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University at Buffalo Career Services Academic Job Search and Talk Spring 2014
University at Buffalo Career Services Academic Job Search and Talk Spring 2014
University at Buffalo Career Services Academic Job Search and Talk Spring 2014
University at Buffalo Career Services Academic Job Search and Talk Spring 2014
University at Buffalo Career Services Academic Job Search and Talk Spring 2014
University at Buffalo Career Services Academic Job Search and Talk Spring 2014
University at Buffalo Career Services Academic Job Search and Talk Spring 2014
University at Buffalo Career Services Academic Job Search and Talk Spring 2014
University at Buffalo Career Services Academic Job Search and Talk Spring 2014
University at Buffalo Career Services Academic Job Search and Talk Spring 2014
University at Buffalo Career Services Academic Job Search and Talk Spring 2014
University at Buffalo Career Services Academic Job Search and Talk Spring 2014
University at Buffalo Career Services Academic Job Search and Talk Spring 2014
University at Buffalo Career Services Academic Job Search and Talk Spring 2014
University at Buffalo Career Services Academic Job Search and Talk Spring 2014
University at Buffalo Career Services Academic Job Search and Talk Spring 2014
University at Buffalo Career Services Academic Job Search and Talk Spring 2014
University at Buffalo Career Services Academic Job Search and Talk Spring 2014
University at Buffalo Career Services Academic Job Search and Talk Spring 2014
University at Buffalo Career Services Academic Job Search and Talk Spring 2014
University at Buffalo Career Services Academic Job Search and Talk Spring 2014
University at Buffalo Career Services Academic Job Search and Talk Spring 2014
University at Buffalo Career Services Academic Job Search and Talk Spring 2014
University at Buffalo Career Services Academic Job Search and Talk Spring 2014
University at Buffalo Career Services Academic Job Search and Talk Spring 2014
University at Buffalo Career Services Academic Job Search and Talk Spring 2014
University at Buffalo Career Services Academic Job Search and Talk Spring 2014
University at Buffalo Career Services Academic Job Search and Talk Spring 2014
University at Buffalo Career Services Academic Job Search and Talk Spring 2014
University at Buffalo Career Services Academic Job Search and Talk Spring 2014
University at Buffalo Career Services Academic Job Search and Talk Spring 2014
University at Buffalo Career Services Academic Job Search and Talk Spring 2014
University at Buffalo Career Services Academic Job Search and Talk Spring 2014
University at Buffalo Career Services Academic Job Search and Talk Spring 2014
University at Buffalo Career Services Academic Job Search and Talk Spring 2014
University at Buffalo Career Services Academic Job Search and Talk Spring 2014
University at Buffalo Career Services Academic Job Search and Talk Spring 2014
University at Buffalo Career Services Academic Job Search and Talk Spring 2014
University at Buffalo Career Services Academic Job Search and Talk Spring 2014
University at Buffalo Career Services Academic Job Search and Talk Spring 2014
University at Buffalo Career Services Academic Job Search and Talk Spring 2014
University at Buffalo Career Services Academic Job Search and Talk Spring 2014
University at Buffalo Career Services Academic Job Search and Talk Spring 2014
University at Buffalo Career Services Academic Job Search and Talk Spring 2014
University at Buffalo Career Services Academic Job Search and Talk Spring 2014
University at Buffalo Career Services Academic Job Search and Talk Spring 2014
University at Buffalo Career Services Academic Job Search and Talk Spring 2014
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University at Buffalo Career Services Academic Job Search and Talk Spring 2014

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  • 1. The Academic Job Search Life & Learning Workshop March 3, 2014 UB Career Services Bob Orrange Associate Director 716.645.2231 ub-careers.buffalo.edu
  • 2. Today’s Agenda • The Academic Job Search – General Advice • The Job Talk – What is it? • NOTE: This workshop is designed for those pursuing a research or faculty position in a university/college or a higher education related research facility.
  • 3. General Job Search Advice • Network! Talk to people about your situation (listen to them talk about theirs, too!) • Get business cards made & pass them out! • Attend conferences • Join professional associations • Submit papers for publications • Formalize your website & social media presence • Google “Academic Job Search” • Be prepared to be interviewed on short notice
  • 4. General Job Search Advice • Look for online postings: – Career Services website – ub-careers.buffalo.edu/jobintern.php#highered – Higher Ed Jobs – www.higheredjobs.com – Academic Careers Online – www.academiccareers.com – The Chronicle of Higher Education – http://chronicle.com/section/Jobs/61/ • Don’t “only” look for online postings! – Remember to network!
  • 5. General Job Search Advice • Get your job search papers ready: – Cover Letter/Statement of Interest – Curriculum Vitae/Resume • • • • • • • • Education Courses taught Awards/Grants Publications Presentations Research/Lab work Affiliations Languages/Computer Skills – Teaching Philosophy/Research Intentions – Letters of Recommendation • Ask now!
  • 6. General Job Search Advice • Cover letters – Cover letters should be individually written for a specific institution/department. No form letters! – They need to demonstrate your knowledge of and interest in that particular opportunity. – Cover letters (& CV’s) should generate interest in you! The reader should want to meet you! – They should be visually pleasing with no grammatical errors or typos!
  • 7. General Job Search Advice • Statement of Interest (in the position) This statement is similar in nature to your personal statement for graduate school admissions and is a good basis for your Job Talk presentation. Include the following: • Introduction • Your Research/Academic History • Current Situation • Future Research/Teaching Goals
  • 8. General Job Search Advice • • • • • Apply past the deadline. What have you got to lose? Use your Career Center! Be creative. Try something different. Send thank-you notes! Know your strengths and weaknesses! – What are your three “best” areas of strength? – How are you dealing with a perceived weakness?
  • 9. General Job Search Advice • Read everything you can about the institution. • Demonstrate that you have knowledge of the type of institution to which you are applying. – – – – Research or teaching emphasis Private or public Religious affiliation Reputation in the community
  • 10. General Job Search Advice • Closely monitor the departmental website(s). • Know the department’s specialties. • Know where the dean/chair/faculty went to school and what they studied. • Know something about each faculty member in the department. – Their specialties, reputation, research interests, etc. • Ideally - find out something about the department and faculty members that they didn’t think you would know!
  • 11. General Job Search Advice • Dig deeper! - Research the department's faculty in terms of research, grant money, and scholarly output via “Web of Science” or other databases. – Read/skim their books/articles. – Create a personal connection between your research and theirs. • Use other electronic databases such as LexisNexis. • Ask a librarian to help!
  • 12. General Job Search Advice • Put yourself in an employer’s mindset: – What would you want in a candidate? – How would you want to be approached? – Do you have the general skills & qualities institutions are seeking in your field? – Do you know the current “buzz” words in your field? – Think in terms of how you can meet the needs of the department - not just what they can do for you.
  • 13. General Job Search Advice • Determine what courses you could realistically teach (ongoing, new)? – Don’t say “Any!” • Play the Match Game! – How do your skills, experience, education, & research match what the department/institution is seeking in a candidate?
  • 14. General Job Search Advice • When interviewing ask questions: – – – – – What’s the expected teaching load? How many Master’s students get PhD’s? Post Docs? What’s the policy on Junior faculty release time? What is the average startup funds for research? Discuss lab facilities: • How much space would you have? • What type of equipment, computer, etc.? – Will you have a GA, RA, TA?
  • 15. General Job Search Advice • More items to ask about: – Tenure process – Mentor process • Ask to speak with a grad student. • Work out travel & expense arrangements in advance.
  • 16. General Job Search Advice • Don’t ask about salary until an offer is made (or at least wait until further along in the process). – Salaries are public in public schools. – Check that university’s library for specific salary information for that school. – Go to www.Salary.com. • Don’t ask questions for which you should already know the answer: – How many students are enrolled? – Do you have many sections for freshmen? – Do you play football here?
  • 17. General Job Search Advice • Search Committees: – – – – – – Usually consist of 5-8 people. A few members will be from outside the department. There may be a student member. Some members may know nothing about your field. They want you to excite them. They are trying to determine if you are a scholar, teacher, colleague, star!
  • 18. General Job Search Advice • Overheard at a Recent Search Committee Meeting – “That candidate was disappointing. She had some interesting research, but she couldn’t make a point to save her life!” – “The chair said this next one we’re seeing seemed ill at ease and unprepared.” – “She didn’t start out as my top choice, but she sure wowed me with her presentation! I know the students will love her!”
  • 19. The Job Talk • What is it? – An individually designed presentation conducted by a candidate about “some” of their research usually conducted near the end of an on-campus interview process. – A discussion between the candidate and the search committee to see if there is a “fit” between the candidate and the department/institution and its opportunity. – A time for candidates and potential employers to learn about each other.
  • 20. The Job Talk • What is it not? – A thesis defense – A dissertation defense – A data dump • Your audience is there primarily to learn about you, not your research! • “It’s not the work itself but the spark that you display.” – Dave Jensen, Sciencemag.org
  • 21. Job Talk Preparation • Know yourself and what you have to offer – What are your accomplishments, areas of expertise, research specialties, etc. – Which items most closely match the department’s needs or fit the job description? – Use the position description & course description(s) for ideas on which area(s) to emphasize. • Plan on demonstrating your research & teaching (your communication) skills.
  • 22. Job Talk Preparation • Ask your faculty mentors & others in your field about their Job Talks and interviewing process. • Watch Job Talks on your campus. • Spend time and effort preparing – they are spending time and effort on bringing you there!
  • 23. Job Talk Preparation • Put some thought into possible contradictions of your research. • Identify themes in your research that best display your qualifications. • Think of key words from your profession. • Make a final determination on what part of your research you want to discuss.
  • 24. Job Talk Structure • • • • • • • Introduction – Grab Attention! – The number of Americans living in poverty jumped to 35.9 million last year. Credibility – My name is Grady Student and I have been researching this issue for the past two years. Need – This issue affects everyone in the room today because poverty infiltrates all areas…. Initial Summary – Tell them what’s coming! – Today I will discuss the part of my research which revolves around the economic impact of poverty in the rural United States…. Body/Categories 1. Rationale 2. Methods 3. Results 4. Implications 5. Future Directions Final Summary – So to summarize, I believe that the economic impact of poverty … Questions
  • 25. Support Your Information Here are some ways to solidify your content: •Facts, Figures, Statistics •Authoritative Sources •Current Events •Quotations •Narratives - Tell a (brief) story! •Definitions •Humor - Self deprecating humor works best!
  • 26. Strategies For Giving Information • Go from big picture to small picture back to big picture (The hourglass approach!). • Tell them what is important. Don’t expect them to know! • Use a linear progression: – Past, present, future • Go from a general statement to a specific example. • Build a bridge back to the key issues.
  • 27. Job Talk Practice • Practice stating why you are the right person for the position: “During my residency at the Albany Medical Center, I gained experience in diagnosis and treating mental illness with an emphasis on eating disorders. My background also contains research experience similar to your departmental focus. Let me show you some of that research……..”
  • 28. Job Talk Practice • To prove a particular point have your explanations go from a general statement to a specific example. – e.g. “I have done extensive research on diagnosing anxiety disorders; as an example, at the University Psychiatric Center I oversee the Women and Anxiety Disorders Initiative, which involves…...”
  • 29. Job Talk Practice • Practice discussing your research experience with someone outside your field: “I explored the factors associated with initiation of sexual behavior in early adolescence using quantitative data analysis of 15,000 pre-teens from low income families.” or “I have just completed research on luminescent nanoparticles and their potential applications in bioimaging.” • Ask if they understood your answer!
  • 30. Job Talk Practice • Practice saying: – “Am I making myself clear?” – “Does anyone have any questions at this point?” – “Do I need to further clarify anything?” – “I decided to test my hypothesis” (not prove my hypothesis).
  • 31. Job Talk Practice • Practice in front of diverse groups of people and have them ask tough questions re: – – – – – – – Research Experience Education Goals Strengths Weaknesses Methodology • Academics can be critical (believe it or not)!
  • 32. Job Talk Practice • • • • Record your practice Job Talk on video. Practice with the PowerPoint/Prezi. Practice without the PowerPoint/Prezi. Practice, practice, practice… in front of a mirror, with a friend or spouse, mentor, favorite professor, classmates.
  • 33. Effective PowerPoint Use • • • • • • Use short titles. Express one group of thoughts per slide. Three colors per page, maximum. Use no more than two fonts. Use sound and effects sparingly. Try to use the 6 x 6 guide: – No more than 6 Words per line – No more than 6 Lines per slide
  • 34. Effective Presentations • Content should enhance your presentation not detract from it. – Don’t try to be too flashy! – Write your presentation first. • Information should be self-contained and understood by all. • Clearly label charts and graphs. • Information should flow horizontally. • Don’t clutter the page!
  • 35. Don’t Confuse The Audience! 2007 2008 2009 2011 2013 $3000 $4,000 2,000 .55 (Red) 1,000 Profit 7 6 5 Series 1 Series 2 Series 3 4 3 2 1 0 2007 2008 2009 2010
  • 36. Don’t Confuse The Audience!
  • 37. Job Talk Tips • Be conservative in your presentations’ overall “look” (e.g. handouts, Prezi, PowerPoint slides etc.). • Always use state of the art media (if possible). • Avoid over stapling & over folding of handouts. • Put your name on any handouts or leave behinds. • Handouts or slides should be visually pleasing with no grammatical errors or typos!
  • 38. Job Talk Tips • Acknowledge others’ work in your talk (especially if you use their data). • Use inclusive language. – Watch the jargon! – Define your terms • Don’t be negative of colleagues. • Remember the three “best” things about you that you want them to remember!
  • 39. Job Talk Tips • Review your itinerary; there may be multiple interviews with various groups of people. • Ask about A/V equipment etc. • Bring your own laptop and a jump drive with your presentation on both. • Have your presentation saved in any new and old versions of PowerPoint (or Prezi). • Find out ahead of time the Job Talk time restraints. • From 60 – 90 minutes is the norm (with Q & A).
  • 40. Job Talk Tips • Realize that they want you to do well! • Remember they already like you to some extent. • Who ultimately “gets the job?” – The candidate who most effectively presents themselves & their research. – Usually it is the person who communicates the best! (Good research can’t really “Speak for itself!”)
  • 41. Job Talk Tips • Remember: First impressions matter! • Dress conservatively – wear a well-fitting interview suit in a dark color. • Be sure your shoes are polished and appropriate. • Plan on wearing very little makeup, jewelry, perfume, cologne etc.
  • 42. Reminders • Explain your field of study for the non experts in the audience. • Be sure the data is easy to follow. • Mention possible funding sources. • Connect your research interests to the next 3 – 5 years. • Be a communicator!
  • 43. Sample Resources Acing the Academic Job Talk: Marincovich Gives Pointers – Diane Manuel, Stanford Report Online, http://newsservice.stanford.edu/news/2000/february9/jobtalk29.html Academic Scientists at Work: The Job Talk - Jeremy M. Boss, Susan H. Eckert, Science Careers Forum, http://sciencecareers.sciencemag.org/career_developm ent/previous_issues/articles/3360/academic_scientists_ at_work_the_job_talk Giving a Job Talk in the Sciences – Richard M. Reis, The Chronicle of Higher Education Chronicle Careers, http://chronicle.com/article/Giving-a-Job-Talk-in-theSc/45375/
  • 44. Sample Resources Here are other useful sites: AcademicKeys: http://www.academickeys.com/ Beyond Academe: http://beyondacademe.com/ Sellout: http://ironstring.com/sellout/ Columbia University's Non-academic career options: http://www.careereducation.columbia.edu/resource s/tipsheets/non-academic-career-options-phds-and-mas • For academic careers and even those thinking about leaving the academy: http://theprofessorisin.com/ • Finally, this is a great resource for mostly science-based grad students: myIDP - http://myidp.sciencecareers.org/ • • • •
  • 45. Reminders • Know the position/institution/department. – The more you know about them the more confident they will be in hiring you. • Know your research. – It can not speak for itself! • Know your criteria and priorities (type of position, type of department, type of institution, location, etc.). – Remember, job searching is a two-way street. You’re both looking for a good fit!
  • 46. Reminders A UB Professional Knows Their ABC’s… Appearance: • Professional conservative attire • Alert and engaged posture • Appropriate eye-contact and handshake Behaviors: • Speaks confidently and clearly • Arrives on-time • Appears cheerful and expresses interest • Appropriate usage of social media Career Actions: • Learns all aspects of their job or internship and researches the employer • Always holds themselves to high professional standards • Listens intently and respectfully
  • 47. The Academic Job Search Life & Learning Workshop March 3, 2014 For A Copy Of This Presentation Go To: www.Slideshare.net Search University at Buffalo The Academic Job Search

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