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Underscores the framework and concept of understanding by design, this includes ...

Underscores the framework and concept of understanding by design, this includes
Teacher as designer, The Big Idea
Stage 1: The Desired Outcomes, Stage 2: The Assessment, Stage 3: Learning Plan
10 Major Principles of UBD, Strength of Ubd
Problems of UbD and Challenges encountered by the educators in the implementation of Ubd.

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  • Hi mam,,good morning!,,, I have seen all the slides in your presentation & I find it very helpful for my studies in MA,,specially on my subject Curriculum Development. In leu of this, may I request for a copy,..with your permission..u can can me a copy on my email... russ_escaflone@yahoo.com... thank you in advance & godbless!...
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  • Good day ma'am! im so interested in your UBD ppt. presentation. May I request for a copy of it? I'm a preschool teacher and I just need lots of references about this so called UBD. My email Add is Jhenmartin283@yahoo.com

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  • CLICK INTRODUCTORY VIDEO As a start would like to borrow the qoutation of Stephne Covey (1994), a management guro that is “ To Begin with the end in mind means to start with a clear understanding of your destination” It means that we have to know where we are going to understand where we are now and what probable steps we take so that we are always in the right direction.This concept was considered as the basis in formulating the design… the backward design
  • From the previous statement , it is advise that as teachers we need to create a design that stipulates our own purposes, intentions, plan and execute.Teachers as designers of learning should craft the curriculum that provides varied learning experiences in order to meet specific objectives.It also incorporates an assessment that will diagnose students needs and Starts with much more careful statement of desired results which were guided by institutional standards specifying what students should know and be able to do. In an external standards we also factor in the needs of our many and varied students when designing learning experiences (diverse students interest, developmental levels, large classes and previous achievements must always shape our thinking about the learning activities, assignments and assessments)Good design is shape by clear conception of the vision of desired results It means that we must be able to state with clarity what the students should understand and be able to do as a result of any plan and irrespective of any constraints we face.To understand clearly, let us discuss the 10 Major concepts and principles of UbD
  • UBD template is designed to help educators become more circumspect(cautious) and analytic about the desired result. Why? Because our goals are are often as clear as they might be, and different kinds of aims are simulataneously in place in PRINCIPLE 3: At the heart of teaching for understanding is the creation of consensus-driven curriculum that clearly distinguishes between and among what is just worth being familiar with what students should know, be able to do and understand.PRINCIPLE 4: The best instructional designs are backward that is they begin with desired results, rather than with instructional activities.
  • UbDs backward design process involves three interrelated stagesStage1: Identify desired results such as Enduring understanding, essential questions and enabling knowledge objectives. On this stage, we encounter the unpacking of content standards and content focus on the “big ideas”Stage 2 :Determine acceptable evidence to assess and to evaluate student acheivement of desired results. It analyzes multiple sources of evidence in congruence with stage 1Stage 3: Plan experiences and instruction this is to promote students mastery of their subsequent success on identified assessment tasks. We have to derive the implied learning we underscores in Stage 1 & 2
  • For stage 1, we incorporate the Essential Understanding and Essential Questions, Content Standards vis-a-vi Performance standardsStage 2, highlighted the task, rubrics and other evidences in a portfolioStage 3 is the learning plan
  • Goalsmeans a formal, long-term goals also called the desired results that establishes priorities for instruction and assessment. These are inherently abiding aims, providing rationale for the short-term goals that are lesson and unit specifics.Example: Students will understand essential concepts about nutrition and dietStudents will use an understanding of nutrition to plan appropriate diets for themselvesStudents will understand their own individual eating patterns and ways in which those patterns may be improved.
  • ESSENTIAL UNDERSTANDINGS- these are big ideas and enduring ideas (something that will last) at the heart of the discipline.Are they the big and enduring ideas drawn from the disciplineDo they reflect the major problems, issues and themes that are deemed most important for students to learn?Main idea or Essential Understanding may be considered as Key Concepts – the Big Ideas underlying the skill performancePurpose, Value – what a skill should be accomplishesStrategy, Tactics – what enhances effectivenessContext – when to use the skill or strategy
  • ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS – these are open-ended, provocative questions that spark thinking and further inquiry into the essential meanings and understandings.Do they center around the major understanding, problem, issues or theme?Do they unpack the essential understandungs?Are they relevant to students lives?Do they provide enough challenge or rigor?Are they manageable; not too demanding of time or resources?Are they suitable to the target student’s age, interest and abilities?NOTE : By asking essential questions, we are encouraging teachers to avoid coverage and to commit genuine inquiry in a form of (a) discussion (b) reflection, © problem solving (d) research and (e) debate that are requisites for developing deep understanding of essential ideas.
  • CLICK TO VIEW THE VIDEOWhat have you learned from the video?
  • PRINCIPLE 7 : focuses onSTAGE TWO: Determines Acceptable evidences- It defines acceptable evidence of student’s attainment of desired results.It determines authentic performance tasks that the students is expected to do to demonstrate the desired understandings.It defines the criteria against which the student’s performance or products shall be judged.When designing stage two assessment of student performance, educators must keep in mind the metaphor of a photo album rather than snapshots.Evidences can either beTest and Quizzes like constructive-response( performance based) items rathenexclusice use of selected-response items like (True or false, fill-in the blanks or multiple choice)Reflective Assessment like journals, logs, pair/share activities, interviews, self-evaluation, peer response groupAcademic Prompt – that clearly specify performance task elements (criteria, measures) such as format, audience, topic and purposeCulminating Assessment projects that allows for students choices and independent application.
  • According to Wiggings and McTighe Effective Assessment tools provides information on individual learning progress information to help in assigning gradesTeacher with data on how well students are performing as well as the classEnables students to recognize their accomplishmentCan measure students acquisition of higher order thinking skills s.a analysis, synthesis, evaluationEnables students determine if their goals have been accomplished and to set new goals can measure student engagementCan measure impact of curriculum program
  • Explanation- ability to demonstrate, derive, describe, design, justify or prove something using evidence. via generalization or principles, providing justified and systematic accounts of phenomena, facts, and data; make insightful connections and provide illuminating examples or illustrations. Questions like :Why is that so? ,What explains such events? ,What accounts for such action? ;How can we prove it? ;To what is this connected? ;What is an illustrative example? ; does this work? ;What is implied? EXAMPLE: We can state the Pythagorean theorem, But what is the proof, on what axioms does it depend, what follows from the theorem and why is the theorem so important?Facet1 calls for students to be given assignment and assessments ( performance tasks, projects, prompts and tests) that require them to explain what they know and give good reasons in support of it before we can conclude that they understand what was taught.
  • INTERPRETATION – the creation of something new from learned knowledge, including the ability to critique, create analogies and metaphors, draw inferences, construct meaning, translate, predict and hypothesize.This are narratives, translations, metaphors, images and artistry that provides meaning sample questions areWhat does it mean? ;Why does it matter?; What of it?; What does it ilustrate in human experience? How does it relate to me? What makes sense?
  • APPLICATION- The ability to use learned knowledge in new, unique or unpredictable situations and contexts, including the ability to build, create, invent, perform, produce,solve and test. Sample questions are: How and where can we use this knowledge/ or skills or procedures or process?; how should my action be modified to meet the demands of a particular situation?It calls for emphasis on performance based learning; work that focus on and culminates in more authentic tasks supplemented with more convenient test.
  • PERSPECTIVE- The ability to analyze and draw conclusions about contrasting viewpoints concerning the same events, topic or situation.Critical and insightful points of view
  • EMPATHY- The capacity to walk in another shoes including participating in role-play, describing another’s emotions and analyzing and justifying someone’s else’s reactions.The ability to get “inside” another’s person’s feelings and world new
  • SELF-KNOWLEDGE- the ability to examine, self-reflect, self-evaluate and express reflective insight, particularly the capacity for monitoring and modifying one’s own comprehension of information and event.The wisdom to know one’s ignorance and how one’s patterns of thoughts and action inform as well as prejudice understanding
  • PRINCIPLE 8 represents the primary goal of teaching for understanding, this is to assure students that they can acquired understanding and knowledge in real-world situations and scenarios. Culminating performance-based projects (refers to as GRASPS by Wiggins and McTighe) should incorporates the following elementsG= Goals from the real worldR=Roles that are authentic and final based in realityA= Audiences to whom students will present final products and performanceS = Situations involving a real-world conflict to resolve, decision to be made, investigation to be completed or invention to be created.P= Products and Performances culminating from the studyS = Standards for evaluating project-based products and performances
  • PRINCIPLE 8 represents the primary goal of teaching for understanding, this is to assure students that they can acquired understanding and knowledge in real-world situations and scenarios. Culminating performance-based projects (refers to as GRASPS by Wiggins and McTighe) should incorporates the following elementsG= Goals from the real worldR=Roles that are authentic and final based in realityA= Audiences to whom students will present final products and performanceS = Situations involving a real-world conflict to resolve, decision to be made, investigation to be completed or invention to be created.P= Products and Performances culminating from the studyS = Standards for evaluating project-based products and performances
  • A focus on engagingandeffective learning, “designed in”What learning experiences and instruction will promote the desired understanding, knowledge and skill of Stage 1?How will the design ensure that all students are maximally engaged and effective at meeting the goals?
  • PRINCIPLE 9 -Teaching for understanding should involve activities that support identified desired results and integrate planned assessment which is represented by STAGE 3 of UbD design. Wiggins and Mc Tighe identify seven core design principles for teaching in an understanding-based classroom in a template they called “WHERETO”. Each of the letter in this acronyms corresponds to key instructional design questions educators should always consider when planning a learning activities.W- Where is it going? H- Hook the studentsE- Explore and EquipR- Rethink and ReviseE- Exhibit and EvaluateT- Tailor to students Needs, interest and stylesO- Organize for maximum engagement and effectiveness
  • Where are we headed?” (the student’s Q!) How will the student be ‘hooked’?What opportunities will there be to be equipped, and to experience and explore key ideas?What will provide opportunities to rethink, rehearse, refine and revise?How will students evaluate their work?How will the work be tailored to individual needs, interests, styles?How will the work be organized for maximal engagement and effectiveness?
  • Principle 10 Understanding by design is not a program to be implemented; rather it presents a synthesis of research-based practices associated with improving students achievement. Successful UbD learning organizations are collaborative communities that emphasize practioner inquiry that includes;PEER COACHING- professional colleagues support one another by scripting lessons, providing feedbacks and engaging in cognitive coaching (shared inquiry designed to align staff members perceptions and judgments)STUDY GROUPS – Colleagues study a text or explore an issue together and pool their experiences, reflections and resources for understandingINQUIRY TEAMS: Colleagues focus their study on shared student achievement issue or organizational problem that they wish to investigate together as an extension of their initial study group discussionsACTION RESEARCH COHORTS: Colleagues identify a research problem, hypothesis or inquiry question concerning their learning organization, collect, analyze and present available data develop and implement an action plan related to identified solutions and interventions and revides and modify their plan to reinforce a commitment to continuous improvement.
  • What do you consider to be the greatest strengths of UbD?UbD is a philosophy for teaching and learning. Once you get it it is very difficult to go back to creating disconnected activities or covering facts without a broader context.It help provide a narrative content or skillsUbd three stage design serves as a coherent guide for unit or lesson planning that teachers have a comfort level with.Focus on enduring understanding, we are challenge to provide instruction with a long term results.
  • PROBLEMSThe need for educators to reflect on UbD framework .ResistanceConfusionAmbivalence to frameworkEducator’s misconception about UbDMoving UbD implementationA need to make UbD a long term initiative.The need to collect, analyze and disseminate achievement data.

Topic2 understanding by the design at a glance Presentation Transcript

  • 1. “New Dimensions Through Curriculum Innovations Towards Challenges in the 21st Century March 5-6,2011 AVR, MSU-CETD Campus Teacher as designer The “Big Idea”Topic 2 Stage 1: Outcomes Stage 2: Assessment Stage 3: Learning Plan 10 Principles of UBD Strength of UBD Presented by Challenges & Problems of Dr. Maria Theresa P. Pelones UBD Doctor in Management 3/7/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 1
  • 2. [Click to view the video] To begin with the end inmind means to start with a clear understanding of your destination. ( Stephen Covey, 1994) 3/7/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 2
  • 3. Design  Teachers are designers an essential act means to of our profession is the crafting of our curriculum and learning experiences to have meet specific purposes. purposes and intentions; to plan and  designers of assessments toBACKWARD execute (Oxford English Dictionary) diagnose student needs that DESIGN guides our teaching and to enable us, our students and others to determine whether we achieve our goals  Good Design are shape by clear  designers should start with much more conception careful statement of the desired result-the of the priority learnings- and to derive the vision of curriculum from the performances called for or implied in the goals desired results. 3/7/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 3
  • 4. Why “backward”? The stages are logical but they go against habitsBACKWARD DESIGN By thinking through We’re used to the assessments jumping to lesson upfront, we ensure and activity ideas - greater alignment before clarifying of our goals and our performance means, and that goals for students teaching is focused on desired results 3/7/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 4
  • 5. Students Learn actively not passive. Educators should consider big ideas when designing and delivering instruction Learning depends in 3 Students learn best dominant brain functions Student culture, when they actively (1) innate search for learning experiences and construct meaning (2) ongoing connection bet previous knowledge emotion and cognition thru experience-based shape all new learning learning activities (3) innate disposition to find patterns in learningBIG IDEA Learning is heavily situated; students Student learn best when Knowing or being able studying a curriculum application and to do something does replaces simple coverage transfer of learning to with in-dept inquiry and not guarantee that the new situations and with independent learner understands it. context does not application experiences. occur automatically Student benefit from curriculum that cues them into big ideas, enduring understandings and essential questions 3/7/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 5
  • 6. Enduring understanding are statements that clearly articulate big ideas that have lasting value. Essential questions are big, open-ended interpretive questions that have no obvious answer Transfer to other contexts. Serves as anBIG IDEA organizer for Manifest itself in connecting various ways important facts, within disciplines. skills and actions. Provides a Requires “conceptual Big uncoverage lens” for Ideas is because it is an prioritizing the abstraction. concept. 3/7/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 6
  • 7. 10 Major Design Principles of UbD Students Learn actively not passive. Educators should consider big ideas when designing and delivering instruction “Big Ideas” are Core Focusing typically revealed concepts themes via – On-going IlluminatingBIG IDEA debates/ Insightful paradox/ perspectives issues problem Organizing Overarching Underlying theory principle assumption (Insightful (Key questions) inferences Q from facts) U 3/7/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 7
  • 8. The big ideas provide a way to connect and recall knowledge Like rules of a game Like Bill of Rights Parallel PostulatesBIG IDEA BIG IDEA A system of many powerful inferences SAS from small set of A2+B2=C2 Congruence givens 3/7/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 8
  • 9. At the heart of teaching for understanding is the creation of consensus-driven curriculum that clearly distinguishes between and among what is just worth being familiar with what students should know, be able to do and understand. The best instructional designs are backward that is they begin with desired results, rather than with instructional activities. UbDs backward design process involves three interrelated stages Understanding by Design Template: the basis of ExchangeBIG IDEA 1. The ubd template embodies the 3 stages of “Backward Design” 2. The template provides an easy mechanism for exchange of ideas 3/7/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 9
  • 10. The “big ideas” of each stage: Standard(s): Unpack the content Understandings Essential Questions standards and ‘content’, s focus on big ideas t a g e What are the big ideas? 1BIG IDEA Assessment Evidence Performance Task(s): Other Evidence: Analyze multiple s t a sources of evidence, g e aligned with Stage 1 2 What‟s the evidence? Learning Activities s t a g Derive the implied e 3 How will we get there? learning from Stages 1 & 2 3/7/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 10
  • 11. STAGE 1 STAGE 2 STAGE 3 U Understanding T Task L Learning Plan Q QuestionsBIG IDEA R Rubrics CS Content Standard OE Other Evidences KKnowledge & Skills 3/7/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 11
  • 12. UNDERSTANDING STAGE 1 Identifying desired resultsSTAGE 1 Click to view the video 3/7/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 13
  • 13. What are the common elements of Stage 1 across quarters? Analyze across quarters the relationship between the elements and the purpose eachUNDERSTANDING of them serves. Share your observations. STAGE 1 How is the Content Standard formulated? Examine the Performance Standard and specify the performance expected of learners. In unpacking the Content Standards, write in meta strips what students are expected to know (knowledge) and do (skills). 3/7/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 14 menu
  • 14. Content standards What learners should know, understand and be able to do?STAGE 1 Essential Understanding Performance standards What learners should create/ add value to/transfer? 3/7/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 Stage15 1
  • 15. STAGE 1: KEY DESIGN ELEMENTS Stage 1 – Desired Results Established Goals: • What relevant goals (e.g., content standards, course or program objectives, learning outcomes) will this design address? Content Standards: Performance Standards: What should students know and be able How well must students do their work? to do? At what level of performance would the student be appropriately qualified or certified?STAGE 1 Essential Understandings (EU): Essential Questions (EQ): Students will understand that . . . • What provocative questions will foster inquiry, • What are the big ideas? understanding, and transfer of learning? • What specific understandings about them Provocative questions are desired? -have no one obvious right answer • What misunderstandings are predictable? -raise other important questions -address the philosophical or conceptual foundations of a discipline -recur naturally -are framed to provoke and sustain learner interest Students will know. . . Students will be able to . . . • What key knowledge and skills will students acquire as a result of this unit? • What should they eventually be able to do as a result of such knowledge and skills? 3/7/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 Stage16 1
  • 16. Established Goals: Students will understand essential concepts about nutrition and diet a.Students will use an understanding of nutrition to plan appropriate diets for themselves b.Students will understand their own individual eating patterns and ways in which those patterns may be improved. Essential Understandings: Essential Questions: What understanding are desired? The student •What is healthful eating?STAGE 1 will understand that ……… •Are you a healthful eater? How would you •A balance diet contributes to physical and mental know? health •How could a healthy diet for one person be •The USDA food pyramid presents relative guidelines unhealthy for an other for nutrition •Why are there so many health problems in •Dietary requirements vary for individuals based on the United States cause by poor nutrition age, activity level, and overall health despite all the available information? •Healthful living requires an individual to act on available information about good nutrition even if it means breaking comfortable habits. Students will know…. Students will be able to •Key terms-protein, fat, calorie, carbohydrates, ….. cholesterol • Read and interpret nutrition information •Types of foods in each food groups and their on food labels nutritional values •Analyze diets for nutritional value •The USDA food pyramid guidelines •Plan balance diets for themselves and •Variables influencing nutritional needs others •General health problems caused by poor nutrition3/7/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 17
  • 17. • Which define what students Established should be able to know and do at the end of the program, Goals course, or unit of study; generally expressed in terms of overall goals, and specifically (Desired defined in terms of content and Result) performance standards.STAGE 1 Established Goals: Students will understand essential concepts about nutrition and diet a.Students will use an understanding of nutrition to plan appropriate diets for themselves b.Students will understand their own individual eating patterns and ways in which those patterns may be improved. 3/7/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 18 Template
  • 18. • Which specify the essential knowledge (includes the most important and enduring Content ideas, issues, principles and concepts from the disciplines), skills and Standard habits of mind that should be taught and learned. They answer the question,STAGE 1 “What should students know and be able to do?”. Students will know…. Students will be able •What key knowledge and skills to ….. will students acquire as a result of this unit? •What should they eventually be able to do as a result of such knowledge and skills? 3/7/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 19 Template
  • 19. • Which express the degree or quality of proficiency that students are expected to demonstrate in relation to theSTAGE 1 content standards. Performance They answer the question, “How Standard well must students do their work?” or “At what level of performance would the student be appropriately qualified or certified?” 3/7/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 20 Template
  • 20. • Which are the big and enduring ideas at the Essential heart of the discipline Understanding and which we want the children to remember even long after they leave school.STAGE 1 Essential understanding/ A Big Idea in a Skill area may be considered in terms of: KEY PURPOSE, STRATEGIES CONTEXT CONCEPTS VALUE • The big ideas • What are skills • What • When to use underlying the accomplishers enhances the skill or skills effectiveness strategy performance 3/7/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 21
  • 21. Finding the Big Ideas in Skills NUTRITION 1. Gives meaning and Topic connection to discrete facts and skills 2. Core ideas in a subjects THEMES CONCEPT • A balance diet • Food Groups 3. Requires •You are what you eat • Overweight uncoveringSTAGE 1 because it is not obvious. Essential Understandings: What understanding are desired? The student will understand that •A balance diet contributes to physical and mental health •The USDA food pyramid presents relative guidelines for nutrition •Dietary requirements vary for individuals based on age, activity level, and overall health •Healthful living requires an individual to act on available information about good nutrition even if it means breaking comfortable habits. 3/7/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 22
  • 22. TIPS for using ESSENTIAL ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS UNDERSTANDING • Frame the desired Involves the Big Ideas that understanding as full- give meaning and sentenced importance to facts generalization in response to the Can transfer to other topic, phrase „ Student willSTAGE 1 fields and adult life. understand that…” •Beware of stating an Is usually not obvious .often understanding as a counterintuitive, are easily truism or vague misunderstood. generality •Avoid the phrase, “ May provide a conceptual Student will foundation for basic skills understand how to….” Statement of conceptual relationships 3/7/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 23 Template
  • 23. • Which are open-ended, provocative questions that Essential spark thinking and further inquiry into the essential Question meanings and understandings.STAGE 1 Essential Questions: What provocative questions will foster inquiry, understanding and transfer of learning? Essential Understandings: Essential Questions: What understanding are desired? The •What is healthful eating? student will understand that ……… •Are you a healthful eater? How would •A balance diet contributes to physical and mental you know? health •How could a healthy diet for one •The USDA food pyramid presents relative person be unhealthy for an other guidelines for nutrition •Why are there so many health •Dietary requirements vary for individuals based problems in the United States cause on age, activity level, and overall health by poor nutrition despite all the •Healthful living requires an individual to act on available information? available information about good nutrition even if it means breaking comfortable habits. 3/7/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 24
  • 24. TIPS for using ESSENTIAL ESSENTIALTemplate QUESTIONS QUESTIONS • Organize programs, courses, units of study and lessons around the questions. “Make the content answer the questions. Have no single Right answer; • Select or design assessment tasks they are meant to be argued. (up front) that are explicitly linked to the questions •Use reasonable number of questions Are designed to provoke and per unit. Make less be moreSTAGE 1 sustain student inquiry, while •Frame the questions in “kid focusing learning and final language” as needed to make them performances. more accessible. •Ensure that every student understands the questions and sees Often address the conceptual or their value. philosophical foundations of •Derive and design specific concrete discipline. exploratory activities and inquiries for each question. •Sequence the questions so that they Raise other important naturally lead from one to another. questions. •Post it in the classroom and encourage to organize notebook around them to make clear their importance for study and note taking Naturally and appropriately •Help student personalize the recur. question 3/7/2011 •Allot sufficient time /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 for unpacking 25
  • 25. MATHEMATICS I General Standard: The learner demonstrates understanding of key concepts and principles of number and number sense as applied to measuring, estimating, graphing, solving equations and inequalities, communicating mathematically and solving problems in real life. QUARTER I (Real Number System, Measurement and Scientific Notation) Stage 1: Results/Outcomes Stage 2: Assessment STANDARDS ESSENTIAL At the Level of Product/ Performance Content Performance Understanding Question Understanding Performance The learner The learner Daily tasks How useful Problems Explanation Assessment of demonstrate formulates involving are real formulated Express numbers problems formulated s real-life measurement, numbers? 1.are real life in different ways based on the following understandi problems conversion, 2.involve real and explain. suggested criteria: numbers, Criteria: real-life problems ng of the involving real estimation and measurement Thorough problems involve real key numbers, scientific notationSTAGE 1 and scientific Coherent numbers, concepts of measurement make use of real notation and measurement and Explain how to real number s and scientific numbers. 3.are solved use the scientific notation systems, notation and using a variety calibration model problems are solved measureme solves these of strategies. and find its using a variety of nts and using a variety degree of strategies scientific of strategies. Physical How are precision Tools: Rubrics for notation. quantities are different Criteria: assessment of Accurate problems formulated measured using measuring Justified and solved different devices measuring useful? Express big and How does small quantities devices. The in scientific precision of the one know notation measurement is when a Criteria: dependent on measureme Accurate the measuring nt is Justified device used. precise? Interpretation accurate? “Tell a Story” of situations where numbers are used or how measuring devices are used. 3/7/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 NEXT26
  • 26. You’ve got to gobelow the surface... 3/7/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 27
  • 27. to uncover thereally ‘big ideas.’ 3/7/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 28
  • 28. UNDERSTANDING STAGE 2 Determine acceptable evidenceSTAGE 2 Click to view the video 3/7/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 29
  • 29. When deciding stage two assessment of student performance, educators must keep in mind the metaphor of a photo album rather than snapshots. Effective monitoring of students progress should incorporate assessment tools and processesAsscptable EvidecnceSTAGE 2 Determining Test and Reflective Academic Culminating Assessment Prompts Assessment Quizzes Constructive journals Performance task Allows for student Response choice and elements • Performance- based items Logs • Format • Audience Independent Listen-think-pair • Topic application share activities • Purpose Interviews Self evaluation Peer response group
  • 30. Information on individual progress Information helps teacher assign grades Teacher with data providesSTAGE 2 picture on how well students are performing in class Assessmen Enables students recognize their t Provides accomplishment Measure students acquisition of higher order thinking skills Help determine if goals are accomplished Measure student engagement & impact on curriculum program 3/7/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 31
  • 31. Session 3: Understanding Stage 2 What is the relationship between the Analyze the following: (a)the relationship between the Performance Standards and Essential Understanding and the Products and Performances across assessment? quarters; what Products and Performances are How Products and Performances for; and may be differentiated.STAGE 2 How would you link the Facets of Understanding to the assessment of Formulate questions using the FUs. the attainment of the Content Standard? Formulate assessment tools for Express orally or in writing your Products and Performances. understanding of Stage 2. Stage 2- Assessment Product or Performance Evidence at the level Evidence at the level of Task: of understanding performance Learner should be able to demonstrate understanding of …… using the six (6) facets of understanding: 3/7/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 32 menu
  • 32. Elements consider in identifying evidences to determine the extent which the desired results have been achieved………… 1. Evidence of understanding knowledge and skills 2. Identify other evidence that will be neededSTAGE 2 3. Use of six facets of understanding 4. Identify appropriate criteria and use them to develop a rubric STAGE 2- ASSESSMENT EVIDENCE Performance Task. Other Evidence •Through what authentic performance tasks will • Through what other evidence students demonstrate the desired understanding? will students demonstrate •By what criteria will performance of understanding achievement of the desired be judge? results? •How will students reflect upon and self-assess their learning 3/7/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 33
  • 33. Teaching for deep understanding emphasized student‟s capacity for meaningful independent use of essential declarative and procedural knowledge using the six facets of learning ExplanationSTAGE 2 Self- Interpretation Knowledge Six Facets of Understanding Empathy Application Perspective 3/7/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 34
  • 34. Facet 1: Explanation Definition  “sophisticated and apt explanations and theories, which provide knowledgeable and justified accounts of events, actions, andSTAGE 2 ideas.” (Wiggins & McTighe,1998) What does this mean?  A student who understands can explain. To explain is to provide thorough, supported, and justifiable evidence and argument. Student who are able to explain can make predictions, ask key questions, provide insights and identify the “big idea”.  SOURCE: McTighe, J. and Wiggins, G. (1998). Understanding by Design. Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development: Virginia. 3/7/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 35
  • 35. Evidence of Explanation Supply and Demand Grades 2-4  ACTIVITIES AND PROCEDURES: 1. Students will be given a box of tokens with at least two different colors in it and asked to select any number of them from 1 to a handful. 2. Place a value on the tokens. (Make certain this is done AFTER students have already selected their tokens.) 3. Pull out an object students would desire to win and let theSTAGE 2 students know that they will only receive an "A" on this lesson if they own this selected item of which you happen to have EXACTLY one of. You will announce the bidding to be open at 10 and they may use their tokens to purchase the item. 4. Continue auction until a student has paid a high price for this item and received it. Then pull out a large supply of the very same item just sold while announcing that you do just happen to have a few more of these items and youre willing to open the bidding at 1. 5. Write supply and demand on board. Ask the individual who bought the overpriced item to define what these terms mean to him in light of the experience he just had, explain why he was motivated to pay such a high price for it, and let us know if he would have paid so much had he known there were enough items to go around. 6. Guide students in a discussion which covers all objectives. (I found an effective lead-in to objective #6 is to ask the following: "What if these tokens represented money and this was all the money you had available for two months?")  TYING IT ALL TOGETHER: 1. Ask students to think of three items in their desks and to secretly set a price for each one of them on an index card which is folded so that it can stand upright on the desks. 2. Instruct students to then take out the items and place them by the appropriate "price tag" on their desks. 3. Invite students to go "shopping" and check out all the prices in the "store". 4. Have students explain examples of supply and demand using their three items. Students are providing a supported explanation of supply and demand.  SOURCE: McTighe, J. and Wiggins, G. (1998). Understanding by Design. Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development: Virginia. 3/7/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 36
  • 36. Facet 2: Interpretation Definition  “interpretations, narratives, and translations that provide meaning.” (Wiggins & McTighe,STAGE 2 1998) What does this mean?  A student who understands can interpret. To interpret is to tell meaningful stories that offer various translations; providing background knowledge to ideas and events; make it personal or accessible through images, anecdotes, analogies, and models.  SOURCE: McTighe, J. and Wiggins, G. (1998). Understanding by Design. Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development: Virginia. 3/7/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 37
  • 37. Evidence of Interpretation HUGS AND KISSES Grades 4-6 Science ProcessesSTAGE 2  Materials: Each group of students (4-5 per group) will receive: Handouts with the nutritional labels from the packages. Recording Chart Nutritional Information  Description of Activity:  Working in-groups of four or five, the students will receive the materials  Compare the nutritional information for each type of candy.  Organize the information from the four nutritional labels into one chart.  Interpret the nutritional value of this. Students will interpret the nutritional value of the Hershey‟s Kiss. http://www.cdf.org/cdf/atissue/vol2_1/hershey/hershey.html  SOURCE: McTighe, J. and Wiggins, G. (1998). Understanding by Design. Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development: Virginia. 3/7/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 38
  • 38. Facet 3: Application Definition  “ability to use knowledge effectively in newSTAGE 2 situations and diverse contexts. (Wiggins & McTighe, 1998) What does this mean?  A student who understands can apply effectively. Students use and adapt what is known in various contexts. Students are able to adjust as they understand.  SOURCE: McTighe, J. and Wiggins, G. (1998). Understanding by Design. Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development: Virginia. 3/7/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 39
  • 39. Evidence of Application Comparing Cultures Grade 2-5  RESOURCES/MATERIALS: For this particular lesson,STAGE 2 the teacher would need Shirley Climos, The Egyptian Cinderella. Various versions of Cinderella from around the world.  ACTIVITIES AND PROCEDURES: Read The Eqyptian Cinderella, to the class. Have cooperative partners work together to list the differences of the book to the Disney Movie Cinderella.  Task: Have the students either orally, or on paper, write their own version of a well-known story, adapting it to another culture. Students are applying knowledge to a new situation.  SOURCE: McTighe, J. and Wiggins, G. (1998). Understanding by Design. Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development: Virginia. 3/7/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 40
  • 40. Facet 4: Perspective Definition  “critical and insightful points of veiw.” (WigginsSTAGE 2 & McTighe,1998) What does this mean?  A student who understands has perspective. Perspective is when a student can see and hear points of view through critical eyes and ears; know the limits and the worth of an idea; can see the big picture.  SOURCE: McTighe, J. and Wiggins, G. (1998). Understanding by Design. Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development: Virginia. 3/7/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 41
  • 41. Evidence of Perspective Good Apples Grades 2-3  MATERIALS: One apple for each student in the class (plus 2-3 extra). The apples should be variousSTAGE 2 sizes, shapes, and colors. With younger children it helps to choose apples with "distinguishing characteristics" such as leaves, scars, and small bruises. You will also need a sharp knife.  ACTIVITIES AND PROCEDURES: Tell the students we will be spending some time finding out about how people are the same and how they are different. Put the apples on a table in front of the class. Have each student in the class choose an apple. Tell them to get to know their apple real well. Suggest they notice their apples special characteristics. Have them make up a story about their apple and tell it to a friend (modeling this step is helpful with younger students). Allow the students to share their stories with the rest of the class. Direct the students to return their apples to the table in front of the class. Mix the apples up and ask the students to come back and find their apple. When they return to their seats ask how they knew which apple was theirs (they will indicate things like color, size, shape, special features). Ask what this has to do with people. Make a list of how people are different. Discuss why this is important. Make a list of how people are the same. Discuss why this is important. The lists may be done in cooperative groups and then shared with the entire class. Students are seeing in perspective as they see and explain the connection between the apples and people.  SOURCE: McTighe, J. and Wiggins, G. (1998). Understanding by Design. Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development: Virginia. 3/7/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 42
  • 42. Facet 5: Empathy Definition  “the ability to get inside another person’sSTAGE 2 feelings and worldview.” (Wiggins & McTighe,1998) What does this mean?  A student needs to empathize to understand. To empathize is to find value in another’s situation or idea; assume that an odd idea may contain worthwhile insights; see incomplete or incorrect elements of ideas; explain misconceptions viewed by others.  SOURCE: McTighe, J. and Wiggins, G. (1998). Understanding by Design. Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development: Virginia. 3/7/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 43
  • 43. Evidence of Empathy Prejudice Martin Luther King and Rosa Parks grades 3-5STAGE 2 http://www.grandtimes.com/rosa.html http://www.stanford.edu/group/King/ Lesson Activities: Step 1 As the children are entering the class, have all the boys sit in the very back of class and the girls sit in the front of the class. After all the girls are seated, give them each a piece of candy and tell them that they get the candy because they are girls and tell the boys that they do not get the candy because they are boys. Step 2 After the candy is passed out to the girls announce to the class that every boy gets an automatic A for the day because they are boys and the girls do not get an automatic A because they are girls. (continue with other scenarios) Step 3 Do a power point presentation on the lives of Martin Luther King Jr. and Rosa Parks telling basic information about where they were born, what they did to make them famous, and how they overcame their prejudice to help people in the future. Step 4 Ask the children how Martin Luther King Jr. and Rosa Parks overcame prejudice. Ask students to imagine they are either Martin Luther King or Rosa Parks. Have them write what Martin Luther King or Rosa Parks thoughts might have been during the times when they were being treated differently because of their race. Students are empathizing with Martin Luther King Jr. or Rosa Parks as they learn about the prejudice they experienced.  SOURCE: McTighe, J. and Wiggins, G. (1998). Understanding by Design. Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development: Virginia. 3/7/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 44
  • 44. Facet 6: Self-Knowledge Definition  “the wisdom to know one’s ignorance and how one’s patterns of thought andSTAGE 2 action inform as well as prejudice understanding.” (Wiggins & McTighe,1998) What does this mean?  Self-Knowledge is the ability to perceive the personal style, prejudices and get beyond them; recognize strengths and weaknesses; question ones own ideas; accept feedback from others.  SOURCE: McTighe, J. and Wiggins, G. (1998). Understanding by Design. Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development: Virginia. 3/7/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 45
  • 45. Evidence of Self-Knowledge Help Save the Rainforest Web Quest Third gradeSTAGE 2  Activities: Students will work cooperatively to complete the web quest. Students should self monitor their work using the rubrics included in the web quest. Each group member is responsible for their specific area as well as contributing to the final group project. Students are demonstrating self-knowledge as they complete the web quest by utilizing the rubrics provided. The creator of the web quest included grading rubrics as well as a self – check rubric.  SOURCE: McTighe, J. and Wiggins, G. (1998). Understanding by Design. Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development: Virginia. 3/7/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111
  • 46. A primary goal of teaching for understanding should be the assurance that students can use their acquired understandings and knowledge independent real word situations and scenarios .G= Goals from the real worldR=Roles that are authentic and final based in realityA= Audiences to whom students will present final products and performanceS = Situations involving a real-world conflict to resolve, decision to bemade, investigation to be completed or invention to be created.P= Products and Performances culminating from the studyS = Standards for evaluating project-based products and performances 3/7/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 48
  • 47. A primary goal of teaching for understanding should be the assurance that students can use their acquired understandings and knowledge independent real word situations and scenarios . 3/7/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 49
  • 48. Stage 3 big idea: E F E F N E C G T and A I G V I E N G
  • 49. Teaching for understanding should innovate activities that support indentifies desired results and integrate planned assessments (Stage 3). O- T- Tailor OrganizeW- H- E- R- E- to for maximuWhere Explore Rethink Exhibit students m Hook the is it students and and and Needs, engagemgoing? Equip Revise Evaluate interest ent and and styles effective ness 3/7/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 51
  • 50. W= how will you help your students to know, Where they are headed,Why they are going there and what ways they will be evaluated alongthe way?H= How will you hook and engage students’s interest andenthusiasmE= What experiences will you provide to help students make theirunderstandings real to equipt learners for success throughout your unit orcourseR= How will you cause students to reflect, revisit, revise andrethink?E= How will students express their understandings andengage in meaningful self-evaluation? T = How will you tailor (differentiate) your instruction to address the unique strength and needs of the learners?O= How will you organize learning experiences so that studentmove from teacher-guided and concrete activities to independent 3/7/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 52
  • 51. 10 Major Design Principles of UbD Understanding by design is not a program to beimplemented; rather it presents a synthesis of research- based practices associated with improving students achievement.. Peer Study Coaching Groups Action Inquiry Research Teams 3/7/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 53
  • 52. STAGE 1- DESIRED RESULTSEstablished Goals:What relevant goals (e.g. content course or program objectives, learning outcomes) will this design address?Essential Understandings: Essential Questions:Students will understand that… What provocative questions will foster• What are the big ideas? inquiry, understanding and transfer of•What specific understandings about them are desired? learning?•What misunderstandings are predictable?Students will know…. Students will be able to …..•What key knowledge and skills will students acquire as a result of thisunit?•What should they eventually be able to do as a result of such knowledgeand skills? STAGE 2- ASSESSMENT EVIDENCEPerformance Task. Other Evidence•Through what authentic performance tasks will students demonstrate • Through what other evidence will studentsthe desired understanding? demonstrate achievement of the desired•By what criteria will performance of understanding be judge? results? •How will students reflect upon and self-assess their learning STAGE 3- LEARNING PLANLearning ActivitiesWhat learning experiences and instruction will enable students to achieve the desired results? How will the designW= Help the students know Where the units is going and What is expected? Help the teacher know Where the students are coming from (prior knowledge, interest)?H = Hook all students and Hold their InterestE= Equip students, help them Experience the key ideas and Explore the issues?R= Provide opportunities to Rethink and Revise their understandings and work?E= Allow students to Evaluate their work and its implicationsT = Be Tailored (personalized) to the different needs, interestO= Be Organized to maximize initial and sustained engagement as well as effective learning 3/7/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 54
  • 53. Students Learn actively not passive. Educators should consider big ideas when designing and delivering10 MAJOR DESIGN PRINCIPLES instruction At the heart of teaching for understanding is the creation of consensus-driven curriculum that clearly distinguishes between and among what is just worth being familiar with what students should know, be able to do and understand. OF UBD The best instructional designs are backward that is they begin with desired results, rather than with instructional activities. UbDs backward design process involves three interrelated stages Students develop conceptual understanding when they can cue into the enduring understandings and essential questions at the heart of the curriculum Enduring understanding are statements that clearly articulate big ideas that have lasting value. Essential questions are big, open-ended interpretive questions that have no obvious answer 3/7/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 55
  • 54. 10 MAJOR DESIGN PRINCIPLES OF UBD 3/7/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 56
  • 55. UbDs STRENGTH The common sense nature of UbDs principles and strategies Power to overcome tendency to teach to the test and emphasize knowledge-recall learning Ability to provide common-consensus driven language Potential for guiding and informing the process of school renewal and educational reform Ability to guide and inform educator‟s effort to unpack standards 3/7/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 57
  • 56. UbDs PROBLEMS & CHALLENGES PROBLEMS The need for Educator’s educators to misconception The need toreflect on UbD Moving UbD A need to collect, about UbD implementation make framework . analyze and UbD a disseminate long term achievement initiative. data. Ambivalence to framework Confusion Resistance 3/7/2011 /Mtppelones/UBD/030111 58