Carlos Alcázar - Communication with the new American mainstream population

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Carlos Alcázar - Communication with the new American mainstream population

  1. 1. Communication with the New AmericanMainstream Population Plain Talk September 7, 2012 Carlos Alcázar Hispanic Communications Network
  2. 2. Cultural SHOCK
  3. 3. Cultural SHOCK
  4. 4. Cultural Competence
  5. 5. Client Partners
  6. 6. globalchangeOur world is changing faster than it has at any other point in history.
  7. 7. americanchange Philadelphia 61% 39% New York Las Vegas 65% 52% 35% SanFrancisco 48%56%44% Dallas Washington DC 69% 67% 31% 33% Los Angeles 71% Atlanta 29% 61% 39% San Antonio Houston Miami 71% 72% 88% 29% 28% 12% Major U.S. markets are growing minority majority markets Source: U.S. Census Bureau 2009 American Community Survey
  8. 8. Hispanic population growth projected tooutpace all ethnic groups over the next 40 years * Excludes American Indian, Alaska Native, Hawaiian & Other Pacific Islanders Source: Nielsen State of the Hispanic Consumer Report: The Hispanic Market Imperative
  9. 9. Hispanics continue to experience dynamic growth vs. the general populationEvery hour in the U.S. 131 Latinos are born Source: U.S. Census Bureau Population Projections
  10. 10. Younger demographics Median age: Hispanic = 28 U.S. general = 37 Source: Nielsen State of the Hispanic Consumer Report: The Hispanic Market Imperative
  11. 11. Not just the coasts: Hispanics are across the nation Source: Nielsen State of the Hispanic Consumer Report: The Hispanic Market Imperative
  12. 12. Country of Origin: Hispanics
  13. 13. Minority Report 50.4% 49.6% MINORITY NON-HISPANIC WHITEU.S. Census: More minority children were born in US
  14. 14. digital changeNot just a change in populationbut in the wayand number of waysthey connectwith one another Bromley Communications
  15. 15. cultural change Bromley Communications
  16. 16. The psychographics of the New America – NOT about the values tension between a majority and minority culture Traditional Traditional American Values Multicultural Values Individual Achievement Family Interdependence High Reliance On Institutions Low Reliance On InstitutionsExclusiveness Of Extended Kin Inclusiveness of Extended Kin Task Oriented Relationship Oriented Symmetrical Interaction Complimentary Interaction
  17. 17. TheNew America Asian is a complextransculturalecosystem Anglo Hispanic Black
  18. 18. Why not TRANSLATE?
  19. 19. Where’s the “Digital World”?My kid uses the computer for school.So that’s what “other people” do on their computer.
  20. 20. Cub ScoutsDisruptive Boy Scouts VenturingTransformation•Infrastructure + People ¡Dime con quién están•Program y te diré quiénes serán! + Relevant Abre un mundo de oportunidades para tus hijos... Boy Scouts of America En un ambiente sano y divertido aprenden los valores importantes para tener un mejor futuro.•Marketing + Invitation Impulsa a tus hijos en la dirección correcta y velos crecer rectos, seguros de sí mismos, con principios sólidos y gran sentido de liderazgo. La aventura es sólo parte de la diversión… los principios son para toda la vida. Cub Scouts es para niños de 7 a 10 años de edad.•Partnerships + Community Boy Scouts es para varones de 11 a 18 años de edad. ¡Únete hoy! La aventura comienza en Scouting.org CONFIABLE LEAL SERVICIAL AMIGABLE CORTÉS AMABLE valores para toda la vida OBEDIENTE ALEGRE AHORRATIVO VALIENTE SANO RESPETUOSO ©2009 Boy Scouts of America
  21. 21. But what if we make itabout “family values”?
  22. 22. What’s Scouting?What are those words?When do you take my son off to war?
  23. 23. Lifestyle CharactersRelatable Events
  24. 24. Unique Radio Together with Calle 13
  25. 25. One Tiny Reason to Quit:Smoking Cessation for Pregnant African-American WomenRichmond, VirginiaProblem:Infant Mortality rates 4-5 Times Higher Among African-Americans than WhitesTeam:Virginia Commonwealth UniversityNational Center for Minority Health and Health Disparities at NIHCDCyenergy-SMSolution:Coalition-based campaign with social marketing and communityoutreach - founded in researchSepulveda A; Wilson D; Garland S; Dubuque S; Singleton R; Kennedy M. One Tiny Reason to Quit: A Coalition-based SmokingCessation Campaign for Pregnant African American Women. Cases in Public Health Communication & Marketing. 2010; 4: 28-56.
  26. 26. One Tiny Reason to Quit: cepts, the ad agency developed three poten- tial radio spots and several print options. A convenience sample of women recruited Picture 1. Final Creative Copy from area clinics and social service waiting rooms provided feedback on the options and clear favorites emerged. Some of the cam-Tactics: paign planners had different preferences, but became reconciled to following the•Research-based messaging wisdom of the audience representatives once the photo in the option preferred by women•30-second radio PSA’s on urban stations in the clinic had been modified a bit.•Billboards Final strategy•CommunityThe campaign took a two-pronged “mili- outreach•Branded cell-phone-shaped tins of tary” approach with mass media (bill- boards, radio ads, bus ads, print ads) for mints, lip balm and magnet frames “air cover” and outreach workers trained to deliver campaign messages face-to-face serving as the “boots on the ground.” Out-Results: reach workers were recruited from several organizational members of the PHPC that•Significant increase in calls to the quitline serve pregnant women in the City of Rich- mond. Radio ads were placed on the sta-from the target audience tion most frequently endorsed in the focus•Additional learnings groups and rated highest by Arbitron for our target audience. See Picture 1 for the final creative copy.Sepulveda A; Wilson D; Garland S; Dubuque S; Singleton R; Kennedy M. One Tiny Reason to Quit: A Coalition-based SmokingCessation Campaign for Pregnant African American Women. Cases in Public Health Communication & Marketing. 2010; 4: 28-56.
  27. 27. A Growing Community:American-MuslimsCultural Competence in Health Communications:•Religious beliefs strongly influence the Muslim community’sreaction to health information campaigns•Messaging about preventive screening test is a challenge•Privacy and modesty is basic conceptCommunications Campaigns•Must integrate the Islamic perspective•Most health promotion campaigns target risky behavior•Instead reference Quran - it contains health directives•Partnerships with mosquesHasnain, Memoona, MD, MHPE, PhD, Editor. “Patient-Centered Health Care for Muslim Women in the United States: conferenceProceedings and Postconference Evaluation Report”, p. 29
  28. 28. Use of Mobile / Digital / SocialNetworking Amongst Multiracial AmericaHispanics Blacks Asian-Americans54% 30% 59%MORE LIKELY TO USE:
  29. 29. Provided byPaco Ideation
  30. 30. American Heart AssociationReducing Heart Disease & Stroke amongst Latinos in the U.S.Digital: Website, Widgets, BannersMobile: Peer-to-Peer MessagingSocial: Sharing to Promote Behavior ChangeTraditional Media to SupportComedians paired with In-Language Content
  31. 31. What does this mean to you?
  32. 32. Identify your demographicgrowth trends and emerging communities.
  33. 33. Hire to reflect the community you want to serve.
  34. 34. Seek professional advice. Beware of the“Bilingual Cousin Married to the Receptionist Syndrome”
  35. 35. Don’t Translate… TransCreateOr better yet, develop Original and Targeted approaches
  36. 36. Healthcare is the most important venue for plain, simple, and effective communications with our diverse communities.Easy-to-Read...Easy-to-Understand...Easy-to-Use
  37. 37. Carlos Alcázar 202-725-3972 @carlosalcazar

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