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American Chemcial Society Presentation - September 11, 2013
American Chemcial Society Presentation - September 11, 2013
American Chemcial Society Presentation - September 11, 2013
American Chemcial Society Presentation - September 11, 2013
American Chemcial Society Presentation - September 11, 2013
American Chemcial Society Presentation - September 11, 2013
American Chemcial Society Presentation - September 11, 2013
American Chemcial Society Presentation - September 11, 2013
American Chemcial Society Presentation - September 11, 2013
American Chemcial Society Presentation - September 11, 2013
American Chemcial Society Presentation - September 11, 2013
American Chemcial Society Presentation - September 11, 2013
American Chemcial Society Presentation - September 11, 2013
American Chemcial Society Presentation - September 11, 2013
American Chemcial Society Presentation - September 11, 2013
American Chemcial Society Presentation - September 11, 2013
American Chemcial Society Presentation - September 11, 2013
American Chemcial Society Presentation - September 11, 2013
American Chemcial Society Presentation - September 11, 2013
American Chemcial Society Presentation - September 11, 2013
American Chemcial Society Presentation - September 11, 2013
American Chemcial Society Presentation - September 11, 2013
American Chemcial Society Presentation - September 11, 2013
American Chemcial Society Presentation - September 11, 2013
American Chemcial Society Presentation - September 11, 2013
American Chemcial Society Presentation - September 11, 2013
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American Chemcial Society Presentation - September 11, 2013

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  • 1. Integrated Energy Parks as a Model for Rural Economic Development and Energy Diversification in the Appalachian Coalfields Roger Ford, CEO Patriot Bioenergy Corporation
  • 2. The Problem • Rural communities have been negatively impacted by declining coal production; Lowest coal industry employment level since 1950 • Failure to properly prepare for declining mining industrial activity by local leaders, relying on the next ‘coal boom’ • Lack of governmental policy development that focuses on rural regions to spur investment, R&D, and commercialization of biomass technologies • Dependence on monolithic economy has led to outmigration, brain-drain, and a collapsing economy • 89% of post-mining land is NOT developed (NRDC)
  • 3. The Potential: Integrated Development • Our model is based on idea that integrates various, available resources within Central Appalachia • Our upcoming report on potential for industrial hemp production on post-mining land will examine potential to off-set coal-related job losses, economic stagnation in rural economies, and industrial hemp compares as a feedstock for bio-chemical and bio-energy production.
  • 4. Identified Sites • We have identified nearly 75 preliminary sites in West Virginia and Kentucky that represent a separate site for an Integrated Energy Park™ • The sites would provide sufficient acreage for biomass production, solar arrays, and modular systems to process biomass for power generation, alternative fuel production, and other industrial/agriculture processes
  • 5. Integrated Energy Parks™ • Integrated Energy Parks™ provide a closed-loop model that targets energy production to aid in the complimentary operations which use industrial hemp (or similar feedstock) for value-added products. Hemp is the preferred biomass feedstock based on renewable solar energy, and fossil fuels. • The model allows for continual duplication • Both NATO and DoD have examined Smart-Grid/Micro-Grid deployment for base security • Civilian application works similar objectives that provides for 1) distributive generation and 2) stable energy supply for other manufacturing activities
  • 6. The Integrated Model Fossil Fuels
  • 7. Biomass on Post-mining Land Sweet Sorghum on Post-mining Land 2011-2012
  • 8. Hybrid Energy Beets
  • 9. Viability of Hybrid Energy Beets • The US Congress, under the Energy Independence and Security Act, has established a mandate for 36 Billion GPY from Alternative Energy Sources by 2022. – Corn EtOH Expected Peak Is 15 Billion GPY in 2015 – Beets do not require tax credits or incentives to be economically feasible. – BCAP (Biomass Crop Assistance Program) eligible. • EPA recognizes sugar beet as an “ADVANCED BIO-FUEL after recognizing -- based on scientific studies -that it reduces the emission of greenhouse gases by over 60% (corn ~-30% - RFA) when compared to gasoline. • Corn/Grain is not a good EtOH crop for many of the southern regions. • Coastal regions – high population areas – of the US and CAN have very few corn ethanol plants. • Gen 2.0 - Beets (like sugar cane) qualify as 2nd generation biofuels including cellulosic ethanol. • Ethanol from cellulosic materials like switch grass and wood products cost 3x more than ethanol from sugar products. This is an increase in production/operations costs, making them presently cost prohibitive.
  • 10. Why Energy Beets? • Advanced and Cellulosic Biofuel classification – Beets are not food product until fully processed. • Plant breeding programs already include genetic engineering • Provide greater environmental values in the production of alternative fuels. (Nitrogen scavenger, reduces salts & excess H20, others) • ~Double the yield of ethanol / acre compared to corn grain. (26-30 gal/ton and 800-1500 gal/a) • Unlike Corn and sorghum, energy beets produce higher sugar content with minimal nitrogen, a key contributor to GHG • Shortened fermenting process timeline • High value bi-products – livestock feed with similar total feed value as corn.
  • 11. Why Energy Beets? (Continued) • No need for Pilot or Demonstration plants – we’ve been processing beets for sugar for 100 years and, making Alcohol from sugar for 100 years • Focus on Farmer/Rural economy - creates new high value crop option for local farmers and communities. • Offers opportunity for double cropping – beets can be a fall planted winter crop. • Beets can be stored, in addition to flexible harvest options. • Sustainable crop with tremendous flexibility to growing environment • Increase rural prosperity with the addition of another added value crop – JOBS! • “Sugar is the new Crude”
  • 12. Available Marginal Farmland Produce 11.9 MTY to 14.6 MTY of Production per Year Cropland Harvested Pastured Other Woodland Rangeland CRP Total West 2,899,629 734,671 493,870 1,101,705 471,144 348,264 6,049,284 Central 1,848,973 1,600,940 281,417 1,357,147 967,817 49,987 6,106,281 East 230,380 241,339 76,741 652,758 174,718 5,471 1,381,410 Total 4,978,983 2,576,950 852,031 3,111,610 1,613,678 403,724 13,536,975 Source: http://www.nass.usda.gov/Census/Create_Census_US.jsp
  • 13. The Hemp Solution • Industrial Hemp/Cellulosic Feedstock – Cheaper to produce because inputs are reduced • No pesticides • Better yield per acre: cash value provides 5:1 in comparison to tobacco • Durable: Little Water, Able to Grow on Very Marginal Land – Process Hemp: • Bio-Plastics • Bio-Fuels: Cellulosic Ethanol/Bio-Diesel • Bio-Chemical Streams – Sugar Streams & Conversion for Bio-Pharmaceuticals – Carbon Sequestration/Soil Conditioning – Blending with coal to reduce emissions
  • 14. Canadian Model • All commercial industrial hemp crops are planted using only certified seed from varieties listed in Health Canada's list of approved cultivars. • Seed saving and the use of common seed are currently not allowed under the regulation. • Canadian plant breeding programs have developed a number of high yielding cultivars that are suitable to a wide range of growing conditions. • The most common varieties that are presently being contracted and grown in Canada are Alyssa, Anka, CRS1, CFX-1, CFX-2, Delores and Finola.
  • 15. Positive First Steps in Canada • As with many new crops, there has been considerable fluctuation in hemp production area. • In 1998, about 241 licenses were issued. • In 1999, the number of applications to grow hemp jumped dramatically to 545 with the area of hemp production increasing six-fold to nearly 35,086 acres (14,205 hectares). Much of this production was driven by the promise of the development of large scale industrial fiber plants in Manitoba.
  • 16. Yields Per Acre Hemp • The highest seed yield recorded to date in Canada has topped 2,000 lbs per acre; an average yield is between 600 to 800 lbs per acre. (Canadian Hemp Trade Alliance). • An acre will also produce an average of 5,300 lbs of straw, which can be transformed into about 1,300 lbs of fiber. • Hemp grain yields range from 100 to 1,200 lbs per acre while yield for crops grown and managed solely as fiber crops, range from 1 to 6 tons per acre (Manitoba Agriculture, Food and Rural Initiatives online report).
  • 17. Coal-Hemp Blending • Our report focuses on the effects of blending industrial hemp material with lower quality coal in a ratio to reduce emissions while maintain Btu for direct combustion “The opportunities for biomass co-firing are great because large scale coal-powered boilers represent 310 GW of generating capacity. Co-firing biomass with coal offers several environmental benefits.” NREL Fact Sheet on Biomass Co-Firing
  • 18. Coal Sample* Moisture 11.76 As Recd 11.76 Ash 9.22 4.18 9.22 Volatile 38.66 53.47 38.66 Sulfur 3.45 1.56 3.45 FSI 3 BTU 13,210 MAF 14,522 3.00 9,951 13,210 14,522 *Representative Sample from the Illinois Coal Basin
  • 19. Hemp Sample
  • 20. 50/50 Blending HEMP Illinois Basin 1 2 % 50.00% 50.00% NET Tons 1,000 1,000 Moisture As Recd 13.25 As Recd 11.76 Ash 0.29 0.33 8.14 9.22 Volatile 75.11 83.58 34.11 38.66 Sulphur 0.09 0.10 3.04 3.45 FSI 0 3 BTU 8,270 9,538 11,657 13,210 MAF 9,565 14,522 GAR 100.00% 2,000 As Recd 12.51 4.18 4.78 53.47 61.12 1.56 1.78 1.50 9,951 11,374 12,044
  • 21. 75/25 Blending HEMP % NET Tons Moisture As Recd Ash 0.29 Volatile 75.11 Sulphur 0.09 FSI BTU 8,270 MAF Illinois Basin 1 2 GAR 50.00% 50.00% 100.00% 1,500 500 2,000 13.25As Recd 11.76As Recd 12.88 0.33 8.14 9.22 4.18 2.55 83.58 34.11 38.66 53.47 72.35 0.10 3.04 3.45 1.56 0.94 0 3 0.75 9,538 11,657 13,210 9,951 10,456 9,565 14,522 10,804
  • 22. Virginia Hybrid Energy Center • The Virginia City Hybrid Energy Center generates 585 MW from co-firing lower quality coal and biomass. • The low costs, versatility, high per-acre yield and potential to be grown on post-mining land makes industrial hemp an attractive option for blending with Appalachian coal at the source.
  • 23. Renewable Solar Helps Coal • Virtual rooftop aggregation of solar on undeveloped land – Economies of scale – Cost per watt falling at an exponential rate • Company IP regarding the algorithms coupling generation from natural gas and solar make us an first-adopter • Enable transition as mining is completed • Defined post-mining land use will enable fasttrack release of bond permits funds
  • 24. Emergent Utility-Scale Solar • From 2010 to 2011 the average size of a distributed PV installation, i.e. residential and commercial-scale PV systems, grew by 46 percent to 18 kW, and the average size of a utility-scale PV installation increased by 250 percent to 4.62 MW • The rise of utility-scale solar projects — defined here as systems 1 MW+ in capacity — began with an increase from almost 0 percent to 15 percent of all grid installed PV capacity in 2009, then to 32 percent in 2010, and then to 38 percent in 2011 http://www.renewableenergyworld.com/rea/blog/post/2013/08/uti lity-scale-solar-and-the-probable-rise-of-virtual-rooftop-solar
  • 25. Report & Project Goals • Identify best path forward for deployment • Power generation through integration of fossil fuels, solar, and biomass • Produce transportation fuel, bio-chemical feedstock or bio-plastics through modular facilities from feedstock within 60-70 mile radius of facilities • Monetize byproducts to increase profitability • Monetize Carbon Credits and Provide Sequestration Opportunities
  • 26. Contact Info 237 2nd Street, Suite 5 Pikeville, Kentucky 41501 www.patriotbioenergy.com

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