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Forrrester Resarch Investigacion Travel Web
 

Forrrester Resarch Investigacion Travel Web

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Forrrester Resarch Investigacion Travel Web Forrrester Resarch Investigacion Travel Web Presentation Transcript

  • June 14, 2006. Call in at 12:55 pm Eastern Time Henry H. Harteveldt Vice President & Principal Analyst Forrester Research Teleconference What Frustrates Consumers About Web Travel Planning, And How Travel Companies Can Fix It
  • Theme A better online planning experience can help the bottom line, too
  • How we know what we know
    • Online survey fielded in March 2006 to Forrester Research’s in-house “Ultimate Consumer Panel”
      • 2,468 responses — all leisure travelers
      • Weighted to reflect US adult population
    • Additional Forrester Research reports and data
  • US online leisure travelers average 4.4 trips/year Base: US online leisure travelers Source: Forrester’s NACTAS 2006 Q1 Ultimate Consumer Panel Travel Online Survey 57% 43% 1-3 leisure trips/year 4+ leisure trips/year
  • Regardless of trip frequency, two in three US online leisure travelers are socially/emotionally motivated 1-3 leisure trips/year 4+ leisure trips/year Base: US online leisure travelers Base: US online leisure travelers Source: Forrester’s NACTAS 2006 Q1 Ultimate Consumer Panel Travel Online Survey Entertainment 48% Career 35% Family 17% Entertainment 46% Family 20% Career 34%
  • Travelers rely on the Web to bring order to travel-planning chaos
    • Trip planning
    • Staying within budget
    • Sorting through the overabundance of brands, offers, products, and methods to buy travel
  • Researching and buying travel online: Good, not great
    • Travel is a complex product
    • Ample numbers of both frequent and infrequent travelers are frustrated with research and buying travel online
      • Change/cancellation fees and policies
      • Credit card security
      • Privacy policies
    • Travel companies have so focused on the “click to purchase” that we’ve forgotten what we need to do to get consumers to get comfortable and confident enough in the first place
  • The wide variety of trips that travelers take forces travel sites to offer mountains of different content Base: US online leisure travelers (multiple responses accepted) Source: Forrester’s NACTAS 2006 Q1 Ultimate Consumer Panel Travel Online Survey “ Which of the following types of leisure/personal trips did you take in the past 12 months?” What is needed to convince a traveler to “get up and go”?
  • Travelers look to the Web to get the “3 i’s” of travel: Ideas, inspiration, and information “ When researching or purchasing leisure/personal travel online, which of the following have you done in the past 12 months?” Base: US online leisure travelers (multiple responses accepted) Source: Forrester’s NACTAS 2006 Q1 Ultimate Consumer Panel Travel Online Survey
  • Agency and supplier sites can’t give bookers 100% of what they want to plan a trip, so they use other tools
    • General search is used by 32% of bookers who take 1-3 leisure trips/year, and 44% of bookers who take 4+ leisure trips/year
    • Special offer sites are used by 19% of bookers who take 4+ leisure trips/year
      • 9% of bookers who take 1-3 trips/year
    • Travel search (metasearch) is used by 15% of 4+ leisure trip bookers
      • 9% for bookers who take 1-3 trips/year
    Base: Sites/tools used by US leisure travel Bookers to research personal/leisure travel in past 12 months (multiple responses accepted) Source: Forrester’s NACTAS 2006 Q1 Ultimate Consumer Panel Travel Online Survey
  • Travelers seek context in order to make informed purchase decisions
    • In a highly entertainment-motivated society, the Web’s visual nature is perfect
      • Images infuse life, context, and excitement for destinations, activities, and products
    • Visual content drives purchase behavior
      • 35% of infrequent leisure travelers, and 40% of frequent travelers, say pictures of a destination help decide where and whether to visit
      • Even more use hotel/resort pictures to choose where to stay
    • Travelers want to know what’s available and what’s included
      • A significant number of Web travelers go online to learn about what amenities a supplier offers and whether or not they’re included in the tariff/price
  • Social computing replaces Web travelers’ use of professional resources for travel information
    • Destination reviews
    • Hotel reviews
    • Hotel ratings
    • Social computing has significant impact
      • Among travelers who used the Web to plan or book a hotel stay and consulted other traveler-written comments, 25% of infrequent travelers and 33% of frequent travelers changed their hotel stays because of what they read
    Base: US online leisure travelers who used the Internet to plan or book a hotel stay Source: Forrester’s NACTAS 2006 Q1 Ultimate Consumer Panel Travel Online Survey
  • Online travelers still research high-touch products online and buy them offline Percentage that researched each product online and bought it offline: Base: US online leisure travelers who purchased each type of product Source: Forrester’s NACTAS 2006 Q1 Ultimate Consumer Panel Travel Online Survey
  • Infrequent and frequent leisure travelers cite different reasons for abandoning Web sites
    • Infrequent (1-3 trips/year)
    • Greater comfort, confidence talking to a person
    • Wasn’t comfortable making a non-refundable purchase online
    • Wanted to pay for the product after using it, not before
    • Frequent (4+ trips/year)
    • Wanted to make a special request that couldn’t be accommodated online
    • Trip was too complex to buy online
    • Wanted to buy a product not sold online
    • Problems completing the purchase online
    • Wanted to get someone else’s opinion before buying
  • Travelers seek assistance online Percentage of Bookers who did the following while researching or purchasing travel online: Base: US online leisure Bookers (multiple responses accepted) Source: Forrester’s NACTAS 2006 Q1 Ultimate Consumer Panel Travel Online Survey
  • Travelers seek help most in the planning phase When in the purchasing process did you . . . Base: US online leisure Bookers who did each type of activity in the past 12 months Source: Forrester’s NACTAS 2006 Q1 Ultimate Consumer Panel Travel Online Survey
  • How much content must a travel site offer? Like Madonna, too much is never enough, and you need to evolve what you have
  • The 10 steps travel sites must take to improve the online planning experience (1 of 2)
    • Know your customers, their travel personas, and what types of trips they take
    • Make visual content prominent, and integrate it into the purchase process to aid in upselling and cross-selling
    • Integrate user-generated content into your site — and into PMS/CRS/GDS databases used by frontline staff and travel agencies
    • Rethink the way you present availability search results to provide useful context
    • Offer an internal keyword-based search engine — travelers are used to searching for things online
  • The 10 steps travel sites must take to improve the online planning experience (2 of 2)
    • Make sure access to your help section and links for click-to-call back and agent chat are prominent on descriptive pages as well as on transactional pages
    • Have the content that travelers need to go beyond the obvious. Use third-party content and tools that fill in gaps on your site where it doesn’t make sense to create it yourself
    • Let users store and retrieve information — and build on it, especially for complex products like packages and cruises
    • Use relevant, effective tools like RSS and podcasts so travelers can get the information they want
    • Employ technologies and applications like Ajax and “mash-ups” that support richer user experiences and let travelers maintain control of how they interact with your site
  • Mark your calendars
    • Forrester’s Consumer Forum 2006: Humanizing the Digital Experience
    • October 24-25, 2006
      • Palmer House Hilton, Chicago
    • Conference Host: Christine Spivey Overby , Principal Analyst
    • Speakers include:
      • James Skinner , Vice Chairman and CEO, McDonald’s
      • Roger C. Hochschild , President and COO, Discover Financial Services
      • Nicholas Negroponte , Co-Founder and Chairman, MIT Media Lab
      • Henry H. Harteveldt , Vice President, Forrester Research
      • Harley Manning , Vice President, Forrester Research
    • More information available at www.forrester.com/consumerforum2006
  • Thank you Henry H. Harteveldt +1 415/206-0889 [email_address] www.forrester.com