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Communication The Key
Communication The Key
Communication The Key
Communication The Key
Communication The Key
Communication The Key
Communication The Key
Communication The Key
Communication The Key
Communication The Key
Communication The Key
Communication The Key
Communication The Key
Communication The Key
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Communication The Key

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Written by Lou Principe.

Written by Lou Principe.

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  • 1. Objections The key to a high closure rate is two-fold. You need to determine the prospects dominant buying motive and you need to resolve any real objections. You must ascertain what motivated the prospect to come out to your property in order to understand his psyche. Why would he spend a weekend looking at your product rather than play golf?
  • 2. He will probably spend more time driving to your property than he will in actual face-to-face interaction with you. A truly professional sales-person will become a friend to confide in and will have empathy with the prospect. A top- drawer professional must be able to get on the same side of the table with the prospect so that he can assist him in the purchase decision. You don’t sell anything to anybody; you help them realize why they should purchase and help them overcome their fears.
  • 3. To produce results, specific steps should be followed in the sales process. Retaining your prospect’s attention is your top priority. The number one opener should be a property introduction with a handshake. This custom is interpreted by both the salesperson and polite way of establishing a relationship. Remember your prospect’s name, and tell him yours. From this moment on, it is critical to refer to your prospect by his name at all times. You will receive an automatic, subconscious behavior response—his attention.
  • 4. Now you must be able to retain his attention, and create an interest, build a desire, convince the prospect that he cannot live without buying one of your homes. You must make him want to close. All of the communication with a prospect should have a definite plan and purpose toward your goal —having the prospect purchases your home. We need to know what to do and say in order to produce a controlled response. A controlled response is governed by a basic psychological principle that directs our behavior. Most people know very little about conditioned responses, making them vulnerable to anyone who knows how a conditioned response works. The regularity of success is startling because once understood, you are able to guide the prospect into the direction you want him to go, without him realizing that you are in control.
  • 5. After the initial introduction, you should obtain some common ground with your prospect in the shortest amount of time. You are not there to contest with him; you are there to identify his needs. The prospect has to realize why he is on your property. If you can put a finger on his needs, you are miles ahead in the selling process. There are millions of people out there whose needs haven’t been satisfied. Take the time to listen to them. Don’t be in such a rush to tell them about your product or hurry them off to tour the models and think that if they like what they see, they will buy. Create some meaningful communication with your prospect, and then take a specific sales approach.
  • 6. A salesperson is a fact gatherer. You should get to know as much as possible about your prospect. •Does he have any hobbies? •How old are his children? •Where does he presently live? •What sports team does he root for? •What does he do for a living? •When you tell your doctor that you care not feeling well, does he prescribe the same treatment for you as he just prescribed for the patient he saw before you? No, of course not. Not all of his patients have the same ailment. He asks questions to determine what the specific problem is.
  • 7. Salespeople are no different. You are a professional real estate doctor. Sit your “patient” down and find out his problems, his latest motivation for being in your office. Gather the facts. Only then, when you have all the facts, will you prescribe. Depending on the answers to your questions, you will know what specific path to take. Don’t be satisfied to know only that your prospect is currently renting; you need to know why he is renting. Understanding the prospect’s motivation and behavior enables you to carry out your job more efficiently.
  • 8. After you get all the facts, the success for your retaining their attention and interest depends solely upon what you can do for them. For example, perhaps your property is within walking distance to shopping and has a property maintenance program. If you are not able to interact properly with your prospect, perhaps you will never know that your 65 year old prospect doesn’t want to drive anymore and his chest hurts him when he mows the grass. Most likely, a prospect won’t confide his most personal thoughts to a stranger; he’s probably not even told his wife his real reason for looking for a new home. If you haven’t done your job thoroughly, he ends up being the person that says, “I’m just looking,” or “I’ll think about it.”
  • 9. The next step is to convince your prospect that he is doing the right thing, and until you do, he is going to keep his money in his wallet. Third party testimonials are the proof of the pudding right now. Have your prospect be assured that others have purchased and it has not only been their home, but their investment as well. A salesperson also needs to be aware of non-verbal communication: the study of facial expressions, touch, gestures, smell and eye behavior. Most non-verbal communication occurs unconsciously without a predictable sequence of events. Because there are no formal rules, you must be careful to look at all the available clues to interpret non-verbal messages correctly.
  • 10. The sales area itself should be arranged with the prospect’s comfort in mind. A desk is a barrier to open and frank discussions. Desk It exists in most sales offices today because of tradition. It’s a security blanket for the salesperson—his domain, his space. It does nothing for his prospect. It is not the salesperson who needs to have stage presence; you need to give stage presence to your prospect. You must make that person feel good, make him feel he is the center of attention, the most important person. Give him your undivided attention.
  • 11. In the sales process you should strive to get the maximum amount of comfortable transaction time for the limited amount of time that you spend with your prospect. The sales area should be perceived as an environment of warmth. Even the position of seating may determine the extent to which a salesperson interacts with his prospect in that particular setting. Lighting in the sales area, like color, also has a definite effect on behavior. Low lights tend to create a relaxed, intimate environment in which people want to linger. Bright lights tend to cause fatigue and a desire to escape.
  • 12. The biggest fault of most salespeople is that they are too busy talking about their product to listen and understand what the prospect is trying to say. When a prospect volunteers information, treasure it; they are reaching out to you —the professional—for help. Listen, understand, and communicate. Don’t compete with each other, but work in harmony and unity for the benefit of both.
  • 13. Written by: Lou Principe Lou@LouPrincipe.com PowerPoint by: April Williams keys9500@hotmail.com

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