Driving Electrical Safety in Your Plant
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Driving Electrical Safety in Your Plant

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The proper use of personal protective equipment (PPE) is a critical component of any electrical safety program, and yet proper PPE use often is overlooked, diminished, or simply disregarded by ...

The proper use of personal protective equipment (PPE) is a critical component of any electrical safety program, and yet proper PPE use often is overlooked, diminished, or simply disregarded by electrical workers in manufacturing. Plant Engineering will present a Webcast on December 5th at 1 p.m. CT that will discuss the importance of PPE to mitigate arc flash dangers and other electrical safety issues.

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  • Normally flammable liquids and gases should not be used around electrical equipment.
  • [Read slide.]You may be involved in conducting audits at your location. Audits help verify what procedures work and where more training is needed. It is also a good idea to get someone outside of your department or even from outside of your location or company to participate in an audit. An outside perspective is a good way to catch holes or weakness in safety practices. EXPERT: Best practice companies follow this routine - Electrical audit one year by in-house person from your plant; next year audit by having another plant person audit your plant and you audit theirs. This cross-pollinates within the company and raises everyone’s skills. Third year, hire an outside auditor. Some companies give a little more time to correct things from an outside auditor or require the plant to justify in writing to the corporate auditor why they disagree with or cannot do what the external auditor suggested. This type of audit program can change a company throughout all its plants in many positive ways.Annual auditing of the qualified workers individually, the written ESP every three years and an annual general audit of safe practices has really been the intention of the committee for quite some time.
  • [Read slide.]You may be involved in conducting audits at your location. Audits help verify what procedures work and where more training is needed. It is also a good idea to get someone outside of your department or even from outside of your location or company to participate in an audit. An outside perspective is a good way to catch holes or weakness in safety practices. EXPERT: Best practice companies follow this routine - Electrical audit one year by in-house person from your plant; next year audit by having another plant person audit your plant and you audit theirs. This cross-pollinates within the company and raises everyone’s skills. Third year, hire an outside auditor. Some companies give a little more time to correct things from an outside auditor or require the plant to justify in writing to the corporate auditor why they disagree with or cannot do what the external auditor suggested. This type of audit program can change a company throughout all its plants in many positive ways.Annual auditing of the qualified workers individually, the written ESP every three years and an annual general audit of safe practices has really been the intention of the committee for quite some time.
  • Continuously monitoring your programs is essential to their successes. Research proves that both training and auditing improves safety; and, they go hand-in-hand. Audits are critical to verifying not only that new training skills are put to use, but that they are working for your facility. Audits also let your facility identify weakness and get an action plan in place before an injury occurs.EXPERT: The study cited showed in general safety (hard hat and safety glasses) that compliance to rules was about 65% before any training. Training increased the compliance to about 70%. Auditing increased the results to about 78% BUT re-communication of the audit results made compliance soar to about 95%. Management commitment AND measurement increases compliance much more than just training alone.

Driving Electrical Safety in Your Plant Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Driving Electrical Safety in Your Plant Sponsored by:
  • 2. Today’s Webcast Sponsor
  • 3. • Hugh Hoagland Technical Consultant, ArcWear.com and e-Hazard.com • Bob Vavra Content Manager and Moderator, Plant Engineering Speakers
  • 4. ElectricalW o r k p l a c e S a f e t y Driving Electrical Safety in Your Plant
  • 5. Top 10 Mistakes Electrical Workplace Safety 1. The 100 cal/cm² Delusion: The “err-on- the-side-of-safety- mistake”
  • 6. Electrical Workplace SafetyHow Bad is Bad? Electrical Hazards – Arc Flash Watch the disconnect door. How much protection would work in this arc? Is over protection a good idea? What works best here, PPE or work practices or a
  • 7. Electrical Workplace SafetyArc-in-a-Box Electrical Hazards – Arc Flash Watch the disconnect door. Arc-in-a-box energy can be two to twelve times greater when the arc is an arc in a box situation. 7
  • 8. Electrical Workplace SafetyArc-in-a-Box Electrical Hazards – Arc Flash Watch the disconnect door. Arc-in-a-box energy can be two to twelve times greater when the arc is an arc in a box situation. 8
  • 9. Electrical Workplace SafetyArc-in-a-Box Electrical Hazards – Arc Flash Watch the disconnect door. Arc-in-a-box energy can be two to twelve times greater when the arc is an arc in a box situation. 9
  • 10. Electrical Workplace Safety“Tracking” Arc Electrical Hazards – Arc Flash “Tracking” arcs are “arcs” which conduct through skin and “pop out” between skin and clothing. • Can cause ignition of clothing in an electrical contact • Usually occurs at higher voltages 10
  • 11. Electrical Workplace Safety“Tracking” Arc Electrical Hazards – Arc Flash “Tracking” arcs are “arcs” which conduct through skin and “pop out” between skin and clothing. • Can cause ignition of clothing in an electrical contact • Usually occurs at higher voltages 11
  • 12. Electrical Workplace Safety“Tracking” Arc Electrical Hazards – Arc Flash “Tracking” arcs are “arcs” which conduct through skin and “pop out” between skin and clothing. • Can cause ignition of clothing in an electrical contact • Usually occurs at higher voltages 12
  • 13. Electrical Workplace Safety Avoiding Mistakes • Overkill on PPE “sounds” smart but it has two negatives – Sends the wrong message – If the workers don’t believe you they may cut corners when no one is watching. – Watch out for salesmen’s little lies… – Better safe than sorry?? – Better safe and right Match PPE to the hazard
  • 14. Top 10 Mistakes Electrical Workplace Safety 2. “We got „dem kits” programs OR “We have coveralls” programs
  • 15. Electrical Workplace Safety Avoiding Mistakes • Making the program cheaper or easier for management or the safety department or for enforcement may not be the most cost effective or the best program. • A natural program that becomes a worker’s habit is the most reliable. • Tends to over protect or not protect at all. • Match the kit to the level – Don’t buy 100 cal kits for everyone. • Arc rated daily wear is better than a “coverall program.” – Darlene’s story Make the program easy for the worker Level 2 Kit
  • 16. Top 10 Mistakes Electrical Workplace Safety 3. The “get-a-Size-12- Class-2-rubber-glove-for- all-arc –exposures” Program
  • 17. Electrical Workplace Safety She needs smaller gloves He needs special coveralls/suits
  • 18. Top 10 Mistakes Electrical Workplace Safety 4. The “Flame Resistant(FR)-labeled- clothing-is-all-I-need-in- the-electric-arc” delusion.
  • 19. Electrical Workplace SafetyArc Rated or “FR”? Arc-Rated PPE – Clothing Vertical Flame Test (ASTM D6413) not good enough alone.
  • 20. Electrical Workplace Safety Arc-Rated PPE – Clothing Beware of: • “FR until washed or dry cleaned” • Melting “FR” • “FR-treated” acrylics, polyester, nylon Got Arc-Rating? Because of the misuse of the term FR, NFPA 70E removed the term favoring arc-rated.
  • 21. Electrical Workplace Safety“FR” Melted Onto the Head Arc-Rated PPE – Clothing
  • 22. Electrical Workplace SafetyRainwear Arc-Rated PPE – Clothing Not all FR rainwear is arc rated. Any FR rainwear with a melting substrate will usually increase worker injury.
  • 23. Top 10 Mistakes Electrical Workplace Safety 5. “We bought this PowerPoint” Programs
  • 24. Electrical Workplace Safety • Generic training doesn’t always get to the finer points. • Site specific written programs are critical • Unique hazards must be considered – FR cotton and 20% body burns from sodium hypochlorite. – Aramids and welding spatter. – Melting polyester in cleanrooms. • Train + Audit + Knowledgeable Management = A Great Program
  • 25. Top 10 Mistakes Electrical Workplace Safety 6. The “buy-everyone-an- arc-flash-suit-and-do- calculations-later” delusion
  • 26. Electrical Workplace Safety • Assessment will not change the level of protection but it will change how often you need to wear it. • Don’t put off PPE purchases waiting on assessment • Daily wear for all electrical workers • Suits for high level exposures • Operators work in natural fiber or are rated gear depending on level of exposure. Don’t put off PPE purchase but
  • 27. Top 10 Mistakes Electrical Workplace Safety 7. Focusing on Arc Flash rather than Shock
  • 28. Electrical Workplace Safety • Shock is the number one killer of the electrical hazards. • More bang for the buck with right PPE than engineering. Most important engineering is done by proper installations, maintenance then equipment upgrades. Engineering out the arc flash hazard is not always an option.
  • 29. Top 10 Mistakes Electrical Workplace Safety 8. Ignore specialty Gear
  • 30. Electrical Workplace Safety Avoiding Mistakes • ASTM F1506 – Hairnets/beardnets – Cleanroom gear – Gloves (Proposed separate Standard) – Disposable FR Wear • ASTM F1891 – Rainwear – Chemical gear + Chemical Standard • ASTM D2413 + D1116 – Shoes (EH or DI or leather, etc.) • Other Specialty PPE must be evaluated by the AHJ Don’t forget specialty gear
  • 31. Top 10 Mistakes Electrical Workplace Safety 9. Safety Department Can Do it On Our Own, Safety Myopia: “The Daisy Chain Delusion”
  • 32. Electrical Workplace Safety Avoiding Mistakes • The five people you need to do proper hazard assessment for electrical – Trouble making electrician – Nicest electrician – Smartest electrician – Electrical Engineer – Safety Person The Electrical Safety Team
  • 33. Electrical Workplace Safety Safety-Related Work Practices Sometimes we only look for what we know… Daisy chaining power cords is prohibited by OSHA, Sir.
  • 34. Electrical Workplace Safety Three Types of Audits Required Observations required to do the following: • Identifies: • Demonstrate task proficiency • Retraining needs • Supervisory level • Part of evaluating Qualified Persons Supervisory Safe Work Practice Inspection NFPA 70E 110.2(D)(1)(f) Minimum annual supervisory work practice inspection to monitor safe work practices
  • 35. Electrical Workplace Safety Three Types of Audits Required Better practice: Separate from Supervisory Audit. Observations required to do the following: • Prove procedures work • Identify: • Procedures that don’t work • Changes that should be made • Retraining needs Annual Field Work Audit Site audit looks at the site’s practices and could include NEC auditing and NFPA/OSHA auditing 110.4 (H)(2) Best practice: Separate from Supervisory Audit. • Year One: Internal by local safety/electrical dept. • Year Two: Cross- pollinate using another professional from another plant or industry • Year Three: Outside Audit by competent auditor
  • 36. Electrical Workplace SafetyTraining, Auditing, & Reporting Effects Safety-Related Work Practices 50 60 70 80 90 100 Baseline Training Auditing Reporting The Effects of Training, Goal Setting, and Knowledge of Results on Safe Behavior: A Component Analysis, Robert A. Reber and Jerry A. Wallin, The Academy of Management Journal, Vol. 27, No. 3 (Sep., 1984), pp. 544-560 %ofCompliance 36
  • 37. Electrical Workplace Safety Avoiding Mistakes • Documented electrical safety program audit (not more than every 3 yrs.) NFPA 70 E 110.3 (H)(1) • Must reviewed Arc Hazard Assessment minimum of every five years. – Updates required if major modifications or renovations. – Required for calculations or if Tables used. – Should include audit of labeling. Electrical Safety Program Audit & Hazard Assessment Audit
  • 38. Electrical Workplace Safety Safety-Related Work Practices Habit 1 Always verify absence of voltage & use VR gloves & tools. Habit 2 Establish worker safety boundaries from shock & arc flash. Habit 3 Always wear arc-rated daily wear and a face shield. Habit 4 Always use GFCI with cord connected tools & extension cords. Habit 5 When feasible create an electrically safe work condition. Habit 6 Plan your jobs, use standards to identify greater hazards, & adopt controls & PPE to mitigate hazards. Habit 7 Measure, audit & continuously improve electrical safety processes. 7 Electrical Safety Habits™
  • 39. Top 10 Mistakes Electrical Workplace Safety 10. Fill in the Blank...
  • 40. Electrical Workplace Safety Electrical Workplace Safety *Newsletter is free; charge for DVD. www.e-hazard.com Email: questions@e-hazard.com Phone: (502) 716-7073 For a FREE* copy of our newsletter or information about our DVD’s: Text: “DVD” or “Newsletter” with your e-mail address to: 925-Arc-Wear (925-272-9327) Questions? Want More Information?
  • 41. Electrical Workplace Safety For more information on electrical arc PPE, for help on selecting the proper arc PPE or for a custom quote, Contact your local Magid Glove & Safety Sales Representative 1-800-444-8030
  • 42. • Hugh Hoagland Technical Consultant, ArcWear.com and e-Hazard.com • Bob Vavra Content Manager and Moderator, Plant Engineering Speakers
  • 43. Thanks Today’s Webcast Sponsor
  • 44. Driving Electrical Safety in Your Plant Sponsored by: