• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
Building Effective Screening Services: Understanding the Needs of Programs, Staff, & Families
 

Building Effective Screening Services: Understanding the Needs of Programs, Staff, & Families

on

  • 183 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
183
Views on SlideShare
183
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Building Effective Screening Services: Understanding the Needs of Programs, Staff, & Families Building Effective Screening Services: Understanding the Needs of Programs, Staff, & Families Presentation Transcript

    • Building Effective Screening Services Understanding the Needs of Programs, Staff, & Families
      A Brighter Tomorrow Symposium
      July 19-21, 2011
      Janell Smith-Jones, Ph.D.
      Andrea Rudek, M.S.W.
      Milena Nigam, M.S., M.A.T.
      The Office of Child Development
      University of Pittsburgh
    • Our Community Partner
      Community-based providers
      In-home and center-based services
      Predominantly serves single, minority, and low-income parents
      Parenting education and child development (Birth – 5 years)
    • Why Screen?
      Signs of delay and behavioral issues can be overlooked or dismissed
      Screenings help better identify developmental and behavioral concerns and determine when further evaluation is needed
    • Early intervention (EI) services support children’s healthy development and help them reach their potential.
    • Nationally
      12 %
      Developmental delays
      or behavioral concerns
      (Cooper, Mast, and Vick, 2009)
      2.4 %
      Receive EI services
      (Hebbeler, et. Al., 2007)
    • But, screenings are ONLY impactful if…
      Administered correctly
      Accurately identify children at risk for delays
      Lead parents and professionals to take concrete “next steps”
    • Quality Screening Services
      FOLLOW-
      THROUGH
      COMPLETION
      IDENTIFICATION
    • How Well Are Staff Identifying Children At Risk Through Screenings?
      Identification Rate (% at risk among those screened)
      Appropriate Benchmarks (comparable population)
    • Identification Rate
      Developmental Skills
      Children Correctly Screened (ASQ)
      11%
      Identified as At Risk
    • Identification Rate Alone Is Not Enough
      We’ve identified 11% of children screened
      SO WHAT?
      What does this mean for our service, families and children?
      • Is 11% on target?
      • Does 11% represent missed children?
      Benchmarks provide standards for comparing how well we’ve identified our population of children
    • Benchmarks
      Developmental Skills
      Children Correctly
      Screened (ASQ)
      22%
      of the children should have been identified as at-risk for developmental delays
      conservative estimate based on multiple national samples
      11%
      identified as at-risk
    • Benchmarks
      Social-Emotional Skills
      18%
      of the children should have been identified as at-risk for social-emotional concerns
      conservative estimate based on Ages and Stages manual
      Children Correctly
      Screened (ASQ: SE)
      8%
      identified as at-risk
    • How Well Are Staff Identifying Children At Risk Through The Screenings?
      Identification Rate + Benchmarks demonstrated that children are being significantly under-identified as at-risk across the network
    • How well are staff connecting children identified as at risk to EI services?
      Locally
      Children evaluated by EI
      Children identified as at-risk by screenings
      13
      258
    • What happened?
    • What data should programs collect?
      Children whose parents agreed to recommendation
      Children admitted for EI services
      Children identified as at-risk by screenings
      Children evaluation
      Children recommended for further evaluation
      Children referred for further evaluation
      Children qualified for EI services
    • How well are staff connecting at risk children to EI services?
      Children admitted for services
      Children whose parents agreed to referral
      Children identified as at-risk by screenings
      Children evaluated
      Children recommended for further evaluation
      Children referred for further evaluation
      Children qualified for services
      8
      13
      10
      47
      57
      90
      2
      2
      21
      258
      1
      9
      13
      31
      1
      55
      2
      113
      No
      Data Missing in MIS
    • How well did staff connect at risk children to EI services?
      Children admitted for services
      Children whose parents agreed to referral
      Children evaluated
      Children identified as at-risk by screenings
      Children recommended for further evaluation
      Children referred for further assessment
      Children qualified for services
      8
      13
      10
      47
      57
      90
      258
      5%
      3%
    • Detailed documentation of the service delivery process can reveal areas where quality improvement efforts are needed by showing the breakdowns
      in connecting children to EI services.
      What might the breakdowns suggest?
    • Policy, Supervision,
      Communication & Confidence
      Children admitted for services
      Children whose parents agreed to referral
      Children identified as at-risk by screenings
      Children evaluated
      Children recommended for further referral
      Children referred for further assessment
      Children qualified for services
      8
      13
      10
      47
      57
      90
      2
      2
      21
      258
      1
      9
      13
      31
      1
      55
      2
      113
      No
      Data Missing in MIS
    • Communication, Confidence, & Support
      Children
      whose
      parents
      agreed to referral
      Children admitted for services
      Children identified as at-risk by screenings
      Children evaluated
      Children recommended for further evaluation
      Children referred for further evaluation
      Children qualified for services
      8
      13
      10
      47
      57
      90
      2
      2
      21
      258
      1
      9
      13
      31
      1
      55
      2
      113
      No
      Data Missing in MIS
    • Communication & Support
      Children admitted for services
      Children whose parents agreed to referral
      Children evaluated
      Children identified as at-risk by screenings
      Children referred
      for
      further evaluation
      Children recommended for further evaluation
      Children qualified for services
      8
      10
      13
      47
      57
      90
      2
      2
      21
      258
      1
      9
      13
      31
      1
      55
      2
      113
      No
      Data Missing in MIS
    • Data Alone Cannot Explain Why
    • Communicating Findings with Stakeholders
      • Facilitates critical thinking
      • Generates relevant questions
      • Provides insight not offered by the data alone
      • Educates and empowers
      • Informs planning and decision making
    • Dashboards
      Big-picture view
      Most essential information
      Streamlined, simple, and digestible
      What does this information mean for an individual child and family?
    • Sample Identification Rate Dashboard
      Using the ASQ to Identify Children At-Risk for Developmental Delay
      1020
      1020children received one ASQ
      (109 children’s records did not meet the criteria for a correct ASQ)
      483
      children
      911
      89% of the 1020 children screened received the correct ASQ
      191
      22% of the 911 children should have been identified as at-risk for developmental delays
      (conservative estimate based on multiple national samples)
      97
      11% of the 911 children were identified as at-risk
    • Sample Follow-Through Dashboard
      What happened to the children identified as at-risk for delay?
      Children whose parents agreed to referral
      Children evaluated
      Children identified as at-risk by screenings
      Children admitted for services
      Children qualified for services
      Children recommended for further evaluation
      Children referred for further evaluation
      8
      13
      10
      47
      57
      90
      2
      2
      21
      258
      1
      9
      13
      31
      1
      55
      2
      113
      No
      Data Missing in MIS
    • What Works?Listening to the Voices of Stakeholders
      • Screening staff
      • Administrative and supervisory staff
      • Parents
      • Other experts associated with screening, assessment, and referral services
    • Boosting Competence and Confidence Staff Needs
      • Clearly defined and communicated policies and procedures
      • Training and professional development
      Value and benefit of screenings and EI
      Communicating difficult and sensitive information
      Supporting families: understanding the parent perspective is critical
      • Supervision and mentoring
    • Understanding the Caregiver PerspectiveCaregiver Needs
      Recognize, acknowledge, and normalize feelings
      Strengths-based approach
      Create a partnership
      Parents are in control
      School readiness focus
    • Dee Dee and Dahnayl
    • It is critical to have systems in place to monitor the impact of screening services and to identify improvement needs and opportunities.
    • Discussion
      How can your program utilize currently collected data to better understand the quality of your screening service?
      What current challenges impact your program’s screening service?
      How can programs successfully address the needs of staff who provide screening, and EI referral and coordination services to families?
      How can programs successfully support families through the screening service and EI referral and coordination process?
      How can programs involve stakeholders in improving:
      the capacity of programs and staff; and
      the quality of screening services and supports provided to families?
    • Building Effective Screening Services Understanding the Needs of Programs, Staff, and Families
      For additional questions, please contact us:
      Janell Smith-Jones janells@pitt.edu
      Andrea Rudekarudek@pitt.edu
      Milena Nigam mkn11@pitt.edu
      Developmental Screening and EI — OCD Webpage