Arc Flash University Session 1, 2013: Advancing the Practice of Electrical Safety

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What’s new in electrical safety? The first Arc Flash University Webcast of 2013 will focus on current developments pushing the envelope in advancing the practice of electrical safety, with information and access to tools and resources you can put into practice today.

Among the topics:
-Trends in occupational electrical injuries in the US – progress brings new challenges
-A new tool for assessing the quality of your electrical safety program – online and free from Electrical Safety Foundation International
-Ongoing evolution in NFPA70E – refinements underway for the 2015 edition
-Changing the Electrical Safety Culture – the 2013 IEEE Electrical Safety Workshop
-Prevention through Design – momentum from the American Society of Safety Engineers (ASSE)
-Educating the next generation of thought leaders in safety – graduate degree in Advanced Safety Engineering Management , delivered online from University of Alabama-Birmingham

Visit www.plantengineering.com to view this as an "On Demand Webcast," download the slides, and to take the CEU Exam. One (1) RCEP / ACEC Certified Professional Development Hour (PDH) available.

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Arc Flash University Session 1, 2013: Advancing the Practice of Electrical Safety

  1. 1. Arc Flash UniversitySession 1, 2013:Advancing the Practice ofElectrical Safety
  2. 2. Related information regarding the webcast:• Download Presentation:http://www.plantengineering.com/index.php?id=7239• CEU Exam:http://www.plantengineering.com/index.php?id=7249• For more information on another Plant Engineeringwebcast visit http://www.plantengineering.com/media-library/webcasts.html
  3. 3. RCEP StandardsPlant Engineering has met the standards andrequirements of the Registered ContinuingEducation Program. Credit earned on completionof this program will be reported to RCEP atRCEP.net. A certificate of completion will be issuedto each participant. As such, it does not includecontent that may be deemed or construed to be anapproval or endorsement by RCEP.
  4. 4. • Lanny Floyd,PE, CSP, CMRP, Fellow IEEEPrincipal Consultant, Electrical Safety andTechnologyGlobal Electrical Safety Competency Leader• Bob Vavra,Plant Engineering Content Managerand ModeratorSpeakers
  5. 5. Arc Flash UniversitySession 1, 2013:Advancing the Practice ofElectrical Safety
  6. 6. Advancing the Practice of Electrical SafetyThis webcast highlights current developments pushing the envelopein advancing the practice of electrical safety, with information andaccess to tools and resources you can put into practice today.1. Trends in occupational electrical injuries in the US2. A new tool for assessing the quality of your electrical safetyprogram – online and free from Electrical Safety FoundationInternational3. Ongoing evolution in NFPA70E4. Changing the Electrical Safety Culture – the 2013 IEEEElectrical Safety Workshop5. Prevention through Design6. Educating the next generation of thought leaders in safety
  7. 7. Trends in Occupational Electrical Fatalities inthe U.S1980-2010more than 70% reduction in electrical fatalitiesCasini, V., et al, Worker Deaths by Electrocution, National Institutefor Occupational Safety and Health, publication no. 98-131, May1998Cawley, J.C., Brenner, B.C., Occupational Electrical Injuries in theU.S., 2003-2009, 2012 IEEE IAS Electrical Safety Workshop,January 30 – February 3, 2012, Daytona Beach, Florida
  8. 8. A hazard for all workers – not just electrical workersElectrical workersOther workers
  9. 9. Lost Time Injuries in the U.S. 2010 BLS Data
  10. 10. Frequency = Severity (US OSHA Data)Conclusions:1. Sprains, strains, tears and MSDsaccounted for 69% of all non-fatalLost Time Injuries (LTIs), but havelow risk for fatality.2. Hazards that account for 9.6% ofnon-fatal LTIs are hazards withhighest potential for fatality. (Fires &explosions, contact with electricity, highwayaccidents, falls to lower level.)Figure 2 Comparison of select Non-fatal Occupational Lost TimeInjuries in the U.S 2010 (U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics EconomicNews Release, 2010)Figure 1 Occupational Fatalities by cause in the US 2010 (USBureau of Labor Statistics)Figure 3 Data from US Bureau of Labor Statistics showing ratio ofLost Time Injuries to Fatalities. Adapted from Anderson and Dnkl,2007 with electrical injury data from Cawley and Brenner, 2010 .132
  11. 11. Low Frequency – but HIGH Consequences• 0.16% of Lost Time Injuries are from electrical contact1• 3.6% of occupational fatalities1• 7th leading cause of occupational fatality1• 1-2% of total injuries, but 28-52% of total medical costs2• (study of one utility)• 2nd most costly workers comp claim31 Cawley, J.C., Brenner, B.C., Occupational Electrical Injury Statistics for the US, 2003-2009, ConferenceRecord, 2012 IEEE IAS Electrical Safety Workshop, January 30-February 3, 2012, Daytona, FL2 Wyzka, R and Lindroos, W., “Health Implications of Global Electrification”, Annals of the New YorkAcademy of Sciences, vol 888, October30, 1999, pp 1-73 “Work Related Electrical Injuries’, From Research to Reality, Liberty Mutual Research Foundation, Winter2010.LowFrequencyHighConsequence
  12. 12. A new resource – available at no cost!An online self assessment of your electrical safety programwww.esfi.org
  13. 13. How Do You Know? Program• Created to raise awareness of and build value forelectrical safety auditing• Provides a three-step process for increasingawareness:Step 1: AwarenessStep 2: AssessmentStep 3: Improvement
  14. 14. Step 1: AwarenessVideosRaise electrical safety awareness at alllevels Highlight critical importance of electrical safety Introduce concept of auditing/assessment Provide personal perspectives
  15. 15. Step 2: AssessmentOnline Electrical Safety Self-Assessment Helps review/analyze electrical safety practices Includes questions related to: Facilities Personnel Procedures Provides a report of suggested areas for review and/orimprovement
  16. 16. Self Assessment Questions
  17. 17. Informational Links
  18. 18. Results
  19. 19. Step 3: Improvement• Self-Assessment results provide a starting point• Code & Standard references included• ESFI workplace safety resource library• Audit follow-up support available from: 3rd party, independent contractors Manufacturer or distributor partners OSHA VPP Program
  20. 20. 2015 Edition Under Development• First Draft Report available on NFPA website• Public Comment closing date May 3,2013• 2nd draft meeting scheduled from June 24- 28, 2013
  21. 21. Anticipated Changes for 2015• Refinements in Chapter 1, Safe Work Practices• Increased focus on Chapter 2 – Safety-RelatedMaintenance Requirements
  22. 22. 22Circuit breakers mustfunction as designed– The circuit breaker– The protective relaying and auxiliaries– The tripping power (batteries or other system)– The trip settings must be those documented in thedesign and in the arc flash studyOtherwise the thermal energy transfer in an arc flash event canbe orders of magnitude greater than that expected.Safety-Related Maintenance
  23. 23. 23The installed fuse must be thefuse documented in the designand arc flash study– Class– Ampere rating– Interrupting ratingOtherwise the thermal energy transfer in an arc flash event can beorders of magnitude greater than that expected.Safety-Related Maintenance
  24. 24. Enclosure integrity is a first line of protection toprevent exposure to electrical hazardsSafety-Related Maintenance
  25. 25. Bonding and grounding integrity is critical to shock protection andoperation of fault protective devicesSafety-Related Maintenance
  26. 26. IEEE Electrical Safety Workshop…an international forum for changing the electricalsafety culture and serving to advance application oftechnology, work practices, codes and regulations toprevent electrical incidents and injuries in theworkplace…• Established 1992, with 35 participants• Next week: ~500 participants, 300+ organizations• Fundamental & Advanced Tutorials• Products & Services Exposition• Standards Working Groups• Expert Presentations• Technical Tours• Extraordinary networkingchanging the electrical safety cultureESW 2013Dallas, Texas • March 11-15, 2013ESW 2014San Diego, California • February 4-7, 2014
  27. 27. What is the best wayto manage craneproximity tooverhead powerlines when servicingthe drilling rig?Permits, training, administrativeprocedures, PPE?Powelines
  28. 28. What is the best wayto manage craneproximity to overheadpower lines whenservicing the drillingrig?Or could the rig have been locatedfurther from the lines – eliminatingthe need for other, less effectivehazard control measures?Powelines
  29. 29. ANSI/ASSE Z590.3 – 2011Prevention………..through Design
  30. 30. Touch safe disconnectdevice replaces traditionalconnections for lightingballastsImpacting NFPA StandardsThis is safer!
  31. 31. The red lead isfunctional, but….• Doesn’t meet currentproduct designstandardsPrevention through DesignExample: Testing & Troubleshooting InstrumentsSubtle but highlyeffective features
  32. 32. Prevention through DesignExample: Smart motor control centersTraditional troubleshootingSmart MCC troubleshootingCourtesy DuPontCourtesy The Dow Chemical Co.
  33. 33. Educating the next generation of safety leadersUAB MASTER OFENGINEERINGADVANCED SAFETY ENGINEERING AND MANAGEMENT• Launched August 2010• Totally Online• 18 Month Program• Curriculum: Prevention through Design Engineering Risk Reliability for Safety Advanced Concepts for Low Frequency/High Consequence Hazards and morewww.uab.edu/asem
  34. 34. Thank YouTel: 302-999-6390Email: H-Landis.Floyd@usa.dupont.comLanny Floyd, PE, CSP, CMRP, Fellow IEEEPrincipal Consultant, Electrical Safety & TechnologyGlobal Electrical Safety Competency LeaderEmail: H-Landis.Floyd@dupont.comPhone: 302-999-6390
  35. 35. • Lanny Floyd,PE, CSP, CMRP, Fellow IEEEPrincipal Consultant, Electrical Safety andTechnologyGlobal Electrical Safety Competency Leader• Bob Vavra,Plant Engineering Content Managerand ModeratorSpeakers
  36. 36. Questions and Answer Session and Exit SurveyQuestion?Type your question in the “Questions & Answers” box on theWebcast console and click “Send.” We will get to as manyquestions as we have time for.Exit Survey:Please take a moment to answer a few questions on our exitsurvey that should pop up on your screen. We use the answersto help make improvements to our webcast program.
  37. 37. Arc Flash UniversitySession 1, 2013:Advancing the Practice ofElectrical Safety

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