Workers Comp Benchmarking Analysis

4,617 views

Published on

Case study of workers compensation experience compared to SIC benchmark statistics. Also includes an examination of the NCCI experience mod and its impact on premium.

Published in: Business
1 Comment
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
4,617
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
7
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
84
Comments
1
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Workers Comp Benchmarking Analysis

  1. 1.   Case Study   Manufacturing  2010    SAFETY AND HEALTH STATISTICS BENCHMARKING ANALYSIS  WORKERS’ COMPENSATION EXPERIENCE MOD EXAMINATION    PREPARED BY:  JOHN C. KELLER, CRM ARM CIC AAI  RISK MANAGEMENT CONSULTANT  Results Praxiom Risk Management LLC  809 E. Bloomingdale Ave., #300  Brandon, FL 33511   
  2. 2. Case Study ‐ Manufacturing  Safety and Health Benchmarking Analysis  Table of Contents      Introduction  3      Safety and Health Benchmarking Analysis  4      WC Experience Modification Rate (EMR) Examination  10      Total Cost of WC Accidents  15      Conclusion  17      Appendix  18    Page 2 of 18
  3. 3. Case Study ‐ Manufacturing  Safety and Health Benchmarking Analysis  INTRODUCTION  Background    Founded  in  xxxx  and  with  five  regional  production  facilities  in  Georgia,  Indiana,  Maine,  Pennsylvania,  and  South  Carolina,  xxxxx  has  been  serving  the  eastern  half  of  the  U.S.  with  the  manufacturing  of  traditional  forms  and  digital  print  related  products  and  services.    They  are  ranked  among  the  top  10  independent  forms  manufacturers  in  the  U.S.  in  sales  volume,  but  are  among  the  leaders  in  short  to  medium‐run custom forms.  xxxxx operates with additional entities known as xxxxx, xxxxx, and xxxxx.  Regarding the Workers’ Compensation program, xxxxx, currently carries a $xx,xxx per claim deductible.   This  limit  has  been  increased  from  the  $xx,xxx  deductible  carried  from  2007  –  2009  and  various  state  specific, net‐reporting small deductibles during the policy years 2005 – 2007.      Benchmarking & EMR Assessment Overview  The  assessment  includes  a  review  of  available  documentation  (such  as  historical  claims,  EMR,  and  exposure data), and countrywide industry results. This report includes a summary of our findings and a  high  level  strategy  for  improving  Safety  and  Health  practices,  Workers’  Compensation  experience  and  lowering the WC EMR, where applicable.  The report is divided into five (4) sections:  1) Safety  and  Health  Statistics  Benchmarking  Analysis  –  A  multi‐level  comparison  of  OSHA  log  and  Workers’  Compensation  results  vs.  information  from  the  Bureau  of  Labor  and  Statistics  (BLS)  and  industry peers.  2) Workers’ Compensation Experience Modification Rate (EMR) Examination – Details on the minimum  and controllable portions of the EMR and historical claims impact on the current EMR.  3) Total Cost of WC Accidents – Outline of the developed direct and indirect costs associated with WC  accidents and their impact on profitability  4) Conclusion  –  A  high‐level  overview  of  the  critical  findings  from  the  Benchmarking  Analysis,  EMR  Examination, and Total Accident Cost Impact on Profitability.   Assisting with the analysis was:   ‐ John Keller, ARM, CIC, AAI – Risk Management Advisor  ‐ David E. Carothers, CSP, ARM ‐ Managing Partner, Praxiom Risk Management  Page 3 of 18
  4. 4. Case Study ‐ Manufacturing  Safety and Health Benchmarking Analysis  SAFETY AND HEALTH STATISTICS BENCHMARKING ANALYSIS  The Benchmarking Analysis is an evaluation tool that:  • Benchmarks your results against other SIC specific companies   • Identifies opportunities to improve your outcomes    This report summarizes a comparison between xxxxx and similar companies insured by Liberty Mutual  (Wausau)  in  SIC  2761,  using  several  risk  management  outcome  measures.    The  loss  values  are  not  developed  to  their  likely  ultimate  cost.    Loss  rates  are  based  on  estimated  payroll  dollars  supplied  by  each employer.  xxxxx  is  also  compared  to  companies  in  the  NAICS  code  232110  with  information  obtained  from  the  Bureau of Labor and Statistics (BLS).  Most recent data available is through 2008.     Benchmarking Data  Liberty Mutual     5 Year Period (2005 – 2009)  xxxxx     SIC 2761  A  Total Incurred  $1,677,302     $6,840,301  B  Total Registered Claims  251     1,031  C  Total Registered Claims (>$0)  197     834  D  Closed w/o Settlement Ratio  21.6%  19.1%  E  Estimated Payroll  $95,092,907  $1,142,466,000  F  Average Cost per Claim (>$0)  $8,514  $8,202  G  Loss Rate / $100 Payroll  $1.76  $0.60  H  Non‐$0 Claim Frequency Rate / $1MM Payroll  2.07  0.73  I  # of Lost Time Claims  32  127  J  Lost Time Ratio  12.8%  15.3%  K  # of Claims >$10K  22  108  L  % of Claims >$10K  8.8%  13.0%  M  % of Incurred >$10K  81.0%  87.0%  N  Lost Time Closure Rate  84.4%  87.4%  O  # of Litigated Lost Time Claims  5  32  P  Litigation Ratio  15.6%  25.2%  Q  Average Cost per Litigated Claim  $181,722  $103,079  R  Total # of Disabilities Days  3,190  15,315  S  Disability Day Rate / $1MM Payroll  33.5  13.4  T  Median Report Lag  1.0  3.0  U  PPO Penetration  75.9%  65.7%  V  Total Medical Charged  $1,289,744  $6,233,578  X  Duplicate/Core/Professional Savings  $728,180  $3,497,892  Y  Professional Savings Ratio  56.5%  56.2%    Better than SIC Industry  Worse than SIC Industry  ?  Data not readily available  Page 4 of 18
  5. 5. Case Study ‐ Manufacturing  Safety and Health Benchmarking Analysis    SAFETY AND HEALTH STATISTICS BENCHMARKING ANALYSIS  xxxxx  Loss History (as of 4/30/2010) 05 – 06  06 – 07  07 – 08  08 – 09  09 – 10*  Payroll   $     20,000,000    $     20,125,123    $     19,722,307    $    17,733,477    $    17,512,000   Non‐$0 claims  63   38  48  28   20  Comp   $           186,217    $                7,486   $           440,304   $            21,465    $            40,692  Med   $           170,440    $             42,142    $           427,708   $            82,439    $          119,348  Exp   $             41,510    $                8,956   $             49,805   $              9,442    $            29,348  Total Incurred   $           398,167    $             58,584    $           917,817   $         113,346    $          189,388  *Partial Year Results  XXXXX Freq Rate  3.15  1.89  2.43  1.58  1.14  SIC 27 Freq Rate  0.73  0.73  0.73  0.73  0.73  XXXXX Loss Rate   $                  1.99    $                  0.29   $                  4.65   $                0.64    $                 1.08  SIC 27 Loss Rate   $                  0.60   $                  0.60  $                  0.60  $                0.60  $                 0.60        Payroll & Freqency Rate   $20,500,000  3.50   3.15 $20,000,000  3.00   $19,500,000  Frequency Rate 2.50   Total Payroll $19,000,000  $18,500,000  2.00   $18,000,000    1.50 $17,500,000  1.14   1.00 $17,000,000    $16,500,000  0.73 0.50   $16,000,000  0.00   05 ‐ 06 06 ‐ 07 07 ‐ 08 08 ‐ 09 09 ‐ 10*   Policy Year     Payroll WBF Freq Rate SIC 27 Freq Rate       • The majority of the benchmark criteria show xxxxx ahead of industry ratios, but the 5‐year  average for the two most critical benchmarks of claim frequency rate and incurred loss rate are  significantly above industry.      Page 5 of 18
  6. 6. Case Study ‐ Manufacturing  Safety and Health Benchmarking Analysis  Total Incurred & Loss Rate $1,000,000  $5.00  $900,000  $4.65  $4.50  $800,000  $4.00  Total Incurred $700,000  $3.50  Loss Rate $600,000  $3.00  $500,000  $2.50  $400,000  $2.00  $300,000  $1.50  $200,000  $1.08  $1.00  $100,000  $0.60  $0.50  $0.29  $‐ $‐ 05 ‐ 06 06 ‐ 07 07 ‐ 08 08 ‐ 09 09 ‐ 10* Policy Year Total Incurred WBF Loss Rate SIC 27 Loss Rate     Data Definitions  • Loss rate/$100 of payroll:  Total loss dollars/total payroll per $100.  • Non‐$0  claim  frequency  rate/$1MM  of  payroll:    Total  number  of  non‐$0  claims/total  payroll  per  $1MM.    Data Interpretation:  Loss & Claim Frequency Rates  • A high loss rate  suggests one or more of the following:  ∗ a number of high cost claims have incurred  ∗ slower closure rates  ∗ unchallenged carrier reserving practices  ∗ late claim reporting  ∗ discrepancy in expense definition and chargeback  • A low loss rate suggests:  ∗ loss hazards have been identified  ∗ appropriate safety programs have been implemented and enforced  • A high frequency rate suggests:   ∗ Safety controls are absent or not appropriately reinforced  ∗ Employee behaviors need to be aligned to specific job standards  • A low frequency rate suggests:  ∗ safety procedures and controls are documented, implemented, and understood  ∗ Company may not be reporting all of its claims.      Page 6 of 18
  7. 7. Case Study ‐ Manufacturing  Safety and Health Benchmarking Analysis  SAFETY AND HEALTH STATISTICS BENCHMARKING ANALYSIS      Total Incident Rate vs NAICS 323110 Comparative Stats from BLS 5 4 Incident Rate  per 100 ee's 3 2 1 0 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 US 4.6 4.2 4.3 3.8 3.3 WBF   Lost Time Rate vs NAICS 323110 Comparative Stats from BLS 1.25 Lost Time Cases per 100 ee's 1 0.75 0.5 0.25 0 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 US 1.3 1.1 1.2 1.1 0.9 WBF   • A review of xxxxx’s OHSA 300 logs is required to complete the comparison to BLS statistics.        Page 7 of 18
  8. 8. Case Study ‐ Manufacturing  Safety and Health Benchmarking Analysis  LOSS SOURCE ANALYSIS      Wise Business Forms   Percentage of Cases by Accident Cause   Other Machine   18% 15%   Struck by Material    20% Handling 28% SIC 2761   Percentage of Cases by Accident Cause   Repeated    Slip and Fall Trauma Other 12% 7%   22% Material  Handling   30% Repeated    Trauma 8% • Top  five  loss  areas,  regarding  claim  count,  for  Struck by xxxxx are consistent with the top five loss areas  19% Machine for the SIC industry.  Slip and  10% • Machine  injuries  represent  only  15%  of  xxxxx’s  Fall total  claims  but  a  disproportionate  51%  of  the  11% incurred  dollars.    The  claimant  1  claim  ($728,900)  is  significantly  distorting  the  incurred  percentage.  •  None  of  xxxxx’s  additional  loss  sources  included  in  “Other”  was  higher  than  7%  of  the  total  claims.                      Page 8 of 18
  9. 9. Case Study ‐ Manufacturing  Safety and Health Benchmarking Analysis  LOSS SOURCE ANALYSIS (Continued)    Wise Business Forms   Percentage Incurred by Accident Cause     Slip and Fall Other 3% Struck by 7%   SIC 2761 3% Repeated    Percentage Incurred by Accident Cause Trauma 5%   Machine   Other Repeated  10% Material  51%   Trauma 7% Handling   31%   Struck by Material  8%   Handling 40%   Slip and Fall   9% Machine • Top  five  loss  areas,  regarding  incurred  costs,  for  26% xxxxx  are  consistent  with  the  top  five  loss  areas  for  the SIC industry.  • As of 4/30/10 6 of xxxxx’s largest 10 claims, in the  last 5 years, were still open and could impact the loss source ratios moving forward.  • Slip and falls represent 12% of all claims (1% higher than the industry), but only 3% of all  incurred costs (6% less than industry).  Special care should be taken regarding this loss area to  prevent the potential high value claim.      Page 9 of 18
  10. 10. Case Study ‐ Manufacturing  Safety and Health Benchmarking Analysis  WC EXPERIENCE MOD EXAMINATION  The Mod Formula    APL + B + (W x AEL) + (1‐W) x EEL  EPL + B + (W x EEL) + (1‐W) x EEL    The mod formula looks complex, but it is carefully designed to  take  into  consideration  industry  averages,  company  size,  and  loss history.  Actual losses are compared to expected losses but a ballast value is used to "stabilize" the  formula and to move all mods closer to 1.00.  The weighting value increases for larger companies and  places more emphasis on the actual loss history as the company increases in size.     Your 2009 Mod Calculation    87518 + 50317 + (0.27 x 297846) + (1 – 0.27) x 246812  1.06 =  76999 + 50317 + (0.27 x 246812) + (1 – 0.27) x 246812    As  a  business  owner  or  financial  manager,  it  is  important  to  identify  and  understand  every  cost  associated with doing business.  The workers' compensation modification factor for Your Company has a  significant  impact  on  the  cost  of  workers'  compensation  insurance.    This  alone  is  reason  enough  to  better  understand  the  underlying  theory,  formula, and  data  that  determines  your  modification  factor.   However, the experience rating worksheet, which is used to communicate the modification factor, can  also provide valuable insight into your company's operation.    The following pages of this report explain, with minimal industry jargon, the experience rating formula  and  the  computation  of  the  modification  factor.    For  convenience,  the  workers'  compensation  modification factor will be referred to as the "mod" throughout the report.  This report will show you  how  low  your  mod  could  be,  the  potential  savings,  and  the  true  cost  of  your  losses.    Mod  synopsis  provided by QuickMod.       Page 10 of 18
  11. 11. Case Study ‐ Manufacturing  Safety and Health Benchmarking Analysis  WC EXPERIENCE MOD EXAMINATION (Continued)  The Minimum and Controllable Mod:     Mod Value  Premium  Minimum mod (mod with no losses)  0.62   $ 170.500  Mod increase due to primary losses  0.23   $    63,250   Mod increase due to excess losses  0.21   $    57,750   Total controllable mod  0.44   $  121,000  Mod  1.06   $  291,500    Mod Description  Mod  Premium  Average Mod  1.00   $   275,000  Current Mod  1.06   $   291,500  Minimum Mod  0.62   $   170,500  Controllable Mod  0.44   $   121,000    Your  mod  is  currently  1.06  and  you  are  paying  an  estimated  manual  premium  in  NCCI  states  of  $291,500.    If  you  were  able  to  prevent  all  losses,  then  you  could  lower  your  mod  to  0.62  and  save  $121,000.    An  average  competitor  with  a  mod  of  1.00  is  paying  $275,000  for  similar  workers  compensation insurance coverage.  This puts your company at a $16,500 disadvantage as compared to  your average competitor.       Premium $ Controllable Mod $121,000  Minimum Mod $170,500  Current Mod $291,500  Average Mod $275,000          Page 11 of 18
  12. 12. Case Study ‐ Manufacturing  Safety and Health Benchmarking Analysis  WC EXPERIENCE MOD EXAMINATION (Continued)  Analysis of Primary and Excess Losses:    As part of the experience rating process, losses are "split" into two categories called primary and excess.   Primary losses are the first $5,000 of each claim.  Excess losses are all amounts over the first $5,000 of  each claim.  The amount of primary losses you have is then used as a way to measure loss frequency.   The  amount  of  excess  losses  is  then  a  measure  of  loss  severity.    Because  underwriters  are  generally  worried more about loss frequency, the mod formula is designed to allow primary losses to have a larger  impact on the mod than excess losses.  This report compares actual vs. expected losses for both primary  and excess losses and provides a written evaluation of the ratio.    Ratio of actual primary losses to expected primary losses    114%    Your Company has experienced a level of primary losses that is higher than  expected.  A  high level of  primary losses greatly increases your modification factor.  The level of primary losses is an indication of  the  loss  frequency.    Your  company  is  experiencing  more  losses  than  expected.    This  makes  your  company vulnerable to loss severity.      Ratio of actual excess losses to expected excess losses      121%    Your  company  has  experienced  a  level  of  excess  losses  that  is  higher  than  expected.    A  high  level  of  excess losses increases your modification factor.  The bigger your company, the more emphasis is placed  on  excess  losses  and  the  bigger  the  impact  of  excess  losses  on  your  modification  factor.    The  level  of  excess losses is an indication of the severity of each claim.  On average, each loss your company incurs is  more severe than would be expected.  Actual vs. Expected Losses $450,000 $400,000 $350,000 Loss Amount $300,000 $250,000 $200,000 $150,000 $100,000 $50,000 $0 Actual Expected Primary Excess   Incurred  Value to increase Mod by 0.01  Primary   ~$   3,500   Excess   ~$  13,000   Page 12 of 18
  13. 13. Case Study ‐ Manufacturing  Safety and Health Benchmarking Analysis  WC EXPERIENCE MOD EXAMINATION (Continued)  Loss Sensitivity Analysis and the "True" Cost of a Loss    Impact  Mod without  Increase in Premium  Claimant  Date  Loss Amount  on Mod  This loss  1 year  2 year  3 Year  # Claimant 1  08/06/07   $         151,547   0.1191  0.9458   $             32,753    $       65,506    $      98,259   Claimant 2  12/11/07   $            55,313   0.0497  1.0153   $            13,668    $       27,336    $       41,004  Claimant 3  12/11/08   $            28,308   0.0302  1.0348   $               8,305    $       16,610    $       24,915  Claimant 4  07/27/07   $            17,622   0.0225  1.0425   $               6,188    $       12,376    $       18,564  Claimant 5  09/28/07   $            15,306   0.0208  1.0441   $               5,720    $       11,440    $       17,160  #  Limited loss      This  analysis  computes  the  true  cost  of  a  loss.    Each  loss  in  the  calculation  increases  the  mod  and  increases the premium paid.  The data used to compute a mod covers a three year period.  So, each loss  stays  in  the  mod  computation  three  years.    Therefore,  we  can  estimate  the  true  cost  of  a  loss  in  the  terms of the resulting increase in premium over the three year period.  From the table above, we can  see that the 8/06/07 Claimant 1 claim was limited to a total of $151,547 (down from the total incurred  of $698,250) and increased the mod by 0.1191.  This will result in an increase in premium  of $98,259  over the course of three years, and is the direct premium cost associated with this claim.    All of the above claims included indemnity payments which disqualifies them from a 70% reduction prior  to the claim value being included in the mod calculation.  The 70% reduction for med‐only claims offers  a  significant  incentive  for  all  companies  in  Experience  Rating  Adjustment  (ERA)  approved  states  to  maintain effective return to work and light duty programs.  The 70% reduction in med‐only claims also  offers an incentive to report all claims to the insurance carrier.      The Claimant 2 claim from 12/11/07, while still open, was found to be incorrectly reported to the NCCI.   The current EMR worksheet values the claim at a total of $55,313, but the current loss runs only have a  med/indemnity incurred value of $40,194.  This $15,119 difference is increasing the current 2010 EMR  by .011 which translates into additional standard premium of $3,025.    Page 13 of 18
  14. 14. Case Study ‐ Manufacturing  Safety and Health Benchmarking Analysis  WC EXPERIENCE MOD EXAMINATION (Continued)  Single Claim Value Impact on Premium    Claim Value Impact on Premium $80,000 $80,000 $70,000 $70,000 $60,000 $60,000 Single Claim Value Premium Increase Due to Mod $50,000 $50,000 $40,000 $40,000 $30,000 $30,000 $30,000 $20,000 $25,910 $20,000 $20,000 $11,026 $19,956 $10,000 $5,000 $10,000 $7,773 $- $3,308 $0 $1,000 $3,000 $5,000 $20,000 $40,000 $60,000 $80,000 $100,000 Single Claim Value 3-year premium increase - w/ Indemnity 3-year premium increase - Med Only Claim amount   This analysis shows the correspondence of claim value to premium increase due to the mod, it does not  contemplate offsetting discretionary or deductible credits commonly used by an underwriter.     Since  a  70%  credit  is  applied  to  medical  only  claims  filed  in  Experience  Rating  Adjustment  (ERA)  approved states.  This is represented by the bottom (Blue) line in the graph.  Medical only claims in all  other states and all claims that include indemnity payments are represented by the red line in the graph.   The claim value benchmark is represented by the solid black line.      This  graph  illustrates  that  a  $5,000  claim,  which  includes  indemnity,  will  increase  the  mod  and  corresponding premium by ~$11,026.  The virtual "break even" point is with a $20,000 claim (including  indemnity)  which  generates  an  increase  in  premium  of  ~$19,956.    For  all  claim  values  >$20,000  the  corresponding increase in premium is less than that of the claim.       Page 14 of 18
  15. 15. Case Study ‐ Manufacturing  Safety and Health Benchmarking Analysis  TOTAL COST OF WC ACCIDENTS   Loss Development and Indirect Costs  A  Loss  Development  Factor  (LDF)  is  used  by  insurance  carriers  to  project  what  your  company’s  claims  will ultimately cost.  The LDF includes an adjustment to claim reserves for "development" of claims and  incurred but not reported losses (IBNR).  The LDF can be a national or state rate and will vary by policy  year (older policy periods will have a lower LDF since claims have matured somewhat).  Indirect  costs  consist  of  a  multitude  of  factors  such  as  downtime,  dissatisfied  customers,  operating  delays, costs to train and compensate a replacement worker and temporary labor.  Indirect costs, while  less obvious, can significantly impact your business' financials and profitability.  Studies show that the ratio of indirect to direct costs varies from a high of 20:1 to a low of 1:1.  OSHA  studies indicate the indirect cost of an accident to be 4.5x the direct cost.  We have taken a conservative  approach and are using a 2:1 ratio to calculate your indirect costs.  We have also taken the conservative  route of not including NPV trending of the total accident costs.    xxxxx  Loss History (as of 4/30/2010)  05 – 06  06 ‐ 07  07 ‐ 08  08 ‐ 09  09 ‐ 10*  Payroll   $20,000,000    $20,125,123   $19,722,307    $17,733,477    $17,512,000   Non‐$0 claims  63  38  48  28   20  Comp   $      186,217    $           7,486    $       440,304   $         21,465    $        40,692   Med   $      170,440    $         42,142    $       427,708   $         82,439    $      119,348  Exp   $        41,510    $           8,956    $         49,805   $           9,442    $        29,348   Total Incurred   $      398,167    $         58,584    $       917,817   $       113,346    $      189,388  LD Factor  1.10  1.25  1.50  1.75  2.00  Developed Losses   $      437,984    $         73,230    $   1,376,726    $       198,356    $      378,776  Indirect Factor  2.0  2.0  2.0  2.0  2.0  Indirect Costs   $      796,334    $       117,168    $  1,835,634    $       226,692    $      378,776  Total Accident Cost   $     1,234,318   $       190,398    $   3,212,360    $       425,048    $      757,552  5‐Year Average   $   1,163,935   3‐Year Ave. excl H/L   $      805,639         Page 15 of 18
  16. 16. Case Study ‐ Manufacturing  Safety and Health Benchmarking Analysis  Financial Impact of Injuries on Profitability  The following analysis was performed to give your management team a different perspective on the  impact accidents can have on your business’ overall performance.    REVENUE/SALES REQUIRE TO COVER WC COSTS  Estimated Annual Sales  $62,500,000   Profit Margin (assume 5%)  $3,125,000   3‐Year Selected Avg. Total Accident Cost (05‐10) $805,639   Additional sales required to offset accident costs  $16,112,780   Average Sales/day (Estimated Annual Sales / 365)  $171,233   Additional days of sales required to offset losses  94.1 Days    Clearly,  company  revenues  are  being  diverted  to  replace  profits  lost  due  to  accident  costs.    Your  company’s risk management performance is a critical component of your business’ long‐term financial  success.        Page 16 of 18
  17. 17. Case Study ‐ Manufacturing  Safety and Health Benchmarking Analysis  CONCLUSION  Safety and Health Statistics Benchmarking Analysis  • Frequency and Loss Rate are significantly above SIC industry average (2.07 v 0.73 and $1.76 v $0.60,  respectively).  This is typically an indicator of disconnection between positive management attitude  toward  safety,  the  implementation  of  job  specific  safety  protocols,  and  employee  behavior.   Additional hands‐on safety and loss control consulting may be needed to identify frequency and loss  drivers.  • Median report lag time (1 day) is well above industry average (3 days).  Claim procedures seem to be  well understood and efficiently filed.  • PPO penetration (75.9%) is well above industry average (65.7%).  xxxxx is experiencing opportunities  for cost containment above industry average due proper direction of claimants within the network  PPO.  • OSHA  300  logs  are  required  to  complete  the  Bureau  of  Labor  and  Statistics  (BLS)  comparison.    5  years of BLS data have been provided as a baseline.    The Experience Modification Rate (EMR) Examination   • When  comparing xxxxx’s current  EMR  (1.06) to its  minimum  mod of 0.62, this leaves xxxxx with a  controllable mod of 0.44.  The premium value of the controllable mod is $121,000.  This premium  value  can  be  realized  through  the  effective  implementation  of  safety,  loss  control,  and  claims  management measures.  • An  evaluation  of  primary  (<$5,000)  and  excess  (>$5,000)  claims  showed  xxxxx  exceeded  industry  averages for both claim categories.  This confirms the elevated frequency and loss rates found in the  benchmarking analysis.  • An error was found in the calculation of the 2010 EMR.  The Claimant 2 claim from 12/11/07, while  still open, was found to be incorrectly reported to the NCCI.  The current EMR worksheet values the  claim  at  a  total  of  $55,313,  but  the  current  loss  runs  report  a  med/indemnity  incurred  value  of  $40,194.  This $15,119 difference is increasing the current 2010 EMR by .011 which translates into  additional modified premium of $3,025.  A petition to the NCCI should be made to correct the EMR  and refund the premium.  • The  EMR  exam  revealed  that  XXXXX  will  pay  more  in  increased  premium  for  all  claims,  which  included indemnity, at a value of ~$20,000 or less.  Proper selection of filed claims and deductible  levels will positively impact XXXXX accident costs and EMR.    Loss Development and Indirect Costs  • xxxxx’s  developed,  selected  average  WC  accident  cost  since  2005  is  $805,639  per  year.    This  translates (at a 5% margin) into 94.1 days just to pay for WC accidents.                 Page 17 of 18
  18. 18. Case Study ‐ Manufacturing  Safety and Health Benchmarking Analysis  APPENDIX    Government and Regulatory Sites  • Engineering & Safety Services:  http://www3.iso.com/ess/   • Occupational Safety & Health Administration:  http://www.osha.gov/   • National Institute for Occupational Safety & Health:  http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/homepage.html   • Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupation‐Related Statistics:  http://stats.bls.gov/oshhome.htm   • Department of Transportation:  http://www.dot.gov/   • Bureau of Transportation Statistics:  http://www.bts.gov/   • National Infrastructure Protection Center: http://www.nipc.gov/   Safety Councils, Organizations, and Other Safety Sites  • A.M. Best Company:  http://www.ambest.com/   • American National Standards Institute:  http://web.ansi.org/   • American Occupational Therapy Association:  http://www.aota.org/   • AFL‐CIO & Safety:  http://www.aflcio.org/safety/   • American Conference of Government Industrial Hygienists, Inc:  http://www.acgih.org/   • American Society of Safety Engineers:  http://www.asse.org/   • Compliance Magazine: http://www.compliancemag.com/   • Finnish Institute of Occupational Health:  http://www.occuphealth.fi/e/   • IBM Healthy Computing:  http://www.pc.ibm.com/ww/healthycomputing/   • Institution of Occupational Safety and Health:  http://www.iosh.co.uk/home.cfm   • International Hazard Datasheets on Occupation:   http://www.ilo.org/public/english/protection/safework/cis/products/hdo/htm/index.htm   • National Coalition on Ergonomics:  http://www.ncergo.org/   • National Safety Council:  http://www.nsc.org/   • Professional Safety:  http://www.asse.org/bprofe.htm   • Safety Info:  http://www.safetyinfo.com     • Safety Online Newsletter:  http://www.safetyonline.com/subscribe/1573873   • Security Resource Net’s Corporate Safety:  http://nsi.org/safety.html   • Teen Worker Safety:  http://www.dol.gov/dol/opa/public/summer/employer.htm   • The Insurance Guide:  http://www.insure.com   • Thomas Register:  http://thomasregister.com    • Typing Injury Frequently Asked Questions:  http://www.tifaq.com/   • United Auto Workers:  http://www.uaw.org/publications/h&s/index.html    • Workplace Eye Safety, Prevent Blindness America: http://www.preventblindness.org/safety/worksafe.html3           Page 18 of 18

×