10 Basic Principles for Rehabbing the Right Way

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These 10 principles should help make your historic rehabilitation a success.

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  • Great presentation! Thanks for sharing.
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  • Keeping the original purpose of the building in mind is the best way to make design choices. It doesn't necessarily have to be used for the same purpose as it was before, but incorporating some of the old into the new is a great way to give the building character.
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  • As a designer, I can attest to the power of restoration, not 'tear down and build from scratch.' You can do a lot with character. You can't do a lot with newer builds.
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  • I absolutely agree with all of your tenets! I especially love 'Preserve the character'. By following the bones or the style of a home, you can actually do less work with an outcome that is outstanding. Thanks for the slides. Great presentation!
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  • Hello, If you have a business deals or Projects and you need an investor to finance your business and makes it grow, then contact us . We also have a business proposal on mutual funds benefit for a reliable partners. Any interested persons or organizations should contact us on below email address for further details. Email: longchi.bm@gmail.com Thanks, Long Chi
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10 Basic Principles for Rehabbing the Right Way

  1. 1. 10 Basic Principles for REHABBING THE RIGHT WAY
  2. 2. 1. Consider its original purpose When possible, make every effort to use the building for its original purpose. If you can’t, make sure the new use requires minimal change to its historic features.
  3. 3. 2. Preserve its character. Identify those unique and historic elements that define the building’s character and make every effort to preserve and protect them. Do not remove or alter elements that are critical to maintaining the original historic fabric of the building.
  4. 4. 3. Buildings are a physical record. Recognize that all buildings are physical products of their time. Avoid changes that may create a false sense of historical development.
  5. 5. 4. Respect changes. Respect and retain changes to the property that have occurred over time and have acquired historic significance in their own right.
  6. 6. 5. Save distinct materials and features. Carefully save and preserve the distinct materials, features, finishes, and examples of craftsmanship that characterize the property.
  7. 7. 6. Repair, not replace. Whenever possible, repair—rather than replace—deteriorated historic elements. When replacement is necessary, new materials should match the old in design, composition, and color.
  8. 8. 7. Clean facades gently. Avoid sandblasting and other damaging processes, and always test materials first (especially with chemical or physical treatments).
  9. 9. 8. Preserve archeological areas. Keep surrounding archeological areas intact. However, if an area must be disturbed, take every step necessary to mitigate harm.
  10. 10. 9. Make compatible alterations. Compatible, contemporary alterations are acceptable if they do not destroy significant historical or architectural fabric.
  11. 11. 10. Build removable additions. Build new additions so they can be removed without impairing the underlying structure.
  12. 12. The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America’s historic places. Preservation Tips & Tools helps others do the same in their own communities. For more information, visit SavingPlaces.org. Photos courtesy: SDOT Photos/Flickr/CC BY-NC 2.0; Onasill ~ Bill Badzo ~ OFF UNTIL STATS ARE WORKING/Flickr/CC BY-SA 2.0; Wally Gobetz/Flickr/CC BY-NC-ND-2.0; NCinDC/Flickr/CC BY-ND; Jay Galvin/Flickr/CC BY-2.0; takomabibelot/Flickr/CC BY-2.0; Gary Lloyd-Rees/Flickr/CC BY-NC 2.0; Bob Marquart/Flickr/CC BY-NC 2.0; Odense Bys Musser/Flickr/CC BY-SA 2.0; Brent Moore/Flickr/CC BY NC; 2.0; Ben Pugh/Flickr/CC- BY-2.0; William Murphy/Flickr/CC-BY-SA 2.0

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