Ten principles for working in groups

10,576 views

Published on

Published in: Education, Technology
2 Comments
3 Likes
Statistics
Notes
No Downloads
Views
Total views
10,576
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
48
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
162
Comments
2
Likes
3
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • One great way to transition between ideas is to ask a question to get your audience involved. So here you could ask WHY students might be taught to work effectively in groups.
  • Talk about when they will work in groups in their industry…like FASHION Maybe even ask them when they think students will need these skillsPicture: http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2008/04/09/2212604.htm
  • Talk about when they will work in groups in their industry…like ANIMATIONPicture: http://pixarblog.blogspot.com/2011/02/animated-feature-symposium-photos.html
  • Talk about when they will work in groups in their industry…like CULINARYPicture: http://www.chef2chef.net/culinary-institute/the-art-institutes/atlanta-ga.html
  • Groups don’t always work…so next we can examine when is the best time to use them
  • Group work is pointless when it is something that everyone can “Google” and figure out in minutes. But if there are a variety of factors to consider, roles to play and solutions that could work, then group work is ideal!
  • We are social creatures AND many of us tend to learn better when we debate, discuss, or help others understand concepts. No need for FULL QUARTER group assignments to get group work benefits. Get them helping each other on understanding a project or concept. Then have them individually take a quiz or complete an assignment. If a group does well (you set the benchmark) as individuals, give them a small reward. Isn’t that what happens in real life? Only the reward might be a bonus, a contract or other big fish. Here it can be getting out of class a few minutes early or a few bonus points!
  • Think of any team…a kitchen crew, a surgery team or a sports team (choose your favorite). What do they have in common? One person can not effectively play all roles. Same for a college class team. Consider an assignment where there are several roles or skills students should possess. For example, most groups involve people who research, play devil’s advocate effectively, understand technology, are creative, and even have other skills like a strong understanding of legal or financial repercussions of ideas.
  • Finally, some advice from experts and students alike on working effectively in groups.
  • From Faculty Focus…http://www.facultyfocus.com/articles/online-education/how-to-design-effective-online-group-work-activities/
  • From Faculty Focus…http://www.facultyfocus.com/articles/online-education/how-to-design-effective-online-group-work-activities/
  • From Faculty Focus…http://www.facultyfocus.com/articles/online-education/how-to-design-effective-online-group-work-activities/
  • From Faculty Focus…http://www.facultyfocus.com/articles/online-education/how-to-design-effective-online-group-work-activities/
  • Here’s a good reference for some basic roles: http://www.abacon.com/commstudies/groups/roles.html
  • Ten principles for working in groups

    1. 1. Principles for Working in Groups<br />
    2. 2. WHY?<br />
    3. 3.
    4. 4.
    5. 5.
    6. 6. WHEN?<br />
    7. 7. When there is more than one solution<br />
    8. 8. When discussion will benefit them<br />
    9. 9. Different skill sets complement each other<br />
    10. 10. ADVICE from the Experts…Faculty Focus Magazine <br />And some of our students of course<br />
    11. 11. Online group work checklistPart 1: Preparation<br />Students understand the value of both the process and product of the collaboration. <br />Students have guidance concerning how to work in an asynchronous team. <br />Group size is small enough to allow for full participation of all members. <br />Course provides numerous opportunities for community building prior to group projects. <br />
    12. 12. Online group work checklist:Part 2: Assignment<br />Assignment is an authentic measure of student learning. <br />Assignment will benefit from collaborative work. <br />Students have clear guidelines of the expected outcome of the collaborative assignment. <br />Assignment creates a structure of positive interdependence in which individuals perceive thatthey will succeed when the group succeeds. <br />Assignment is scheduled to allow adequate time for preparation and communication. <br />Assignment is designed in a manner to allow students a level of personal control. <br />
    13. 13. Online group work checklist: Part 3: Technology<br />Students are provided with tools and instructions to facilitate online communication. <br />Each group has a collaborative workspace within the online course. <br />Students have technology skills relevant for asynchronous communication. <br />Back-up procedures are in place to deal with technology failure. <br />
    14. 14. Online group work checklist:Part 4: Evaluation<br />Grading and/or evaluation strategies differentiate between the process and the product. <br />Strategies are in place to monitor interaction processes. <br />Clear grading rubrics are provided at the start of the assignment to guide student work. <br />Self and peer evaluations are included in the process to monitor individual involvement andaccountability. <br />
    15. 15. Now a word from our students<br />
    16. 16. Give us some tool recommendations to help us meet out of class ~Josie<br />
    17. 17. Remind us to Always have two or more ways to contact each other~Juan<br />
    18. 18. Go over the roles. It helps to know if we are missing something.~Leslie<br />
    19. 19. Can we vote a member off the island or at least grade them if they aren't doing their work?~Jennifer<br />
    20. 20. Don’t put too many people in one group!~Tamara<br />
    21. 21. Remind us that the other person isn’t always the problem. ~jamaal<br />
    22. 22. Give us guidance on how to deal with “difficult member roles”.~Anonymous<br />
    23. 23. Can we have some benchmarks please? Don’t just throw is to the sharks! ~Maria<br />
    24. 24. Make certain we have enough time to get to know each other and complete the project!~Jon<br />
    25. 25. Davis, B.G. (1993). Tools for teaching. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass (Excerpt can be found here: http://teaching.berkeley.edu/bgd/collaborative.html)<br />Rothchild, J.D. (2010). In mixed company: Communicating in small groups and in teams/ Chapter Two: Groups as systems (7th ed.). Boston, MA: Wadsworth Publishing<br />The Faculty Focus Series: Download available for members here: http://www.facultyfocus.com/free-reports/effective-group-work-strategies-college-classroom/<br />Recommended Readings…<br />

    ×