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Creating an Influential & Credible  Personal Brand in Social Media
<ul><li>Wynona Redmond, President </li></ul><ul><li>Deborah Hyman, Executive Vice President, moderator </li></ul><ul><li>R...
Elizabeth Lupfer is a geeky-cool, die-hard internet strategist with over 12 years of web experience that blends serious te...
<ul><li>Know the value of building, promoting and monitoring your personal brand </li></ul><ul><li>Learn tactics on what y...
<ul><li>It directs our daily efforts and impacts everything we do — from the content we create, to how we interact and con...
<ul><li>If you have a name, you have a personal brand </li></ul><ul><li>Amplify what makes you great. </li></ul><ul><li>Di...
<ul><li>Blog / website:  Rank yourself higher in search engines and lend more to your expertise and interest areas over ti...
<ul><li>Twitter:  Tweet and retweet relevant information. Use Twitter lists to link your Twitter topics or connections to ...
Personal  Branding  Basics
Choose Your Superpower
Expose Yourself Build Your Reputation
Expose Yourself
I n j e c t   P e r s o n a l i t y
Tactics You Should Do and Not Do
<ul><li>Build your knowledge base and keep up to date on best practices, resources and technology </li></ul><ul><li>Follow...
<ul><li>Post versions of your bio and head shot on other social networking sites </li></ul><ul><li>Create a focused blog a...
<ul><li>Promote others even more than you promote yourself </li></ul><ul><li>Guest blog on other sites that are relevant t...
<ul><li>Enforce your brand by filling out your profiles and cross reference them to one another </li></ul><ul><li>Ensure t...
<ul><li>In  a Trust Economy , your market is your community or network,  trust is mandatory  and  influence is king * </li...
<ul><li>Establish differences between your personal persona and your professional one, and determine who will see which </...
<ul><li>Choose ONE professional photo of yourself and use that photo consistently on all of your social networking profile...
<ul><li>Track your SERPs and see what is being said about you </li></ul><ul><li>See negative criticism as an opportunity t...
<ul><li>How to respond: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Don’t </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>If you do respond, do so quickly and respec...
<ul><li>Managing multiple social networking profiles can be relatively easy through automation! </li></ul><ul><li>Use the ...
Your Social Graph: Your Connections
<ul><li>The social graph is the representation of our relationships </li></ul><ul><li>People that you make connections wit...
Finding Balance
<ul><li>Check your ego at the door </li></ul><ul><li>Disclose your affiliation or employment with your company </li></ul><...
The End
<ul><li>http:// www.twitter.com/socialworkplace   </li></ul><ul><li>http:// www.facebook.com/thesocialworkplace </li></ul>...
Thank you for your support! <ul><li>For more information on national and chapter programs or to join, visit  www.nbprs.org...
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Personal Branding: The Power of You - Creating an Influential & Credible Personal Brand in Social Media

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Personal Branding in Social Media presentation from the National Black Public Relations Society's Web Cafe. Presented by Elizabeth Lupfer on June 10.

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  • Work for verizon and also manage a blog called the social workplace. A lot of what I do is related to my personal passion. I absolutely believe in the power of social media as a means to engage and connect.
  • The Silent Observer: Uses social profiles as a form of an online resume, updating work histories Profiling your expertise on LinkedIn and FaceBook (with the understanding personal social engagement on all social networks still requires discretion and responsibility Passionate Participant: unwavering commitment along with a willingness to continually learn new skills and knowledge. If you don’t have passion, you’re likely not going to find the motivation or dedication to build a brand that will garner the attention and respect of others, and ultimately the results you set out to achieve as a valued community citizen. If you are managing your online personal brand to expand your career, your goal should be to convey and build upon everything your real world reputation conveys. Sincerity and honesty are two key attributes that should serve as a guiding compass. If you haven’t recently asked yourself what your strengths are, where your passion lies, and what you can bring to the table in the way of value, you must do it now. All future engagement depends on it.
  • Differentiate yourself = don’t just follow, but lead. if you’re a professional or a student, tap into your power skillset and develop it. Educate yourself on the growing trends, and then start contributing to the conversation. As you grow and develop yourself, and contribute your input, you will become a resource to others, and thereby making yourself a thought leader. Reputation – in your effort to being a resource to others, give your opinion on different topics and provide feedback and reviews. Recognize and recommend others and build a trust community. As you do all of these things, you become what we now call a social influencer – someone who not only participates in conversation, but also helps drive it. As you apply all of these tactics and develop your personal brand… and people will start seeking YOU out, rather than you always seeking them.
  • Build an online presence. In career development and searches, many companies are now searching the internet FIRST to see what kind of social presence potential candidates have. You don’t need to develop a profile on every network out there… think quality not quantity. Think of your social profiles as an online resume. Wonderful presentation in April from Amanda Littlejohn on how to establish yourselves in different social networking sites. So this is not a deep dive, but a reminder of the available sites and how they can be used to support your personal brand. fan pages are visible to unregistered people
  • The single biggest mistake people make is that they either brand themselves just for the sake of doing it or that they fail to invest time in learning about what’s in their best interests. How will you stand out in from others? In order to find your passion, you need a lot of time to think, some luck and you need to do some research online to figure out what’s out there. Consider what you are most passionate about? What do you already know? I’m vocal about the things I’m passionate about. I have no problem calling a spade a spade. I’m highly social. I like to help others and lighten their load when I can. I can be witty within the confines of 140 characters.
  • Building your reputation means building TRUST. And choosing when to communicate publicly versus privately. If the situation is personal (you have an issue with someone else), then send an email explaining your view of the situation and a solution, without getting too emotional. If you’re rating a product online, then you should be an honest critic, and it won’t hurt your brand if you publish your review. When it comes to rating, grading, or forming public opinions of other people, you have to have good etiquette.
  • Be real, genuine and authentic and remember what comes around goes around. Being authentic and transparent in your actions, doesn’t mean you need to expose your whole self to your audience Present your audience with the version of you that best portrays what they’re looking for
  • When establishing a personal brand, don’t forget that you have a personality too! When you participate in online discussions, might like to know that they are interacting with a REAL person – not some autobot. Express yourself online the same way you would offline.
  • (just be careful not to use the networking functions of all these sites, as that could take over your life). No comments Find websites that share your target audience and are looking for content. Then, provide materials along with a brief bio and head shot, and a link back to your website (or to your LinkedIn profile if you haven&apos;t built a site yet).
  • Linking and promoting others is a nice way to show you care about people
  • Understanding exactly how you show up right now will help you build the ideal plan to showcase your value. While researching what criteria people use to form opinions about those they google, we learned that volume and relevance are critical. If someone googles you and there is a lot of content about you, that person assumes that you must have accomplished something and have some information to share. When that person looks further at the search results and sees that that content is relevant to and consistent with who they believe you to be, that person forms a favorable opinion. Your goal, therefore, needs to be to create as much relevant and compelling content as possible. In fact, you want the first three pages of search results for your name to feature you prominently. To start, assess your baseline Online ID Calculator : and make note of your current online ID. You will then be able to see the impact of your personal-branding efforts over time. Blog – use google analytics to measure traffic and referral sources Twitter Grader: check the power of your twitter profile compared to millions of other users that have been graded. Klout: identifies influencers on topics across the social web Facebook Insights – for facebook fan pages
  • Privacy as in YOURS and THEIRS Building your personal brand means choosing when to communicate publicly versus privately. If the situation is personal (you have an issue with someone else), then send an email explaining your view of the situation and a solution, without getting too emotional. If you’re rating a product online, then you should be an honest critic, and it won’t hurt your brand if you publish your review. When it comes to rating, grading, or forming public opinions of other people, you have to have good etiquette.
  • The reach of the Internet is a bit of a double-edged sword: while word of your business can extend far and wide, that also means that your business can earn a negative reputation just as quickly. Situation: An attorney was affiliated with a high profile case in the distant past where another attorney was cited for improprieties. While the attorney was cleared of any accusations, occasionally the subject comes up in various forms of social media (Twitter, Facebook, etc) and they&apos;re trying to figure out how to publicize his side of the story. The attorney cited for improprieties - was that attorney with a different firm? 2. What&apos;s the frequency that this negative publicity shows up in online channels? 3. Who&apos;s creating this negative publicity? The attorney who was cited? Or is this general chatter? 4. If this happened decades ago, what&apos;s the driver that brings it up again? The conversation surrounding it, etc? 5. What kind of impact is this having on your friend&apos;s firm? Financial, reputation or both? Bloggers - The MOST incorrect thing you can do is ask a blogger to REMOVE a post because it is unflattering. Bloggers are very sensitive to free speech issues, and rightly so. The whole essence of social media is user-generated content from social sites, blogs, forums, and reviews.
  • How you react to negative feedback is dependent on the type of comment, who said it, what forum it was said in, and the potential it has to damage your reputation Not every negative comment deserves a response. In fact, you may decide not to respond because you feel the situation is best simply ignored. If the impact is minimal, don’t fuel the fire by pleading your case when it’s not necessary. Respond quickly and respectfully – even if the content doesn’t go away or is retracted, search results will show that you responded to the criticism in a professional manner. Start a positive PR campaign - compose articles about your company and your products. Put your latest market research to work in articles that address all the negative publicity Reverse SEO – If you find that your SERPs display negative information first, Invest in SEO to reverse that by boosting positive feedback or responses - SEO specialists can not only bump up positive reviews but also bury negative publicity so that your company’s reputation remains intact. Take it offline - In some cases, you may want to go to the source and try to work it out offline. A personal conversation may uncover information you would not have otherwise known.
  • Aggregators, feeders Twitterfeed Ping.fm Facebook – status updates can push from and to Facebook and Twitter LinkedIn: slideshare, connect your Twitter account Just be careful that you don’t over-automate otherwise you will end up having the same status update multiple times and people will start asking you why you are reposting the same content.
  • Links are a big deal as they speak to relationships, ties, interactions, and most importantly, trust.  The stronger the link, the greater the trust.  That&apos;s how we Humans work, whether it be in our personal or professional lives.  How can we begin to identify these links and relationships?  Social Graphs . If I can identify that John Doe is a high level contributor based on their social brand, and he is connected to Jane Doe on LinkedIn, Twitter, Foursquare, and Facebook (4 out of 4 potential connection destinations), it&apos;s safe to assume that their relationship is one of a strong-tie.  If I can further identify that they&apos;re not just &apos;connected&apos;, and actually interact frequently through comments, suggestions, online conversation, etc., then I can be certain John and Jane are extremely strong-ties. Given this link, it behooves me to begin investing in that relationship with Jane Doe as well. 
  • Ego – Yes, you’re awesome and you might have intentionally or unintentionally fallen into having a personal brand. However, the corporate brand is much bigger than you. It’s probably older than you and it definitely has more coin than you.  They are backed by investors, engineers, executives, lawyers, shareholders and other really smart people.  They’ve been around for a very long time; long before you existed and will probably outlive you as well. Arrogance - Blatant self-promotion is an example of what NOT to do when talking about the corporate brand. Try and provide value to your peers and community.  Be relevant. “say what you mean &amp; mean what you say” AND don’t pretend to be something you are not. Be smart - your personal brand will grow and grow with credibility. You will become a trusted source of information; maybe even a subject matter expert about the company you work for. Use Common Sense – facebook privacy examples
  • Transcript of "Personal Branding: The Power of You - Creating an Influential & Credible Personal Brand in Social Media"

    1. 1. Creating an Influential & Credible Personal Brand in Social Media
    2. 2. <ul><li>Wynona Redmond, President </li></ul><ul><li>Deborah Hyman, Executive Vice President, moderator </li></ul><ul><li>Richelle Payne, Secretary, Web Café Coordinator </li></ul>http://www.nbprs.org
    3. 3. Elizabeth Lupfer is a geeky-cool, die-hard internet strategist with over 12 years of web experience that blends serious technical knowledge (that would make any geek blush) and business sense that gives her the skills necessary to communicate with key stakeholders at all levels. She also has an intensely ridiculous passion for the power of social media as a means to connect and engage audiences, both internally and externally. As someone who enjoys a corporate job as well as her passion for social media, she has extensive experience in maintaining a personal brand and balancing the two interests. Elizabeth is a frequent contributor to Social Media Today and has authored several posts that have been recognized as &quot;Top Stories&quot; and &quot;Editor's Picks&quot;. Feel free to learn more about her enthusiasm for social media at http:// www.thesocialworkplace.com
    4. 4. <ul><li>Know the value of building, promoting and monitoring your personal brand </li></ul><ul><li>Learn tactics on what you should DO and NOT DO when building a personal brand </li></ul><ul><li>Appreciate the power of the social graph and how you can use it to extend your brand and social media presence </li></ul><ul><li>Understand the sometimes precarious act of balancing your personal interests with the interests of your company </li></ul>
    5. 5. <ul><li>It directs our daily efforts and impacts everything we do — from the content we create, to how we interact and converse online, to wanting to help others by sharing opinions and insight without reservation </li></ul><ul><li>danielmckean [dot] com </li></ul>Passion Drives Us
    6. 6. <ul><li>If you have a name, you have a personal brand </li></ul><ul><li>Amplify what makes you great. </li></ul><ul><li>Differentiate yourself as a thought leader in your chosen field </li></ul><ul><li>Build a solid reputation within your industry </li></ul><ul><li>Increase your influence and improve your perceived value in the marketplace </li></ul>
    7. 7. <ul><li>Blog / website: Rank yourself higher in search engines and lend more to your expertise and interest areas over time </li></ul><ul><ul><li>http://www.thesocialworkplace.com </li></ul></ul><ul><li>LinkedIn: Use it to create your own personal advertising: join groups and contribute to discussions </li></ul><ul><ul><li>http://www.linkedin.com/in/pingelizabeth </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Facebook Fan Page: Target your audience for business or community without having to befriend them first </li></ul><ul><ul><li>http://www.facebook.com/thesocialworkplace </li></ul></ul>
    8. 8. <ul><li>Twitter: Tweet and retweet relevant information. Use Twitter lists to link your Twitter topics or connections to each other </li></ul><ul><ul><li>http://www.twitter.com/socialworkplace </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Ning: Make your brand social, amplify a cause you’re passionate about, or simply forge strong relationships with like-minded people </li></ul><ul><ul><li>http://employeeengagement.ning.com/profile/ElizabethLupfer </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>http://network.hrmtoday.com/profile/ElizabethLupfer </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Google: Create and fill out your Google profile </li></ul><ul><ul><li>http://www.google.com/profiles/PingElizabeth </li></ul></ul>
    9. 9. Personal Branding Basics
    10. 10. Choose Your Superpower
    11. 11. Expose Yourself Build Your Reputation
    12. 12. Expose Yourself
    13. 13. I n j e c t P e r s o n a l i t y
    14. 14. Tactics You Should Do and Not Do
    15. 15. <ul><li>Build your knowledge base and keep up to date on best practices, resources and technology </li></ul><ul><li>Follow thought leaders in your area of expertise as well as in other areas, and see how their ideas apply to you </li></ul><ul><li>Observe audience/community sentiment (positive/negative) </li></ul><ul><li>Stay aware of conversations hiding in Twitter (use Summize.com) and Friendfeed </li></ul>
    16. 16. <ul><li>Post versions of your bio and head shot on other social networking sites </li></ul><ul><li>Create a focused blog about a topic that relates to your area of expertise. Use blogging software such WordPress or TypePad to build a static website if you feel you won't be able to post to your blog at least twice weekly </li></ul><ul><li>Post articles, whitepapers, and other materials to relevant third-party sites (e.g., Slideshare) </li></ul>
    17. 17. <ul><li>Promote others even more than you promote yourself </li></ul><ul><li>Guest blog on other sites that are relevant to yours </li></ul><ul><li>Create brand videos or podcasts and post them on YouTube with URL links </li></ul><ul><li>Tweet and retweet, and acknowledge those who retweet or comment on your posts </li></ul><ul><li>Interact with your followers by asking questions </li></ul><ul><li>Comment frequently (and meaningfully) on blogs that write about you and your posts </li></ul>
    18. 18. <ul><li>Enforce your brand by filling out your profiles and cross reference them to one another </li></ul><ul><li>Ensure that your brand identity (such as logo, colors, backgrounds) is the same across all social platforms, as well as with your print collateral </li></ul><ul><li>Use the same Avatar (profile picture) across all of your profiles </li></ul>
    19. 19. <ul><li>In a Trust Economy , your market is your community or network, trust is mandatory and influence is king * </li></ul><ul><li>First establish your baseline using an Online ID calculator </li></ul><ul><li>Then use free online tools such as Klout and Twitter Grader to track your growing influence </li></ul> Return on Influence – The Real ROI, George Benckenstein Klout Classification Embed Compose Tweet
    20. 20. <ul><li>Establish differences between your personal persona and your professional one, and determine who will see which </li></ul><ul><li>Decide how much you are comfortable with sharing and draw the line on what you will not share </li></ul><ul><li>There is nothing wrong with keeping certain aspects of your life private...in fact, it’s better that way </li></ul><ul><li>Keep in mind that few people trust others who disclose private matters </li></ul>
    21. 21. <ul><li>Choose ONE professional photo of yourself and use that photo consistently on all of your social networking profiles </li></ul><ul><li>Write your bio and use the same one everywhere. Make small enhancements only when necessary for a particular audience </li></ul><ul><li>Choose your stance and stick with it. Don’t go back and forth on your position unless your opinion has truly changed </li></ul>
    22. 22. <ul><li>Track your SERPs and see what is being said about you </li></ul><ul><li>See negative criticism as an opportunity to engage and drive conversation </li></ul><ul><li>Negative publicity can give you the opportunity to right a wrong; it can provide a platform for you to address an issue; and it can make you better at what you do </li></ul>
    23. 23. <ul><li>How to respond: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Don’t </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>If you do respond, do so quickly and respectfully </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>If at all possible, refrain from asking the blog or person who posted the criticism from removing it </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Start a positive PR campaign </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Invest in Reverse SEO </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Take it offline when appropriate </li></ul></ul>
    24. 24. <ul><li>Managing multiple social networking profiles can be relatively easy through automation! </li></ul><ul><li>Use the widgets and tools available to you to push your RSS feeds and updates from one profile to another </li></ul>
    25. 25. Your Social Graph: Your Connections
    26. 26. <ul><li>The social graph is the representation of our relationships </li></ul><ul><li>People that you make connections with on Social Media are likely the ones who can spread the messages for you too </li></ul><ul><li>Social graphs show you a pattern of connections and, more importantly, how and who your followers connect with online </li></ul><ul><li>Social graphs bridge the gap between networks </li></ul>Image courtesy of Joshua Porter
    27. 27. Finding Balance
    28. 28. <ul><li>Check your ego at the door </li></ul><ul><li>Disclose your affiliation or employment with your company </li></ul><ul><li>There is no room for blatant self-promotion or arrogance </li></ul><ul><li>Be smart when you communicate and don’t forget that others’ are watching </li></ul><ul><li>Use common sense in everything you post and everything you say </li></ul><ul><li>Protect company information vigilantly but professionally </li></ul>
    29. 29. The End
    30. 30. <ul><li>http:// www.twitter.com/socialworkplace </li></ul><ul><li>http:// www.facebook.com/thesocialworkplace </li></ul><ul><li>http:// www.linkedin.com/in/pingelizabeth </li></ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul>
    31. 31. Thank you for your support! <ul><li>For more information on national and chapter programs or to join, visit www.nbprs.org </li></ul><ul><li>Mark your calendars for the next Web Café on July 8th </li></ul>

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