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The Dirty Dozen Roadmap Roadblocks (Bruce McCarthy) ProductCamp Boston 2014
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The Dirty Dozen Roadmap Roadblocks (Bruce McCarthy) ProductCamp Boston 2014

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You’re about to show the product roadmap you’ve slaved over to your executives, your key customers or your sales team. What could possibly go wrong? …

You’re about to show the product roadmap you’ve slaved over to your executives, your key customers or your sales team. What could possibly go wrong?

In the sequel to the most popular session at PCamp Boston 2013, Bruce McCarthy, Chief Product Person at UpUp Labs, Vice President and Chief Evangelist for the BPMA, and popular speaker, will explore the myriad mistakes product people make when developing product roadmaps.

He’ll explore what happens when you:

* Focus on features
* Try too hard to please
* Don't get buy-in
* Prioritize on gut
* Fail to tell a story

And he'll tell you what you can do to avoid the dirty dozen roadmap roadblocks.

Published in: Business, News & Politics
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  • 1. The Dirty Dozen Roadmap Roadblocks Roadmapping 312 Bruce McCarthy Chief Product Person, Reqqs www.reqqs.com
  • 2. Bruce McCarthy
  • 3. What is a Roadmap?
  • 4. A good roadmap inspires
  • 5. It keeps you on course when storm clouds threaten
  • 6. “Is this more important than what’s already on the roadmap?”
  • 7. The Dirty Dozen 1. Being Too Agile 2. Prioritizing on Gut 3. Over- or Underestimating 4. No Strategic Goals 5. Inside-out Thinking 6. Trying Too Hard to Please 7. Focusing on Features 8. No Buffer 9. Playing Catch-up 10. Not Getting Buy-in 11. Being Too Secretive 12. One Size Fits All
  • 8. 1. Being Too Agile
  • 9. Dwight D. Eisenhower, 1957 “Plans are worthless, but planning is everything.”
  • 10. 2. Prioritizing on Gut
  • 11. Value / Effort = Priority
  • 12. Effort Value High High Low Low
  • 13. 3. Over- or Underestimating
  • 14. 4. No Strategic Goals
  • 15. Ask yourself: “Why are we doing this product in the first place?”
  • 16. Deriving Product Goals from Company Goals Improve Student Outcomes Serve Large Districts Improve Customer Satisfaction Increase New Sales & Yield Improve Engagemen t X X X Measure Usage X X Show Results X X X X
  • 17. 5. Inside-out Thinking
  • 18. A roadmap demonstrates your commitment to solving problems for a specific market
  • 19. 6. Trying Too Hard to Please
  • 20. Roadmaps are not a popularity contest
  • 21. 7. Focusing on Features
  • 22. Keep Things Simple High-level, few words "Streamlined workflow" > "fewer steps in the check-in, check- out process" Roll up details "Quicker access to your data" > a list of access points and time stats Make the benefit obvious "Match your branding" > "Support millions of colors."
  • 23. 8. No Buffer
  • 24. 9. Playing Catch-up
  • 25. 1. Be a category of one 2. Analyze your losses 3. Scare yourself
  • 26. 10. Not Getting Buy-in
  • 27. Shuttle diplomacy
  • 28. Eng UX Marketing Services Sales HR Finance BD Customers Partners Analysts Your Boss C-Suite Other PMsTech Lead Architects Legal
  • 29. 11. Being Too Secretive
  • 30. 12. One Size Fits All
  • 31. Roadmaps should come in flavors for different markets, but all made from the same basic ingredients
  • 32. 13. No Story
  • 33. Your roadmap should tell the story of how you will make people (and yourself) successful
  • 34. The Dirty Dozen 13. No story 1. Being Too Agile 2. Prioritizing on Gut 3. Over- or Underestimating 4. No Strategic Goals 5. Inside-out Thinking 6. Trying Too Hard to Please 7. Focusing on Features 8. No Buffer 9. Playing Catch-up 10. Not Getting Buy-in 11. Being Too Secretive 12. One Size Fits All
  • 35. H1‘14 H2’14 2015 2016 Benefit A Likely Feature 1 Likely Feature 2 Likely Feature 3 Benefit B Benefit D Benefit E, Phase II Benefit C Benefit E, Phase I Benefit F Weaselly Safe Harbor Statement Product X is focused on solving problem Y best for market Z
  • 36. H1‘14 H2’14 2015 2016 Indestruct- ible hose 20’ length Easy connections No-kink armor Delicate Flower Management Putting Green Evenness for Lawns Infinite Extensibility Severe Weather Handling Extended Reach Permanent Installations Weaselly Safe Harbor Statement The Wombat Garden Hose is focused on perfecting the landscapes of affluent Americans
  • 37. I Help Product People Team coaching via UpUp Labs Tools: Reqqs - the smart roadmap tool for product people Blog: ProductPowers.com Twitter: @d8a_driven Email: bruce@reqqs.com Want to chat?: sohelpful.me/brucemccarthy

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