A comparison of Biogas Clean Up Technologies Frank Hofmann 7th July 2011, UK AD & Biogas 2011, Birmingham
Table of contents <ul><ul><li>Reasons for upgrading biogas </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Technical characteristics </li></ul>...
Upgraded Biogas Source: Deutsches BiomasseForschungsZentrum gGmbH
Overview: utilisation of biogas Upgrading and feeding biogas into the natural gas grid offers the possibility to use the u...
Differences between biogas and  natural H-gas
Technical requirements <ul><ul><li>Biogas belongs to the same gas-family as natural gas (alcane) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><l...
Technical requirements, cont. <ul><ul><li>The burning characteristics have to be the same as using natural gas, for exampl...
Upgrading technologies for biogas
Gas injection and transport  <ul><ul><li>Biogas pipe-line to the connection point </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Control of ga...
Pressure Swing Adsoption source: energy-21.de
Water Scrubbing source: energy-21.de
Membrane separation source: energy-21.de
Cost calculations source: energy-21.de
<ul><li>41 running plants with about 25,000 m³/h biomethane </li></ul><ul><li>Largest: 5,300 m³/h biomethane </li></ul><ul...
Biogas feed-in capacity in Europe sorted according to countries Sources:   dena, ISET, DVGW e.V.
Conclusions biogas upgrading and  gas grid connection <ul><li>The overall feed-in capacity of all European biogas feed-in ...
Please contact us for more information <ul><li>Ecofys Germany GmbH </li></ul><ul><li>Stralauer Platz 34 </li></ul><ul><li>...
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4.3 - "A Comparison of Biogas Clean Up Technologies" - Frank Hofmann [EN]

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  • See additions in red.
  • See additions in red.
  • See additions in red.
  • Technologies have differences in internal energy demand, electricity and/or heat. Heating of the digester requires additional input of energy, possibly from a wood fired boiler, also residual heat form the upgrading could be applied.
  • See additions in red.
  • Technologies have differences in internal energy demand, electricity and/or heat. Heating of the digester requires additional input of energy, possibly from a wood fired boiler, also residual heat form the upgrading could be applied.
  • Technologies have differences in internal energy demand, electricity and/or heat. Heating of the digester requires additional input of energy, possibly from a wood fired boiler, also residual heat form the upgrading could be applied.
  • Technologies have differences in internal energy demand, electricity and/or heat. Heating of the digester requires additional input of energy, possibly from a wood fired boiler, also residual heat form the upgrading could be applied.
  • Technologies have differences in internal energy demand, electricity and/or heat. Heating of the digester requires additional input of energy, possibly from a wood fired boiler, also residual heat form the upgrading could be applied.
  • Technologies have differences in internal energy demand, electricity and/or heat. Heating of the digester requires additional input of energy, possibly from a wood fired boiler, also residual heat form the upgrading could be applied.
  • Technologies have differences in internal energy demand, electricity and/or heat. Heating of the digester requires additional input of energy, possibly from a wood fired boiler, also residual heat form the upgrading could be applied.
  • 4.3 - "A Comparison of Biogas Clean Up Technologies" - Frank Hofmann [EN]

    1. 1. A comparison of Biogas Clean Up Technologies Frank Hofmann 7th July 2011, UK AD & Biogas 2011, Birmingham
    2. 2. Table of contents <ul><ul><li>Reasons for upgrading biogas </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Technical characteristics </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Upgrading Technology (examples) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Pressure swing adsorption </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>(Water) scrubbing </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Menbrane separation </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Costs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>European and German situation </li></ul></ul>
    3. 3. Upgraded Biogas Source: Deutsches BiomasseForschungsZentrum gGmbH
    4. 4. Overview: utilisation of biogas Upgrading and feeding biogas into the natural gas grid offers the possibility to use the upgraded biogas at the location of demand for electricity, heat, cold or fuel. Source: Ecofys
    5. 5. Differences between biogas and natural H-gas
    6. 6. Technical requirements <ul><ul><li>Biogas belongs to the same gas-family as natural gas (alcane) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>After upgrading biogas, calorific value, density and Wobbe Index are similar to natural gas </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Feed-in as replacement gas or additional gas </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Biogas can be adapted to the quality of natural gas </li></ul></ul>
    7. 7. Technical requirements, cont. <ul><ul><li>The burning characteristics have to be the same as using natural gas, for example primary air in the burner, the speed of the flame and the ignition point </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Odorisation is necessary </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Depending on the upgrading method,the gas pressure vary from 0 up to 6 - 10 bar (at the outlet) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Biomethane has to be adapted to the pressure </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>of the gas grid </li></ul></ul>
    8. 8. Upgrading technologies for biogas
    9. 9. Gas injection and transport <ul><ul><li>Biogas pipe-line to the connection point </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Control of gas ingredients with gas chromatography </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Upgrading facility with calibrated measuring tool </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Odorisation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Pressure adaption </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Connection to the natural gas pipeline </li></ul></ul>
    10. 10. Pressure Swing Adsoption source: energy-21.de
    11. 11. Water Scrubbing source: energy-21.de
    12. 12. Membrane separation source: energy-21.de
    13. 13. Cost calculations source: energy-21.de
    14. 14. <ul><li>41 running plants with about 25,000 m³/h biomethane </li></ul><ul><li>Largest: 5,300 m³/h biomethane </li></ul><ul><li>Mainly 4 Technologies </li></ul>Biogas upgrading in Germany
    15. 15. Biogas feed-in capacity in Europe sorted according to countries Sources:   dena, ISET, DVGW e.V.
    16. 16. Conclusions biogas upgrading and gas grid connection <ul><li>The overall feed-in capacity of all European biogas feed-in projects in operation currently amounts to 28,000 Nm³/h or about 150 MW </li></ul><ul><li>Main technologies are pressurized water scrubbing, pressurizes swing absorption, chemical (water) scrubbing and membrane separation </li></ul><ul><li>The specific upgrading costs are highly depending on the biogas volume rate </li></ul><ul><li>Locations: Sweden, Switzerland, Netherlands, France, Germany </li></ul><ul><li>Main utilization as gas grid injection or car fuel </li></ul><ul><li>In Europe ~8 technology suppliers of upgrading biogas technology </li></ul>
    17. 17. Please contact us for more information <ul><li>Ecofys Germany GmbH </li></ul><ul><li>Stralauer Platz 34 </li></ul><ul><li>10243 Berlin </li></ul><ul><li>Germany </li></ul><ul><li>Frank Hofmann </li></ul><ul><li>T: +49 (0) 30 2977 3579 41 </li></ul><ul><li>E: f.hofmann@ecofys.de </li></ul><ul><li>W: www.ecofys.de </li></ul>

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