s Guidebook, Bedford St. Martin (2009)er's Guidebook Course -

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Transcript of "Chapter 12 types of organizational arrangements"

  1. 1. Chapter 12 Types of Organizational Arrangements Professor Tonya Seavers Evans
  2. 2. Organizational Arrangements <ul><li>You must decide on a type of organizational arrangement or combination of arrangements for your speech. Choose one that your audience will easily understand and is best designed for your speeches purpose. </li></ul>
  3. 3. Types of Organizational Arrangements <ul><li>Topical </li></ul><ul><li>Chronological </li></ul><ul><li>Spatial </li></ul><ul><li>Cause (cause & effect) </li></ul><ul><li>Problem-Solution </li></ul><ul><li>Narrative </li></ul><ul><li>Circular </li></ul><ul><li>Monroe’s Motivated Sequence </li></ul><ul><li>Comparative Advantage </li></ul>
  4. 4. Topical <ul><li>When each of the main points is a subtopic or category of the speech topic. </li></ul><ul><li>Ascending or descending order of importance </li></ul><ul><li>Lead with your strongest evidence or leave your most compelling evidence to the end </li></ul><ul><li>Arrange by the audience’s most immediate needs or interest </li></ul>
  5. 5. Chronological <ul><li>Also called the temporal pattern </li></ul><ul><li>Follows the natural sequential order of the main points </li></ul><ul><li>Used for topics that describe a sequence of events </li></ul><ul><li>Used for topics that describe a series of sequential steps </li></ul>
  6. 6. Spatial Pattern <ul><li>Speeches purpose is to describe or explain the physical arrangement of a place, a scene, or an object </li></ul><ul><li>Main points are arranged in order of their physical proximity or direction relative to one another </li></ul><ul><li>Example: Tour of a particular place </li></ul>
  7. 7. Causal (Cause-Effect) Pattern <ul><li>Described as providing a cause and effect relationship </li></ul><ul><li>Goal is to communicate something known to be a “cause” to its “effects” </li></ul><ul><li>There could be multiple causes for a single effect (reasons for college drop out rates) </li></ul><ul><li>There could be a single cause with multiple effects (reasons students drop out of college) </li></ul>
  8. 8. Problem-Solution Pattern <ul><li>Organizes main points both to demonstrate the nature and significance of a problem </li></ul><ul><li>Provides justification for a proposed solution </li></ul><ul><li>This arrangement usually always requires more than two points to adequately explain the problem and provide viable solutions </li></ul>
  9. 9. Narrative Pattern <ul><li>The speech begins with a story or a series of short stories </li></ul><ul><li>Includes plot, setting, character, vivid imagery </li></ul><ul><li>This arrangement usually includes other organizational arrangements (Ex. Teen pregnancy) </li></ul><ul><li>Story telling must be backed up by clear thesis, a preview, well-organized main points and effective transitions </li></ul>
  10. 10. Circular Pattern <ul><li>Develops one idea, which leads to another, which leads to a third, etc. </li></ul><ul><li>Useful to help your listener understand your line of reasoning, particularly in a persuasive speech </li></ul><ul><li>Step one, results in step two, which results in step three and which leads back to your thesis </li></ul>
  11. 11. Monroe’s Motivated Sequence <ul><li>A five step process that begins with arousing the listeners’ attention and ends with calling for action. Very effective when you want the audience to do something </li></ul><ul><li>Step 1 Attention: Grab their attention by addressing core concerns (ex. Organ donations) </li></ul><ul><li>Step 2 Need: Clearly establish the need and describes the issues that need to be addressed </li></ul><ul><li>Step 3 Satisfaction: Offers the audience members a proposal to reinforce or change their attitudes, beliefs or values </li></ul><ul><li>Step 4 Visualization: Provide the audience with a vision of anticipated outcomes associated with the solution </li></ul><ul><li>Step 5 Action: Making a direct request of the audience. Call them to action. </li></ul>
  12. 12. Comparative Advantage <ul><li>Demonstrate how your viewpoint or proposal is superior to one or more alternative viewpoints or proposals </li></ul><ul><li>In general your audience recognizes the problem and understand that something needs to done </li></ul><ul><li>Favorably compare your solution to others </li></ul><ul><li>Assumes the audience is open to other solutions </li></ul>
  13. 13. Bibliography <ul><li>O’ Hair, Dan, Stewart, Rob, Rubenstein, Hannah, A Speaker’s Guidebook , Bedford St. Martin (2009) Hair, Dan, Stewart, </li></ul>
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