“New Dimensions Through CurriculumInnovations Towards Challenges in the             21st Century              March 5-6,20...
ESSENTIAL                                                      TOPICS                                             • 21st C...
“New Dimensions Through Curriculum Innovations     Towards Challenges in the 21st Century                      3/8/2011   ...
“New Dimensions Through Curriculum Innovations         Towards Challenges in the 21st Century  When students are learning ...
What should be change?The general tendency amongteachers to teach facts ratherthan thinking.     Teaching practices that  ...
Our   • prepare our children            for a competitive future.  MISSION     Our      • Functional Literacy for All     ...
CHALLENGES                    1.New needs, NewMaximize the           curriculum .potentials of curriculum  change by      ...
CHALLENGES                              Communication Skills                            Critical Problem SolvingProvide op...
THE 21st CENTURY CORE SKILLSCommunication Skills   Ability to clearly express one’s ideas and       feelings orally and no...
THE 21st CENTURY CORE SKILLSCritical Problem Solving               Numeracy Skills     Ability to make critical and inform...
THE 21st CENTURY CORE SKILLSSustainable Use of Resources/         Productivity           Ability to earn a living   Sustai...
THE 21st CENTURY CORE SKILLSDevelopment of Self and a  Sense of Community   Self-development; self awareness; self-discipl...
THE 21st CENTURY CORE SKILLSExpanding one’s world vision      Knowledge, acceptance, respect and          appreciation of ...
FEATURES OF THE CURRICULUM       New Curriculum Design         Sets high expectations          Rich and Challenging    Dev...
C. Delivery of the Curriculum1.Proficiency in the use of English as the medium ofinstruction as a tool for learning how to...
Objectives     BEC  Curriculum             Feedbacks                                 Content  Conventional            Asse...
Essential         Essential         Content/                     Objectives      Understandings      Questions       Perfo...
“New Dimensions Through Curriculum Innovations Towards             Challenges in the 21st Century                         ...
To begin with the end in mind means tostart with a clear understanding of your    destination. ( Stephen Covey, 1994)     ...
Understanding by Design Template:                 the basis of Exchange           1.The ubd template embodies the 3       ...
STAGE 1                STAGE 2                        STAGE 3           U     Understanding    T     Task                 ...
The “big ideas” of each stage:                                          Standard(s):           Unpack the content         ...
Enduring understanding are statements that clearly articulate big                ideas that have lasting value. Essential ...
Students Learn actively not passive. Educators should consider                           big ideas when designing and deli...
The big ideas provide a           way to connect and recall           knowledge                                       Like...
UNDERSTANDING STAGE 1          Identifying desired resultsSTAGE 1                                          Click to view  ...
What are the common elements of Stage 1                across quarters?                Analyze across quarters the relatio...
Content standards                          What learners should                          know, understand and             ...
STAGE 1: KEY DESIGN ELEMENTS                                       Stage 1 – Desired Results          Established Goals:  ...
• Which define what students            Established                 should be able to know and do at                      ...
• Which specify the essential                                         knowledge (includes the                             ...
• Which express the                          degree or quality of                          proficiency that               ...
• Which are the big and                                       enduring ideas at the heart              Essential          ...
Finding the Big Ideas                                                                              in Skills              ...
TIPS for using ESSENTIAL            ESSENTIAL                                                         QUESTIONS          U...
• Which are open-ended,                                                    provocative questions that                     ...
ESSENTIAL                                        TIPS for using                                                          E...
MATHEMATICS I          General Standard: The learner demonstrates understanding of key concepts and principles of number a...
Established Goals:          Students will understand essential concepts about nutrition and diet          a.Students will ...
You’ve got to gobelow the surface...           3/8/2011   /Mtppelones/UBD/030111   41
to uncover thereally ‘big ideas.’           3/8/2011   /Mtppelones/UBD/030111   42
UNDERSTANDING STAGE 2           Determine acceptable evidenceSTAGE 2                         3/8/2011   /Mtppelones/UBD/03...
When deciding stage two assessment of student                                                    performance, educators mu...
Information on individual                       progress                       Information helps teacher                  ...
Elements consider in identifying evidences to determine           the extent which the desired results have been          ...
Teaching for deep understanding emphasized student’s                                    capacity for meaningful independen...
Facet 1: Explanation                 ability to demonstrate, derive, describe, design, justify             or prove someth...
Facet 2: Interpretation           the creation of something new from learned knowledge,              including the ability...
Facet 3: Application             The ability to use learned knowledge in new,             unique or unpredictable situatio...
Facet 4: Perspective           Definition              “critical and insightful points of veiw.” (WigginsSTAGE 2          ...
Facet 5: Empathy           Definition              “the ability to get inside another person’sSTAGE 2              feeling...
Facet 6: Self-Knowledge          the ability to examine, self-reflect, self-evaluate and            express reflective ins...
A primary goal of teaching for understanding should be the                                    assurance that students can ...
A primary goal of teaching for understanding should be theassurance that students can use their acquired understandings an...
Stage 3 INSTRUCTIONAL       PLANNING                    EFFECTIVE & ENGAGING
[ =======UNDERSTANDING=======]                                                                                       TRANS...
W= how will you help your students to know, Where they are headed,                     Why they are going there and what w...
LEARNING/ INSTRUCTIONAL PLAN    I. EXPLORE                     Diagnose          Activate Prior Knowledge        Clarify E...
LEARNING/ INSTRUCTIONAL PLAN    II. FIRM UP       Provide variety of learning resources          Reflect, Revise or Rethin...
LEARNING/ INSTRUCTIONAL PLAN   III. DEEPEN    Provide variety of learning resources        and differentiated activities  ...
LEARNING/ INSTRUCTIONAL PLAN  IV. TRANSFER    Provide transfer of learning to a new            or different context      E...
Students Learn actively not passive. Educators should                                consider big ideas when designing and...
When deciding stage two assessment of student performance, educators must keep                              in mind the me...
UbDs STRENGTHThe common sense nature of UbDs     principles and strategies  Power to overcome tendency to teach  to the te...
UbDs PROBLEMS & CHALLENGES                               PROBLEMS The need for         Educator’s educators to        misc...
3/8/2011   /Mtppelones/UBD/030111   67
Because teaching is complex, improvements in    teaching will be most successful if they are developed in the classroom wh...
For Inquiries and information  MARIA THERESA PILAPIL-PELONES, DMe-mail/fb address: mariatheresa_pelones@yahoo.com   weblog...
Topic2 understanding by the design at a glance
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For us educators, nothing can be more challenging than the tasks we are facing right now, the infusion of fast pace-technological advancement in the classroom, the differentiated learning, multiple-intelligences, the use appropriate assessment and strategies has brought anxiety and dilemma to all Filipino educators. According to Dir. Andrada, Director of Bureau of Secondary Education “ When students are learning poorly, we cannot expect them to ready for further learning or for work”. We’ve been getting poor results because we are doing what we’ve always done, we need to do things differently and better. What do we need to do together? We need to strengthen the CORE CURRICULUM!

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Topic2 understanding by the design at a glance

  1. 1. “New Dimensions Through CurriculumInnovations Towards Challenges in the 21st Century March 5-6,2011 AVR, MSU-CETD Campus Presented by Dr. Maria Theresa P. Pelones Doctor in Management 3/8/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 1
  2. 2. ESSENTIAL TOPICS • 21st Century School Model • Mission,Vision and Goal • Challenges of the “New Dimensions Through Curriculum ReformsCurriculum Innovations Towards • 21st Century Core Skills • Features of the Curriculum Challenges • Delivery of the Curriculum in the 21st Century • BEC vs SEC • The “Big Idea” of UBD • Stage 1: Outcomes • Stage 2: Assessment Presented by • Stage 3: Learning Plan • 10 Principles of UBD Dr. Maria Theresa P. Pelones • Strength of UBD Doctor in Management • Challenges and Problems of UBD 3/8/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 2
  3. 3. “New Dimensions Through Curriculum Innovations Towards Challenges in the 21st Century 3/8/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 3
  4. 4. “New Dimensions Through Curriculum Innovations Towards Challenges in the 21st Century When students are learning poorly, we cannot expect them to ready for futurelearning or work. We’ve been getting poor results because we are doing what we’ve always done, we need to do things differently and better. -Dir. Lolita Andrada Bureau of Secondary Education Department of Education 3/8/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 4
  5. 5. What should be change?The general tendency amongteachers to teach facts ratherthan thinking. Teaching practices that prevent our children from thinking 3. What should continue (but needs to be taken to a higher level)? • Learning as making meaning • Learning as integrative • Authentic Assessment 3/8/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 5
  6. 6. Our • prepare our children for a competitive future. MISSION Our • Functional Literacy for All • No Teacher and Student GOAL Left Behind • Increase student participation Our • Improve internalCHALLENGES efficiency • Develop 21st century Core Skills 3/8/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 6
  7. 7. CHALLENGES 1.New needs, NewMaximize the curriculum .potentials of curriculum change by 2.The curriculum remains linking it to responsive to national Our increasing development goals.Challenge studentparticipation sand improving 3. Lean is better. the internal efficiency of schooling. 4. Curriculum reforms as a process of continuous improvement. 3/8/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 7
  8. 8. CHALLENGES Communication Skills Critical Problem SolvingProvide opportunities for children to develop 21st Century Core Skills. Development of Self Sustainable Use of Resources/ Productivity Expanding One’s World Vision Sense of Community 3/8/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 8
  9. 9. THE 21st CENTURY CORE SKILLSCommunication Skills Ability to clearly express one’s ideas and feelings orally and non-verbally Ability to Listen Ability to Read, comprehend and respond to ideas presented Ability to write clearly one’s ideas and feelings Ability to access, process and utilize available basic multimedia information 3/8/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 9
  10. 10. THE 21st CENTURY CORE SKILLSCritical Problem Solving Numeracy Skills Ability to make critical and informed decisions Innovativeness and creativity Scientific Thinking Future Orientation 3/8/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 10
  11. 11. THE 21st CENTURY CORE SKILLSSustainable Use of Resources/ Productivity Ability to earn a living Sustainable use of resources (time) and appropriate technology Entrepreneurship Productivity Financial Literacy 3/8/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 11
  12. 12. THE 21st CENTURY CORE SKILLSDevelopment of Self and a Sense of Community Self-development; self awareness; self-discipline; sense of responsibility; self-worth; self realization Sense of personal and national identity Knowledge of one’s history, pride in one’s culture and respect for that others Recognition and practice of civil and political rights 3/8/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 12
  13. 13. THE 21st CENTURY CORE SKILLSExpanding one’s world vision Knowledge, acceptance, respect and appreciation of diversity Peace Non-violent resolution of conflicts Global awareness, interdependence and solidarity 3/8/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 13
  14. 14. FEATURES OF THE CURRICULUM New Curriculum Design Sets high expectations Rich and Challenging Develops Readiness and passion for work and lifelong learning 3/8/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 15
  15. 15. C. Delivery of the Curriculum1.Proficiency in the use of English as the medium ofinstruction as a tool for learning how to learn and improvestudents’ global competitiveness.2. Comparative advantage in the use of Filipino as tool forbuilding and communicating values of Filipino identity andnationhood.3. The use of ICT as integral to curriculum4. Class programming shall be so designed to maximize theutilization of the classroom.5. CP-TLE has been expanded to prepare students for a career.6. Schools should provide variety of CP-TLE Programs
  16. 16. Objectives BEC Curriculum Feedbacks Content Conventional Assessment MaterialsCurriculum Design Strategies The refinement of curriculum followed the Understanding by Design (UbD) framework which covers the three stages: STAGE 1 Backward Design Design of • Outcome (Understanding 2010 SEC by Design) STAGE 3 STAGE 2 • Instructional/ Learning Plan • Assessment
  17. 17. Essential Essential Content/ Objectives Understandings Questions Performance Standards (knowledge/skills)Results/Outcomes Assessment Products/ Criteria/ Performances Tools Assessment Resources/ Learning Learning Plan Materials Activities
  18. 18. “New Dimensions Through Curriculum Innovations Towards Challenges in the 21st Century 3/8/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 19
  19. 19. To begin with the end in mind means tostart with a clear understanding of your destination. ( Stephen Covey, 1994) 3/8/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 20
  20. 20. Understanding by Design Template: the basis of Exchange 1.The ubd template embodies the 3 stages of “Backward Design”BIG IDEA 2.The template provides an easy mechanism for exchange of ideas 3/8/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 21
  21. 21. STAGE 1 STAGE 2 STAGE 3 U Understanding T Task L Learning Plan Q QuestionsBIG IDEA R Rubrics CS Content Standard OE Other Evidences KKnowledge & Skills 3/8/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 22
  22. 22. The “big ideas” of each stage: Standard(s): Unpack the content Understandings Essential Questions standards and ‘content’, s focus on big ideas t a g e What are the big ideas? 1BIG IDEA Assessment Evidence Performance Task(s): Other Evidence: Analyze multiple s t a sources of evidence, g e aligned with Stage 1 2 What’s the evidence? Learning Activities s t a g Derive the implied e 3 How will we get there? learning from Stages 1 & 2 3/8/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 23
  23. 23. Enduring understanding are statements that clearly articulate big ideas that have lasting value. Essential questions are big, open-ended interpretive questions that have no obvious answer Transfer to other Serves as an contexts. organizer for Manifest itselfBIG IDEA connecting in various ways important within facts, skills and disciplines. actions. Provides a Requires “conceptual lens” for Big uncoverage prioritizing Ideas is because it is an abstraction. the concept. 3/8/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 24
  24. 24. Students Learn actively not passive. Educators should consider big ideas when designing and delivering instruction “Big Ideas” are Core Focusing typically revealed concepts themes via – On-going IlluminatingBIG IDEA debates/ Insightful paradox/ perspectives issues problem Organizing Overarching Underlying theory principle assumption (Insightful (Key questions) inferences Q from facts) U 3/8/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 25
  25. 25. The big ideas provide a way to connect and recall knowledge Like rules of a game Like Bill of Rights Parallel PostulatesBIG IDEA BIG IDEA A system of many powerful inferences SAS from small set of A2+B2=C2 Congruence givens 3/8/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 26
  26. 26. UNDERSTANDING STAGE 1 Identifying desired resultsSTAGE 1 Click to view the video 3/8/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 27
  27. 27. What are the common elements of Stage 1 across quarters? Analyze across quarters the relationship between the elements and the purpose each of them serves.UNDERSTANDING Share your observations. STAGE 1 How is the Content Standard formulated? Examine the Performance Standard and specify the performance expected of learners. In unpacking the Content Standards, write in meta strips what students are expected to know (knowledge) and do (skills). 3/8/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 28 menu
  28. 28. Content standards What learners should know, understand and be able to do?STAGE 1 Essential Understanding Performance standards What learners should create/ add value to/transfer? 3/8/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 Stage29 1
  29. 29. STAGE 1: KEY DESIGN ELEMENTS Stage 1 – Desired Results Established Goals: •   What relevant goals (e.g., content standards, course or program objectives, learning  outcomes) will this design address? Content Standards: Performance Standards: • What should students know and be able  •How well must students do their work? to do? •At what level of performance would the student  be appropriately qualified or certified?STAGE 1 Essential Understandings (EU): Essential Questions (EQ): Students will understand that . . . •  What provocative questions will foster inquiry,  •  What are the big ideas? understanding, and transfer of learning? •  What specific understandings about them  • Provocative questions are desired? ‐have no one obvious right answer •  What misunderstandings are predictable? ‐raise other important questions ‐address the philosophical or conceptual  foundations of a discipline  ‐recur naturally ‐are framed to provoke and sustain learner  interest Students will know. . . Students will be able to . . . •  What key knowledge and skills will  students acquire as a result of this unit? •   What should they eventually be able to  do as a result of such knowledge and skills? 3/8/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 Stage30 1
  30. 30. • Which define what students Established should be able to know and do at the end of the program, course, Goals or unit of study; generally expressed in terms of overall goals, and specifically defined in (Desired terms of content and Result) performance standards.STAGE 1 Established Goals: Students will understand essential concepts about nutrition and diet a.Students will use an understanding of nutrition to plan appropriate diets for themselves b.Students will understand their own individual eating patterns and ways in which those patterns may be improved. 3/8/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 31 Template
  31. 31. • Which specify the essential knowledge (includes the most important and enduring ideas, issues, Content principles and concepts from the disciplines), skills Standard and habits of mind that should be taught and learned.They answer the question, “What shouldSTAGE 1 students know and be able to do?”. Students will know…. Students will be able •What key knowledge and skills to ….. will students acquire as a result of this unit? •What should they eventually be able to do as a result of such knowledge and skills? 3/8/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 32 Template
  32. 32. • Which express the degree or quality of proficiency that students are expected to demonstrate in relation to theSTAGE 1 content standards. Performance They answer the question, “How well Standard must students do their work?” or “At what level of performance would the student be appropriately qualified or certified?” 3/8/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 33 Template
  33. 33. • Which are the big and enduring ideas at the heart Essential of the discipline and which Understanding we want the children to remember even long after they leave school.STAGE 1 Essential understanding/ A Big Idea in a Skill area may be considered in terms of: KEY PURPOSE, STRATEGIES CONTEXT CONCEPTS VALUE • The big ideas • What are • What • When to use underlying skills enhances the skill or the skills accomplishers effectiveness strategy performance 3/8/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 34
  34. 34. Finding the Big Ideas in Skills NUTRITION 1. Gives meaning and Topic connection to discrete facts and skills 2. Core ideas in a subjects THEMES CONCEPT • A balance diet • Food Groups 3. Requires •You are what you eat • Overweight uncoveringSTAGE 1 because it is not obvious. Essential Understandings: What understanding are desired? The student will understand that •A balance diet contributes to physical and mental health •The USDA food pyramid presents relative guidelines for nutrition •Dietary requirements vary for individuals based on age, activity level, and overall health •Healthful living requires an individual to act on available information about good nutrition even if it means breaking comfortable habits. 3/8/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 35
  35. 35. TIPS for using ESSENTIAL ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS UNDERSTANDING • Frame the desired Involves the Big Ideas that understanding as full- give meaning and sentenced importance to facts generalization in response to the Can transfer to other topic, phrase ‘ Student willSTAGE 1 fields and adult life. understand that…” •Beware of stating an Is usually not obvious .often understanding as a counterintuitive, are easily truism or vague misunderstood. generality •Avoid the phrase, “ May provide a conceptual Student will foundation for basic skills understand how to….” Statement of conceptual relationships 3/8/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 36 Template
  36. 36. • Which are open-ended, provocative questions that spark thinking and further Essential Question inquiry into the essential meanings and understandings.STAGE 1 Essential Questions: What provocative questions will foster inquiry, understanding and transfer of learning? Essential Understandings: Essential Questions: What understanding are desired? The •What is healthful eating? student will understand that ……… •Are you a healthful eater? How would •A balance diet contributes to physical and mental you know? health •How could a healthy diet for one •The USDA food pyramid presents relative person be unhealthy for an other guidelines for nutrition •Why are there so many health •Dietary requirements vary for individuals based problems in the United States cause on age, activity level, and overall health by poor nutrition despite all the •Healthful living requires an individual to act on available information? available information about good nutrition even if it means breaking comfortable habits. 3/8/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 37
  37. 37. ESSENTIAL TIPS for using ESSENTIAL QUESTIONSTemplate QUESTIONS • Organize programs, courses, units of study and lessons around the questions. “Make the content answer the questions. Have no single Right answer; • Select or design assessment tasks they are meant to be argued. (up front) that are explicitly linked to the questions •Use reasonable number of questions Are designed to provoke and per unit. Make less be moreSTAGE 1 sustain student inquiry, while •Frame the questions in “kid focusing learning and final language” as needed to make them performances. more accessible. •Ensure that every student understands the questions and sees Often address the conceptual or their value. philosophical foundations of •Derive and design specific concrete discipline. exploratory activities and inquiries for each question. •Sequence the questions so that they Raise other important naturally lead from one to another. questions. •Post it in the classroom and encourage to organize notebook around them to make clear their importance for study and note taking Naturally and appropriately •Help student personalize the recur. question 3/8/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 for unpacking •Allot sufficient time 38
  38. 38. MATHEMATICS I General Standard: The learner demonstrates understanding of key concepts and principles of number and number sense as applied to measuring, estimating, graphing, solving equations and inequalities, communicating mathematically and solving problems in real life. QUARTER I (Real Number System, Measurement and Scientific Notation) Stage 1: Results/Outcomes Stage 2: Assessment STANDARDS ESSENTIAL At the Level of Product/ Performance Content Performance Understanding Question Understanding Performance The learner The learner Daily tasks How useful Problems Explanation Assessment of demonstrate formulates involving are real formulated Express numbers problems formulated s real-life measurement, numbers? 1.are real life in different ways based on the following understandi problems conversion, 2.involve real and explain. suggested criteria: numbers, Criteria: •real-life problems ng of the involving real estimation and measurement Thorough •problems involve real key numbers, scientific notationSTAGE 1 and scientific Coherent numbers, concepts of measurement make use of real notation and measurement and Explain how to real number s and scientific numbers. 3.are solved use the scientific notation systems, notation and using a variety calibration model •problems are solved measureme solves these of strategies. and find its using a variety of nts and using a variety degree of strategies scientific of strategies. Physical How are precision Tools: Rubrics for notation. quantities are different Criteria: assessment of Accurate problems formulated measured using measuring Justified and solved different devices measuring useful? Express big and How does small quantities devices. The in scientific precision of the one know notation measurement is when a Criteria: dependent on measureme Accurate the measuring nt is Justified device used. precise? Interpretation accurate? “Tell a Story” of situations where numbers are used or how measuring devices are used. 3/8/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111
  39. 39. Established Goals: Students will understand essential concepts about nutrition and diet a.Students will use an understanding of nutrition to plan appropriate diets for themselves b.Students will understand their own individual eating patterns and ways in which those patterns may be improved. Essential Understandings: Essential Questions: What understanding are desired? The student •What is healthful eating?STAGE 1 will understand that ……… •Are you a healthful eater? How would you •A balance diet contributes to physical and mental know? health •How could a healthy diet for one person be •The USDA food pyramid presents relative guidelines unhealthy for an other for nutrition •Why are there so many health problems in •Dietary requirements vary for individuals based on the United States cause by poor nutrition age, activity level, and overall health despite all the available information? •Healthful living requires an individual to act on available information about good nutrition even if it means breaking comfortable habits. Students will know…. Students will be able to •Key terms-protein, fat, calorie, carbohydrates, ….. cholesterol • Read and interpret nutrition information •Types of foods in each food groups and their on food labels nutritional values •Analyze diets for nutritional value •The USDA food pyramid guidelines •Plan balance diets for themselves and •Variables influencing nutritional needs others •General health problems caused by poor nutrition3/8/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 40
  40. 40. You’ve got to gobelow the surface... 3/8/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 41
  41. 41. to uncover thereally ‘big ideas.’ 3/8/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 42
  42. 42. UNDERSTANDING STAGE 2 Determine acceptable evidenceSTAGE 2 3/8/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 43
  43. 43. When deciding stage two assessment of student performance, educators must keep in mind the metaphor of a photo album rather than snapshots. Effective monitoring of students progress should incorporate assessment tools and processesSTAGE 2 DeterminingAcceptable Evidence Test and Reflective Academic Culminating Quizzes Assessment Prompts Assessment Constructive journals Performance task elements Allows for student Response choice and • Performance- based items Logs • Format • Audience • Topic Independent Listen-think-pair • Purpose application share activities Interviews Self evaluation Peer response group
  44. 44. Information on individual progress Information helps teacher assign grades Teacher with data providesSTAGE 2 picture on how well students are performing in class Assessment Enables students recognize their Provides accomplishment Measure students acquisition of higher order thinking skills Help determine if goals are accomplished Measure student engagement & impact on curriculum program 3/8/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 45
  45. 45. Elements consider in identifying evidences to determine the extent which the desired results have been achieved………… 1. Evidence of understanding knowledge and skills 2. Identify other evidence that will be neededSTAGE 2 3. Use of six facets of understanding 4. Identify appropriate criteria and use them to develop a rubric Stage 2- Assessment Product or Performance Evidence at the level Evidence at the level of Task: of understanding performance Learner should be able to demonstrate understanding of …… using the six (6) facets of understanding: 3/8/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 46 menu
  46. 46. Teaching for deep understanding emphasized student’s capacity for meaningful independent use of essential declarative and procedural knowledge using the six facets of learningSTAGE 2 EVIDENCE AT THEEVEL OF UNDERSTANDING Explanation Self- Interpretation Knowledge Six Facets of Understanding Empathy Application Perspective 3/8/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 47
  47. 47. Facet 1: Explanation ability to demonstrate, derive, describe, design, justify or prove something using evidence. via generalization or principles, providing justified and systematicSTAGE 2 accounts of phenomena, facts, and data; make insightful connections and provide illuminating examples or illustrations. • Questions like :Why is that so? , • What explains such events? , • What accounts for such action? ; • How can we prove it? • ;To what is this connected? ; • What is an illustrative example? ; • does this work? ; • What is implied? SOURCE: McTighe, J. and Wiggins, G. (1998). Understanding by Design. Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development: Virginia. 3/8/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 48
  48. 48. Facet 2: Interpretation the creation of something new from learned knowledge, including the ability to critique, create analogies and metaphors, draw inferences, construct meaning, translate, predict and hypothesize.STAGE 2 • This are narratives, translations, metaphors, images and artistry that provides meaning sample questions are • What does it mean? • Why does it matter? • What of it?; • What does it illustrate in human experience? • How does it relate to me? • What makes sense? SOURCE: McTighe, J. and Wiggins, G. (1998). Understanding by Design. Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development: Virginia. 3/8/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 49
  49. 49. Facet 3: Application The ability to use learned knowledge in new, unique or unpredictable situations and contexts, including the ability to build, create,STAGE 2 invent, perform, produce, solve and test. • Sample questions are: • How and where can we use this knowledge/ or skills or procedures or process?; • how should my action be modified to meet the demands of a particular situation? • It calls for emphasis on performance based learning; work that focus on and culminates in more authentic tasks supplemented with more convenient test. SOURCE: McTighe, J. and Wiggins, G. (1998). Understanding by Design. Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development: Virginia. 3/8/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 50
  50. 50. Facet 4: Perspective Definition “critical and insightful points of veiw.” (WigginsSTAGE 2 & McTighe,1998) What does this mean? A student who understands has perspective. Perspective is when a student can see and hear points of view through critical eyes and ears; know the limits and the worth of an idea; can see the big picture. SOURCE: McTighe, J. and Wiggins, G. (1998). Understanding by Design. Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development: Virginia. 3/8/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 51
  51. 51. Facet 5: Empathy Definition “the ability to get inside another person’sSTAGE 2 feelings and worldview.” (Wiggins & McTighe,1998) The capacity to walk in another shoes including participating in role-play, describing another’s emotions and analyzing and justifying someone’s else’s reactions. • The ability to get “inside” another’s person’s feelings and world new SOURCE: McTighe, J. and Wiggins, G. (1998). Understanding by Design. Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development: Virginia. 3/8/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 52
  52. 52. Facet 6: Self-Knowledge the ability to examine, self-reflect, self-evaluate and express reflective insight, particularly theSTAGE 2 capacity for monitoring and modifying one’s own comprehension of information and event. • The wisdom to know one’s ignorance and how one’s patterns of thoughts and action inform as well as prejudice understanding SOURCE: McTighe, J. and Wiggins, G. (1998). Understanding by Design. Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development: Virginia. 3/8/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 53
  53. 53. A primary goal of teaching for understanding should be the assurance that students can use their acquired understandings and knowledge independent real word situations and scenarios . G= Goals from the real worldSTAGE 2 EVIDENCE AT THE LEVEL OF PERFORMANCE R=Roles that are authentic and final based in reality A= Audiences to whom students will present final products and performance S = Situations involving a real-world conflict to resolve, decision to be made, investigation to be completed or invention to be created. P= Products and Performances culminating from the study S = Standards for evaluating project-based products and performances 3/8/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 54
  54. 54. A primary goal of teaching for understanding should be theassurance that students can use their acquired understandings and knowledge independent real word situations and scenarios . 3/8/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 55
  55. 55. Stage 3 INSTRUCTIONAL PLANNING EFFECTIVE & ENGAGING
  56. 56. [ =======UNDERSTANDING=======] TRANSFER EXPLORE FIRM UP DEEPENLEARNING PLAN ++++ STAGE 3 : THE O T- Tailor - W- E- R- Organize H- E- to for maximu Where Explore Rethink Exhibit students m Hook the is it students and and and Needs, engagem going? Equip Revise Evaluate interest ent and and styles effectiven ess CONTENT STDRD PERFORMANCE STDRD [ ----------------------Assessment--------------------] 3/8/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 57
  57. 57. W= how will you help your students to know, Where they are headed, Why they are going there and what ways they will be evaluated along the way? H= How will you hook and engage student’s interest and enthusiasmDESIGN OF TEACHING STAGE 3 : 7 CORE E= What experiences will you provide to help students make their understandings real to equipt learners for success throughout your unit or course R= How will you cause students to reflect, revisit, revise and rethink? E= How will students express their understandings and engage in meaningful self-evaluation? T = How will you tailor (differentiate) your instruction to address the unique strength and needs of the learners? O= How will you organize learning experiences so that student move from teacher-guided and concrete activities to independent applications? 3/8/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 58
  58. 58. LEARNING/ INSTRUCTIONAL PLAN I. EXPLORE Diagnose Activate Prior Knowledge Clarify Expectations and How standards; products/ performance, criteria and tools are assessed Hook and Engage Student Interest Ask Essential Questions 3/8/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 59
  59. 59. LEARNING/ INSTRUCTIONAL PLAN II. FIRM UP Provide variety of learning resources Reflect, Revise or Rethink their understanding Clarify Expectations and How standards; products/ performance, criteria and tools are assessed Check understanding & content standard , give feedbacks 3/8/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 60
  60. 60. LEARNING/ INSTRUCTIONAL PLAN III. DEEPEN Provide variety of learning resources and differentiated activities Reflect, Rethink, Revise their understanding Express their understanding Check for mastery of EU, feedback & check against content standard 3/8/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 61
  61. 61. LEARNING/ INSTRUCTIONAL PLAN IV. TRANSFER Provide transfer of learning to a new or different context Evaluate product/ performance, against performance standard 3/8/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 62
  62. 62. Students Learn actively not passive. Educators should consider big ideas when designing and delivering10 MAJOR DESIGN PRINCIPLES instruction At the heart of teaching for understanding is the creation of consensus-driven curriculum that clearly distinguishes between and among what is just worth being familiar with what students should know, be able to do and understand. OF UBD The best instructional designs are backward that is they begin with desired results, rather than with instructional activities. UbDs backward design process involves three interrelated stages Students develop conceptual understanding when they can cue into the enduring understandings and essential questions at the heart of the curriculum Enduring understanding are statements that clearly articulate big ideas that have lasting value. Essential questions are big, open-ended interpretive questions that have no obvious answer 3/8/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 63
  63. 63. When deciding stage two assessment of student performance, educators must keep in mind the metaphor of a photo album rather than snapshots.10 MAJOR DESIGN PRINCIPLES Effective monitoring of students progress should incorporate assessment tools and processes Teaching for deep understanding emphasized student’s capacity for meaningful independent use of essential declarative and procedural knowledge using the six facets of learning OF UBD A primary goal of teaching for understanding should be the assurance that students can use their acquired understandings and knowledge independent real word situations and scenarios. GRASPS Teaching for understanding should innovate activities that support indentifies desired results and integrate planned assessments (Stage 3). WHERETO Understanding by design is not a program to be implemented; rather it presents a synthesis of research-based practices associated with improving students achievement.. 3/8/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 64
  64. 64. UbDs STRENGTHThe common sense nature of UbDs principles and strategies Power to overcome tendency to teach to the test and emphasize knowledge- recall learning Ability to provide common-consensus driven language Potential for guiding and informing the process of school renewal and educational reform Ability to guide and inform educator’s effort to unpack standards 3/8/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 65
  65. 65. UbDs PROBLEMS & CHALLENGES PROBLEMS The need for Educator’s educators to misconception The need toreflect on UbD Moving UbD A need to collect, about UbD implementation make UbD framework . analyze and a long disseminate term achievement initiative. data. Ambivalence to framework Confusion Resistance 3/8/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 66
  66. 66. 3/8/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 67
  67. 67. Because teaching is complex, improvements in teaching will be most successful if they are developed in the classroom where teachers teachand students learn….. What works in my classroom might not work in another classrooms. Ideas for improvement is very wide but we need to take the challenge and learn to live in the future and the FUTURE is NOW! Stand up and make a Difference.We must not in trying to think about how we canmake a BIG DIFFERENCES. Ignore the small dailydifferences we can make, which overtime adds up to BIG DIFFERENCES that we often cannot foresee. 3/8/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 68
  68. 68. For Inquiries and information MARIA THERESA PILAPIL-PELONES, DMe-mail/fb address: mariatheresa_pelones@yahoo.com weblog : www.educatorssquare.blogspot.com website: www.pinoyalert.com 3/8/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 69

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