The Condensed Version<br />March 1, 2011<br />Guided Tours<br />
Basic layout of a guided tour<br />Defined objectives<br />Introduction<br />Content<br />Conclusion<br />Evaluation of le...
Objectives<br />Content you intend the audience to learn<br />Examples:<br />The visitor will be able to identify the hist...
Learning Goals<br />How you will accomplish and measure your objectives<br />Examples:<br />The visitor will be able to id...
Learning Goals<br />Examples:<br />The visitor will be able to identify the historical progression of basketball<br />Appl...
Learning Goals<br />Students will be able to understand and identify sculptures based on its medium.<br />Show 3 mediums; ...
Learning Goals<br />Students will be able to understand and identify sculptures based on its medium.<br />PA State Standar...
Introduction<br />Introduce the institution, its history, mission, and a brief overview of the museums exhibits/collection...
Interpretive Techniques<br />Lecture<br />Lecture Discussion<br />Inquiry Discussion<br />Guided Discovery<br />Guided Inv...
Interpretive Techniques<br />Lecture technique:<br />How the majority of your collegiate professors conduct class.<br />Pr...
Interpretive Techniques<br />Lecture Discussion Technique:<br />Similar to lecture technique, but now welcomes questions a...
Interpretive Techniques<br />Inquiry Discussion Technique:<br />Tour is set up as more of a dialog, consisting of question...
Interpretive Techniques<br />Guided Discovery Technique:<br />Offers visitors a structured activity that requires them to ...
Interpretive Techniques<br />Guided Involvement Technique:<br />Similar to Guided Discovery, but its highly structured .<b...
Interpretive Techniques<br />Random:<br />Self-guided walk through of the museum with a guide present.<br />Often used whe...
Questioning Strategies<br />Memory<br />Convergent<br />Divergent<br />Judgmental<br />
Questioning Strategies<br />Memory<br />Facts, names, dates, etc.<br />“how many…”<br />“what is the…”<br />“name the…”<br />
Questioning Strategies<br />Convergent questions<br />Seek the most appropriate/best answer<br />There is one best answer<...
Questioning Strategies<br />Divergent questions<br />Open-ended questions that encourage multiple answers.<br />Questions ...
Questioning Strategies<br />Judgmental questions<br />Encourages each visitor to formulate an opinion, value, or belief th...
Questioning Strategies<br />Levels of questions<br />Naming objects<br />Discriminating characteristics of objects and eve...
Tour Aids<br />Games<br />Improvisation<br />Hands-on materials<br />Project-directed and data retrieval<br />Storytelling...
Conclusion<br />Review/give a summary what was seen or done<br />Ask their most enjoyable part of the tour, what they reme...
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Guided tours

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Guided tours

  1. 1. The Condensed Version<br />March 1, 2011<br />Guided Tours<br />
  2. 2. Basic layout of a guided tour<br />Defined objectives<br />Introduction<br />Content<br />Conclusion<br />Evaluation of learning<br />
  3. 3. Objectives<br />Content you intend the audience to learn<br />Examples:<br />The visitor will be able to identify the historical progression of basketball<br />Students will be able to identify the cultural affect of Penn State’s 1947 Cotton Bowl team<br />Visitors will be able to recognize artwork from the Impressionistic period.<br />Students will be able to identify sculpture based on its medium.<br />
  4. 4. Learning Goals<br />How you will accomplish and measure your objectives<br />Examples:<br />The visitor will be able to identify the historical progression of basketball<br />Discuss Dr. Naismith, and his intention with inventing basketball.<br />Explain the roots of the name basket-ball.<br />Show antique replica of a 1920’s basketball and talk about what “dribbling” originally looked like.<br />Discuss women’s role in basketball, and how the game was first played by women.<br />Etc<br />
  5. 5. Learning Goals<br />Examples:<br />The visitor will be able to identify the historical progression of basketball<br />Apply PA State Standards for History:<br />8.3.12.A<br />Identify and evaluate the political and cultural contributions of individuals and groups to the United States history from 1890-present<br />Cultural and commercial leaders<br />8.3.12.C<br />Evaluate how continuity and change has influenced United States history from 1890-present<br />Innovations<br />Social organization<br />Women’s movement<br />
  6. 6. Learning Goals<br />Students will be able to understand and identify sculptures based on its medium.<br />Show 3 mediums; clay, metal, and wood.<br />Talk about the similarities and differences between the 3, i.e. how they are made, how valuable they might be, etc.<br />Use hands on materials to feel the differences between the 3 and describe other things that are made out of those materials.<br />Continue throughout the museum seeking to identify other artwork made out of the materials they’ve been learning about.<br />
  7. 7. Learning Goals<br />Students will be able to understand and identify sculptures based on its medium.<br />PA State Standards for Arts and Humanities:<br />9.3.3.C<br />Know classification skills with materials and processes used to create works in the arts.<br />9.3.3.F<br />Know how to recognize and identify similar and different characteristics among works of art.<br />
  8. 8. Introduction<br />Introduce the institution, its history, mission, and a brief overview of the museums exhibits/collections.<br />Introduce yourself<br />Find out something about your visitors<br />Let visitors know your plan<br />Point out important areas (restroom, water fountain, etc)<br />Cover basic museum rules<br />
  9. 9. Interpretive Techniques<br />Lecture<br />Lecture Discussion<br />Inquiry Discussion<br />Guided Discovery<br />Guided Involvement<br />Random<br />
  10. 10. Interpretive Techniques<br />Lecture technique:<br />How the majority of your collegiate professors conduct class.<br />Pros<br />Cons<br />
  11. 11. Interpretive Techniques<br />Lecture Discussion Technique:<br />Similar to lecture technique, but now welcomes questions and visitor participation in discussions.<br />Ideal for adult groups, good college aged groups, and acceptable for older adolescent groups.<br />Pros<br />Cons<br />
  12. 12. Interpretive Techniques<br />Inquiry Discussion Technique:<br />Tour is set up as more of a dialog, consisting of questions, exchanging of answers, and discussion between guides and visitors.<br />Visitors explore ideas with guidance and direction of a guide.<br />Guides function as more of a discussion leader, rather than a lecturer.<br />Specific facts are less important than the general context, time period, culture, etc.<br />Appropriate for any age group.<br />Pros<br />Cons<br />
  13. 13. Interpretive Techniques<br />Guided Discovery Technique:<br />Offers visitors a structured activity that requires them to make individual choices on what they wish to learn within the exhibits.<br />Best for children older than 7yrs old, through adults.<br />Pros<br />Cons<br />
  14. 14. Interpretive Techniques<br />Guided Involvement Technique:<br />Similar to Guided Discovery, but its highly structured .<br />Visitors/students are given a task, often will work together in small groups with direct supervision.<br />Each activity occurs over short periods of time and within limited areas.<br />Pros<br />Cons<br />
  15. 15. Interpretive Techniques<br />Random:<br />Self-guided walk through of the museum with a guide present.<br />Often used when visitors come to a museum and request a guided walk-through (if a museum is capable and able to provide it), when very large groups request a tour, or when groups become difficult and frustrated guides walk with them to keep them together and move them out of the exhibits and museum in an orderly fashion.<br />
  16. 16. Questioning Strategies<br />Memory<br />Convergent<br />Divergent<br />Judgmental<br />
  17. 17. Questioning Strategies<br />Memory<br />Facts, names, dates, etc.<br />“how many…”<br />“what is the…”<br />“name the…”<br />
  18. 18. Questioning Strategies<br />Convergent questions<br />Seek the most appropriate/best answer<br />There is one best answer<br />
  19. 19. Questioning Strategies<br />Divergent questions<br />Open-ended questions that encourage multiple answers.<br />Questions demand imaginative thinking and exploration of all possibilities.<br />There is no “right” answer<br />“what if…”<br />“how many ways…”<br />“imagine that…”<br />
  20. 20. Questioning Strategies<br />Judgmental questions<br />Encourages each visitor to formulate an opinion, value, or belief that is personal to them.<br />
  21. 21. Questioning Strategies<br />Levels of questions<br />Naming objects<br />Discriminating characteristics of objects and events<br />Classifying and grouping objects and events<br />Making inferences<br />Drawing conclusions based on observations, forming a hypotheses, making a logical judgments, etc.<br />Evaluation and Judgment <br />Choose, decide, evaluate, judge, assess, give your opinion, tell which is preferable, etc.<br />
  22. 22. Tour Aids<br />Games<br />Improvisation<br />Hands-on materials<br />Project-directed and data retrieval<br />Storytelling<br />Audio-visual aids<br />Films<br />Interactive exhibits<br />
  23. 23. Conclusion<br />Review/give a summary what was seen or done<br />Ask their most enjoyable part of the tour, what they remember the most, etc.<br />Encourage visitors to return. Cite future programming/events at the museum.<br />Self-evaluate. Did you accomplish your objectives?<br />

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