OER Africa – An Introduction (Kenya Methodist University, Meru) January 2010
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

OER Africa – An Introduction (Kenya Methodist University, Meru) January 2010

on

  • 557 views

Presentation on an Institutional Policy Review by OER Africa to the Kenya Methodist University, Meru, Kenya, 27th January 2010.

Presentation on an Institutional Policy Review by OER Africa to the Kenya Methodist University, Meru, Kenya, 27th January 2010.

Statistics

Views

Total Views
557
Views on SlideShare
557
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment
  • 27/01/2010 OER Africa KeMU Policy Review
  • 27/01/2010 OER Africa KeMU Policy Review
  • 27/01/2010 OER Africa KeMU Policy Review
  • 27/01/2010 OER Africa KeMU Policy Review
  • The starting point for the review was the KeMU vision, mission and objectives,. KeMU’s Vision, Mission and objectives commit the institution to providing high quality education opportunities in order to develop the kind of graduates who will work with and add value to the communities they serve. Given the emphasis placed on high quality research and teaching and the notions of community engagement and good neighbourliness, it appears that a sound value basis exists for the developing and sharing of OER among and with like-minded institutions – by like minded, we mean those that also see higher education as a social good that should contribute to positive social transformation. 27/01/2010 OER Africa KeMU Policy Review
  • The Foundation Documents governing the role of trustees and the use of University facilities, as well as sections 4 (1) and 6 (1) of the Charter, provide an overarching policy framework that would seem to support the possibility of KeMU collaborating with other institutions in the development and sharing of OER. e.g. The document ‘A Guide to KeMU values’ December 2006 includes the following professional values of staff that can also be considered as supportive of collaborative OER development and sharing: teamwork, stewardship (making the best use of limited resources), intellectual honesty and creativity as also does the specification of values related to ‘other friends of the University’. 27/01/2010 OER Africa KeMU Policy Review
  • If we look at the context within which the university operates, a rationale for collaborative development and sharing of educational resources becomes even clearer: KeMU’s Strategic Plan suggests that in a rapidly changing world, it behoves the university to contemplate both its relevance and its contribution to the training of graduates who will positively contribute not only to Kenya’s future, and that of the region, but also, to that of the world in what is increasingly a global knowledge economy. Yet all of this contribution and service must occur in ways that take cognisance of decreasing external funding and increasing demand (Strategic Planning, 2006: 8). Again, as noted in your Strategic Plan, greater flexibility in modes of teaching (ibid 18), more efficient utilisation and development of a core staff (ibid 22), strengthening of capacity in and use of ICTs (ibid 20, 21, 27) and greater collaboration (ibid 30) will become increasingly important. Each of these aspects are supported by and conducive to collaborative OER development and sharing. Having ascertained that the university’s Vision, Mission, Values and Strategic Planning are all supportive of a collaborative OER development and sharing, without actually needing to mention OER specifically, the review turned its attention to the supporting policy framework. 27/01/2010 OER Africa KeMU Policy Review
  • Greater flexibility in modes of teaching; more efficient utilisation and development of a core staff; strengthening of capacity in and use of ICTs; and greater collaboration are each aspects that are supported by KeMU’s Foundation documents and conducive to making the most of limited resources in pursuance of the institution's key objectives. Having ascertained that the university’s Vision, Mission, Values and Strategic Planning are all supportive of a collaborative OER development and sharing – without actually needing to mention OER specifically – the review then turned its attention to the supporting policy framework. 27/01/2010 OER Africa KeMU Policy Review
  • The Human Resources Policy Manual was of particular interest in ascertaining the level to which KeMU may or may not have in place policies that would support faculty and staff in pursuing collaborative materials development and or the creation or modification of open educational resources. Whilst greater detail is available in the report circulated earlier, we felt is might be important to highlight a few points in this presentation If KeMU moves towards resource-based learning in a more general way, it may need to give thought to establishing new departments / roles to support faculty in terms of both pedagogy and the use/ potential of educational technology. Most Faculty will have been employed as discipline specialists rather than as learning resource developers. 27/01/2010 OER Africa KeMU Policy Review
  • Whilst this cluster of policies appears neutral towards collaboration and OER, the key issue will be whether or not learning resource development is factored into the formal job descriptions of the staff who enjoy the benefits described and must accordingly meet the requirements set out in the policies. We would suggest that the teaching role includes the development of appropriate learning resources and that job descriptions are accordingly amended to reflect this. However, a caveat here is that a team approach will be required to bring together content, pedagogic and technical expertise in the design and development process and this should also therefore be captured in a policy statement. 27/01/2010 OER Africa KeMU Policy Review
  • This cluster of policies is critical for the support of collaboration and OER. The basic provisions here will stand but they need to be supplemented by statements about: 27/01/2010 OER Africa KeMU Policy Review
  • This policy has no particular collaboration/ OER implication other than that it extends to relationships with all collaboration partners outside of the institution . However, it does serve to remind staff of the need for gender sensitivity in the learning resources that will be shared as OER. So case studies should avoid gender stereo-typing and language should be gender specific only when it is contextually relevant otherwise gender neutral nouns and pronouns are preferred e.g. student, staff, people, person. 27/01/2010 OER Africa KeMU Policy Review
  • This policy has no particular collaboration/ OER implication However, consideration might be given to extending the notion of a sabbatical to include research for and the development of learning resources 27/01/2010 OER Africa KeMU Policy Review
  • The broad provisions set out here are applicable also for the collaborative use and development of OER. However, strategic decisions will need to be made about how to get the maximum impact from the specific kinds of training associated with the development of learning resources that will become OER. This would typically include training related to: curriculum and course design; instructional/ pedagogic design; assessment design; copyright, copyright clearance and creative commons; quality assurance as well as the use of specific technological hardware and software. For example, all academic staff need to be conversant with contemporary theories of learning but not all staff need to be able to use camcorders or specific audio- or video- editing software which is better located within a service bureau. 27/01/2010 OER Africa KeMU Policy Review
  • This policy is general in nature and does not necessarily have particular implications for OER development. It establishes that the staff are the most important resources in the institution and that their welfare is a shared individual and institutional responsibility. At issue is whether or not the development of learning resources is seen as part of staff core job descriptions and is provided for accordingly. Development of high quality learning resources is a time-consuming process and generally works best when a team of people are involved and bring different competences to bear – for example good academics with high research outputs are not necessarily good developers of learning materials. An hour of well-structured print-based learning material may well take 10 to 20 hours of writing time through several drafts; an hour of well-structured e-learning material may well take ten times as long. (Neil talk more on why this is?) 27/01/2010 OER Africa KeMU Policy Review
  • These documents are concerned the definition of functional roles. We do not see these roles being strongly influenced by involvement in OER but there will need to be a process to identify areas in which learning resources need to be developed, for selecting which of these to share as OER and how, and finally to sign off – giving final authorisation on the part of KeMU for the release of the OER. 27/01/2010 OER Africa KeMU Policy Review
  • The basic provisions of the policy are fairly standard. As noted in comments on the policies of business ethics and public relations, there will need to be some guidelines on what can shared, when and with whom and the signing off processes thereof for draft and final OER. 27/01/2010 OER Africa KeMU Policy Review
  • Section 3.2 (e) outlines the ways in which access to and dissemination of information can be supported through online systems such as OPAC and PERI. Could posibbly extend list of accessible resources to include OER repositories and referatories. Section 3.4 which deals with ‘Resource Sharing’ might also usefully be extended to include OER. Thought will need to be given to how KeMU will archive its own OER internally and make it available externally, how it will manage versioning of OER and how it will facilitate access to OER produced externally and the Library should probably play a leading role in these processes. 27/01/2010 OER Africa KeMU Policy Review
  • This policy document is unlikely to be affected by collaboration and OER development. In Section 6 which deals with Academic Discipline, it may be useful o foreground the ease of access to information in the information age and hence the risk of plagiarism (which may not be intentional) for both staff and students in the preparation of learning resources, research papers and assignments. Currently Section 8.4 (c) links issues of plagiarism to student offences. Section 6 might usefully provide some guidelines on copyright, Creative Commons and referencing or refer staff and students to a policy guide that specifically addresses these issues. 27/01/2010 OER Africa KeMU Policy Review
  • This policy document is unlikely to be affected by collaboration and OER development. May be useful to foreground in Section 3.2 and Appendix 3 that one of the criteria for appointment and promotion could be the successful development of high quality peer-reviewed learning resources. It is noted that development of learning resources can attract additional compensation for part-time staff working on ODL courses and, by implication, development of learning resources for Academic Enterprise initiatives. It might be useful to articulate quite clearly the assumptions that underpin estimates of time needed to develop learning resources of different kinds and how this leads to the compensation offered. In addition, if the institution sees itself moving more towards distance and learning resource based teaching, the implications of this for full time academic staff loads need to be unpacked. Consideration might also be given to the need for an additional kind of support person – one who combines both IT/technical expertise with pedagogic expertise to assist discipline experts across the university with learning resource development. Discipline experts are not necessarily accomplished materials developers. 27/01/2010 OER Africa KeMU Policy Review
  • Unlikely to have a direct impact on OER activities. As with the Academic Handbook, the Student Code of Conduct might usefully provide some guidance regarding plagiarism or copyright or refer students to the KeMU policy thereon. It is noted that Part 3, App 1 lists various kinds of work which students might undertake for the university and this list might usefully be extended to include support for OER development e.g. sourcing, developing of graphics, copyright clearing etc. It is also noted that the KeMUSO constitution in section 9.1 (K) makes provision for an ODL Representative among whose duties is to help the institution to “ensure materials are issued on time” and “are relevant to the course requirements”. This sets a useful framework for student engagement in the development and review of learning resources more generally. 27/01/2010 OER Africa KeMU Policy Review
  • In this current iteration, this policy is primarily concerned with the management of student personal information and academic records. A similar set of guidelines will be needed for the management and archiving of the institution’s OER. Systems need to be established to ensure that learning resources are quality assured and copyright cleared prior to release as OER and that the correct version of the resource is released. Similar issues about access to drafts and back ups need to be addressed. 27/01/2010 OER Africa KeMU Policy Review
  • This policy document will not have any direct impact on OER activities. However, section 8 (g) which deals with IPR issues might usefully be expanded with reference to a more general policy on plagiarism, copyright and Creative Commons issues. In addition, KeMU needs to decide whether or not to make completed post Graduate research reports, dissertations and theses available to the wider community of practice as OER. In order to do this it would need to assert institutional copyright (perhaps non-exclusive so that graduate students can continue to mine their own graduate studies). 27/01/2010 OER Africa KeMU Policy Review
  • Since ODL methods are already being employed at KeMU through the Open and Distance Learning Mode Department, it seems useful to conclude with a reflection on the policy linkages between OER and ODL provision. The framework used for this analysis has been adapted from Lentell (2004: 249-259) and Welch & Reed (Eds) (c.2005). Linkages with the ODLM Policy and Operational Guidelines document of February 2008 (ODLM 2008) are noted. KeMU Policy Review 27/01/2010 OER Africa
  • With regard to ODL systems… KeMU Policy Review 27/01/2010 OER Africa
  • This is covered in Sect A 2, 3; and Section B, 2.5 of the ODLM Policies & Guidelines KeMU Policy Review 27/01/2010 OER Africa
  • ODLM materials development is primarily outsourced but training is provided for writers and e-tutors, (See ODLM 2008 Sect A, 2.3.4, 4.4.3.1) KeMU Policy Review 27/01/2010 OER Africa
  • ODLM materials development is primarily outsourced but training is provided for writers and e-tutors, (See ODLM 2008 Sect A, 2.3.4, 4.4.3.1) KeMU Policy Review 27/01/2010 OER Africa
  • KeMU Policy Review 27/01/2010 OER Africa
  • KeMU already has a strategic intent and an implementation strategy that supports collaboration and the systematic deployment of OER and it has a vested interest in finding more efficient and effective ways to create and maintain learning resources because of its existing commitment to ODL provision in some sectors. However, there are gaps in the current policy framework – particularly regarding an effective policy locating materials development in a much larger curriculum design process in the short term and the implications of possibly extending the existing ODL provision in the medium to long term – that should be addressed if the institution is keen to exploit the potential of collaborative efforts in materials development and the potential of OER. Without modification of the policy environment to address these gaps, it will be difficult to harness this potential in a systematic and sustainable way. KeMU Policy Review 27/01/2010 OER Africa
  • The above analysis clearly illustrates that KeMU’s existing policy framework is largely supportive of increased collaboration, sharing of course materials, and harnessing of OER. However, it is also clear that current policy was developed prior to considerations of the possibility of working with OER. Accordingly, this section includes key issues for consideration emerging from the above review. It may be that some of the issues are covered by policies that have not yet been made available to the review team. A key policy statement that seems to be lacking in the documents reviewed so far is with regard to the Intellectual Property Rights and Copyright of staff, students and the institution with regard to learning resources developed in the normal course of learning and teaching and how these might be shared. Policy must make clear and unequivocal statements on the IPR and Copyright relating to learning resources developed by staff and students in the course of their work as currently the ODLM guidelines refer specifically to development that has been outsourced. KeMU Policy Review 27/01/2010 OER Africa
  • KeMU Policy Review 27/01/2010 OER Africa
  • KeMU Policy Review 27/01/2010 OER Africa
  • 27/01/2010 OER Africa KeMU Policy Review

OER Africa – An Introduction (Kenya Methodist University, Meru) January 2010 OER Africa – An Introduction (Kenya Methodist University, Meru) January 2010 Presentation Transcript

  • OER AfricaAn Institutional Policy Review for theKenya Methodist University KeMU Institutional Policy Workshop Main Campus, Mderu 27th January, 2010
  • Objective to identify the extent to which the existing policy framework supports the development and use of OER in taking forward the institution’s goals; to suggest areas which might need to be reviewed or added to optimise policy support in guiding practice.22/03/12 KeMU Policy and OER Workshop 2
  • Documentation reviewed (1)• Foundation Documents: Trust Deed, Charter, Statutes and, KeMU Values, 1991• Strategic Plan 2006 – 2015, August 2006• Open and Distance Learning Mode (ODLM) Department. Policy and Operational Guidelines, February 4th, 2008• Human Resources Policy Manual, April 2007• Academic Handbook. Guidelines, Policies and Procedures. Revised Edition, June 2009• Administrative Handbook for Lecturer. First Edition, December 6th, 2006• Proposed Draft Common Regulations and Procedures for Postgraduate Studies, December 2008• [The Role of] Dean of Faculty/ School/ Institute, September 200822/03/12 KeMU Policy and OER Workshop 3
  • Documentation reviewed (2)• Academic Enterprise (Income-Generating) Programmes. Policy and Operational Guidelines. Revised November 21, 2006• Department of Students’ Welfare and Development, Instruments of Governance. Students’ Code of Conduct and Discipline. [3rd Edition], March 2009• A Guide to Policies, Rules and Regulations of the Library Services, July 2006• The Kenya Methodist University Alumni Association Constitution {KEMUAA}, 10/26/2007• Chaplaincy Policy, September 2008• Draft Records Management Policy, April 2009• Website – www.kemu.ac.ke – visited 10 December 2009.22/03/12 KeMU Policy and OER Workshop 4
  • Overall Policy Framework (1)Philosophy … to foster the intellectual, spiritual and physical development of the wholesome individual in order to recognize and utilize the available opportunities for enhancement of human development with the appropriate recognition and respect for other creations.Vision "To be a leading world class University in East Africa, committed to raising a new generation of transformational leaders, who are well grounded and committed to spiritual and ethical values".Mission "To contribute to the transformation of our society by providing high quality education that promotes excellence in scholarship, research and selfless service to the community".22/03/12 KeMU Policy and OER Workshop 5
  • Overall Policy Framework (2)Objectives to provide quality training through provision of scholarship, advancement of knowledge through research and development of specialized activities in the University; to produce effective graduates with the appropriate practical and specialized skills, attitudes and values required for personal growth and advancement of responsible citizens in the global environment; to participate in community service through provision of continuing education, conduction of research, participation in external services, provision of specialist consultative or referral services, facilitation of community empowerment, empowerment promotion of fairness and natural justice and maintenance of good neighbourliness with the community. Source:(website, 10/12/09; KeMU Charter, 5 (2), (3), (4))22/03/12 KeMU Policy and OER Workshop 6
  • Policy ContextKeMU Charter, 2006 – Part 4. OBJECTIVES 4(1) The University may, subject to approval by the Commission, enter into affiliations or academic linkages with any individual, group or institution as provided for in the Statutes 22/03/12 KeMU Policy and OER Workshop 7
  • Is Overall Policy and StrategyConducive to Collaborative OER ?KeMU Charter, 2006 – Part 6. FUNCTIONS 6(1) (b) participate in discovery, collection, processing and dissemination of knowledge for the betterment of humankind and to provide opportunity for development of intellectual activities, academic freedom and scholarly acumen 6(1)(c) determine what may be taught, how it may be taught and who may teach at the University 6(1) (f) establish linkages, affiliations or collaborative ventures with individuals, groups or institutions, private or public, in support of research, teaching or service activities of the University  6(1) (g) foster development of good neighbourliness and promote intellectual and social interaction between the University, other institutions and members of the public.22/03/12 KeMU Policy and OER Workshop 8
  • Human Resources Policy (April 2007)Policy Position / Objective Relevance to Collaboration / OERPolicy on hiring of salariedor monthly employees  Policy will probably not affect / be affected by an agenda of•This policy governs both internal collaboration and / or OER;transfers as well as externalappointments if the necessary  If KeMU is part of the trendcompetences are not available towards resource-basedinternally or nobody applies learning, consideration mightinternally. be given to providing staff with support in terms of pedagogy and / or use of educational technology. 22/03/12 KeMU Policy and OER Workshop 9
  • Human Resources Policy (2)Policy Position / Objective Relevance to Collaboration / OERPolicies on annual salary  teaching role could include theand merit review, development of appropriatepromotions and learning resources – JDsperformance management. accordingly amended  team approach will be required to bring together content, pedagogic and technical expertise in the design and development process and this should also therefore be captured in a policy statement. 22/03/12 KeMU Policy and OER Workshop 10
  • Human Resources Policy (3)Policy Position / Objective Relevance to Collaboration / OERPolicy statements on  Critical – basic provisions willbusiness ethics, Policy on stand and could be supportedPublic Relations by statements on:•emphasises the institution’s • copyright and copyright clearancestrong commitment to the highest of source resources, draft resourcesstandards of ethical and legal and final OERconduct in all its businesspractices. • the ‘ownership’ of and rights•requires honesty and integrity regarding resources created byfrom every employee in their KeMU staff and/or studentsdealings with fellow employees, (including research outputs) and/orthe institution, the business commissioned persons/ bodiescommunity and the general public. • branding of KeMU resources shared • signing off processes for finalisation of OER to be shared. 22/03/12 KeMU Policy and OER Workshop 11
  • Human Resources Policy (4)Policy Position / Objective Relevance to Collaboration / OERPolicy against sexual  No particular collaboration /harassment OER implication  Reminder of need for gender sensitivity in learning resources developed  Reminder to avoid gender stereo-typing  Reminded that language need only be gender specific if contextually relevant . 22/03/12 KeMU Policy and OER Workshop 12
  • Human Resources Policy (5)Policy Position / Objective Relevance to Collaboration / OERPolicy guidelines on  Appear neutral toallowances, leave, collaboration / OERretirement and discipline.  Possibly consider notion of a sabbatical for research and development of learning resources. 22/03/12 KeMU Policy and OER Workshop 13
  • Human Resources Policy (6)Policy Position / Objective Relevance to Collaboration / OERPolicies and procedures for  Broadly applicable to thestaff training and collaborative use anddevelopment. development of OER.(September 2008)  Strategic decisions will need to be made about how to get the maximum impact from the specific kinds of training associated with the development of learning resources that will become OER. 22/03/12 KeMU Policy and OER Workshop 14
  • Human Resources Policy (7)Policy Position / Objective Relevance to Collaboration / OERStaff Welfare Policy  General policy – no particular(September 2008) implications to the collaborative use and development of OER.  Issue is whether or not development of learning resources perceived to be part of staff core job descriptions and provided for accordingly. 22/03/12 KeMU Policy and OER Workshop 15
  • Human Resources Policy (8)Policy Position / Objective Relevance to Collaboration / OERRoles of Deans of Faculty/  No apparent implications toSchool/ Institute; Role of collaboration / OER.Academic Coordinator in  Need to consider process bythe KeMU Centres which / authority through(both September 2008) whom to do the following;Role of Chairman of  identify areas in whichDepartment; Functions of learning resources need to bethe Dean’s Committee, developed; selection process(both August 2008). for which to share as OER and how; and finally to sign off – giving final authorisation on the part of KeMU for the release of the OER. 22/03/12 KeMU Policy and OER Workshop 16
  • ICTs & ICT InfrastructurePolicy Position / Objective Relevance to Collaboration / OERPolicy on Electronic Mail  Standard ICT Policy•all email is considered business  Guidelines may be requiredmail and therefore the institutionhas full access and rights regarding what can be sharedregarding all email; and with whom, in regard to OER.•prohibits the emailing ofconfidential and copyrightedinformation 22/03/12 KeMU Policy and OER Workshop 17
  • Policies in Support of Teaching &Learning - Library ServicesPolicy Position / Objective Relevance to Collaboration / OERA guide to rules, policies  List of resources could includeand regulations of the OER repositories.library services, July 2006  ‘Resource Sharing’ section•This Guide to policy and could extend to OER.procedure regarding the libraryservices offered by the institution  Consider how to archive ownand how these may be accessed. OER internally and make it available externally; how to manage versioning; and how will facilitate access to OER  Library should play a leading role in these processes. 22/03/12 KeMU Policy and OER Workshop 18
  • Policies in Support of Teaching &Learning - Academic HandbookPolicy Position / Objective Relevance to Collaboration / OERAcademic Handbook:  Section 6 (AcademicGuidelines, Policies and Discipline) could highlightProcedures (June 2009) ease of access to information•Stipulates academic procedures, in information age andguidelines and policies to be attendant risk of plagiarismfollowed in order to assist faculty (which may not be intentional)and students to observe and uphold  Section 6 could hence providehigh scholarship, achieve high some guidelines on copyright,academic standards while Creative Commons andmaintaining efficiency and referencing / refer staff andunderstanding of the University students to a policy thatAcademic organs and their functions. addresses these issues.p. (i) 22/03/12  KeMU Policy and OER Workshop 19
  • Admin Handbook for Lecturers &Guidance on Academic EnterprisePolicy Position / Objective Relevance to Collaboration / OERAdministrative Handbook forLecturers (December 2006) &  May be useful to foregroundAcademic Enterprise – Policy successful dev’t of high-and Operational Guidelines quality peer-reviewed(November 2006) resources as a criteria for appointment & promotion•Admin Handbook is a collection ofcommonly used administrative  Might usefully consider needpolicies and procedures; for support – persons who combine both IT / technical•Academic Enterprise (income- expertise with pedagogicalgenerating projects) is one of the expertise – and can usefullyareas covered by the academic policy support discipline experts.framework. 22/03/12 KeMU Policy and OER Workshop 20
  • Student Code of Conduct & StudentOrganisation ConstitutionPolicy Position / Objective Relevance to Collaboration / OERStudents’ Code of Conduct  Code provide guidance reand Discipline (3rd Ed, March 2009); plagiarism or copyright.KeMU Student Organisation  List of work which studentsConstitution (May 2006) might undertake for the•These two documents govern university could include support for OER developmentstudent affairs at KeMU  Provision for an ODL Rep to help KeMU “ensure materials are issued on time” and “are relevant to the course requirements” gives useful framework for student engagement in the development and review of learning resources. 22/03/12 KeMU Policy and OER Workshop 21
  • Records Management PolicyPolicy Position / Objective Relevance to Collaboration / OER• draft policy stemming from the belief that ‘The University is wholly  Current focus is student dependent on its records for the records. efficient and effective discharge of  Policy might usefully consider: its academic responsibilities ... [and • Guidelines for management and so] ... This policy document provides and outlines the archiving of the institution’s OER. framework for the management of • Systems to ensure that learning the University records with a view resources are quality assured and of ensuring that the university copyright cleared prior to release as creates and retains only those OER and that the correct version of records that are necessary. necessary the resource is released. 22/03/12 KeMU Policy and OER Workshop 22
  • Common Regulations andProcedures for Postgraduate StudiesPolicy Position / Objective Relevance to Collaboration / OER• Draft document (Dec 2008) sets out the expectations and  Section 8 (g) which deals with requirements for postgraduate IPR issues could be expanded study. to a more general policy on plagiarism, copyright and Creative Commons issues  KeMU could consider: • if to make post Graduate research reports, dissertations and theses widely available as OER. • If so, would need to assert institutional copyright (perhaps non- exclusive) 22/03/12 KeMU Policy and OER Workshop 23
  • Policy Implications – OER, ODL &eLearningThe mission of the ODLM department is to design, produce and distribute (DPD) the most suitable course materials for ODL mode teaching and learning at the most convenient time and place. (ODLM Department, Policy & Operational Guidelines, June 25, ‘07 & Feb 4, ‘08)22/03/12 KeMU Policy and OER Workshop 24
  • ODL Systems Policy Policy Area Relevance to collaboration and/or OER Issues/ObjectivesType of DE system • Campus based, organisation • Sharing of research, guidelines, process documents(ODLM 2008, Sect A) based, individual based and quality criteria can help KeMU ODLM make • Self-paced or programme informed decisions about which DE model(s) will be based most appropriate to its needs in future. • Open access • Policy should clearly articulate the criteria for making • Single, dual-mode, judgements about appropriate teaching and learning partnership service provider strategies to suit particular purposes and target audiences.Choosing the appropriate • Print, audio/visual, web- • Open licences for materials will facilitate cost-effectivetechnology for based or a mix production and distribution of materialsdistribution and materials • Access implications of • Access to course materials from other institutionsand for interaction with choice committed to OER can be an effective, rapid strategystudents • Training implications of to secure materials for courses where no materials(ODLM 2008, Sect A (4)) choice exist / might allow use of media that would not have • Cost – including been affordable if KeMU needed to develop maintenance and everything itself. sustainability • Resource dev’ t guidelines should explicitly require that no completely new development should happen without first checking that suitable resources do not already exist as OER and where new development is sanctioned that maximum use is made of existing OER as resources e.g. graphics from Flickr. 22/03/12 KeMU Policy and OER Workshop 25
  • Business Planning & Costing Policy Issues/Objectives Relevance to collaboration and/or OER• Philosophy and objectives • Clear policy indications are needed that materials development is• Capital and recurrent costs considered important by KeMU and that there is commitment to • planning investing in it • implementation • Policy positions are essential to ensure high quality of materials and • maintenance and updating effective collaboration and this is indicated by allocation of • fixed and variable appropriate resources including staff time• Self-financing or subsidised? • It may be necessary to include specific references to collaborative• Courses portfolio (e.g. length of study) activities to ensure that funds are set aside to cover the time of academic staff from KeMU participating in such collaborative• Course development and production process (e.g. activities team, individual contract) • Sharing of course materials may reduce requirements to pay sub-• Course delivery contracting fees for materials development, as it may open access • Enrolment to already developed course materials in key areas of need • Tutorial system • Participation in materials development/OER collaborations could • Materials dispatch generate consultancy funds, providing an alternative income stream • Assessment to the university and its staff and financial returns on capital • Record keeping investment in line with current KeMU policy • Marketing • Funding 22/03/12 KeMU Policy and OER Workshop 26
  • HR Policy for ODLMPolicy Issues/Objectives Relevance to collaboration and/or OER • Most academic staff will be discipline experts rather than materials• Staff complement developers – OER Africa and its partners can help ODLM with the further development of skills related to materials development• Staff development • Staff awareness processes should include awareness about• Staff workload changing intellectual property parameters introduced by growth of ICT, and accompanying introduction to open licences like the Creative Commons • Consideration might be given to the notion that staff participating in collaborative activities and materials development exercises that are over and above their normal workload can receive remuneration for their time spent (e.g. by Extended Agreement/ private Work – however, in the long term if DE provision accelerates – job descriptions will need to be adapted so that time is allocated to programme development, course design and materials production as a core activity) • Policy should commit the institution to a team work approach to resource development in order to harness effectively content, pedagogic and technical expertise – it is rare that all the necessary competences reside in a single person. 22/03/12 KeMU Policy and OER Workshop 27
  • Program Dev’t Policy for ODLMPolicy Issues/Objectives Relevance to collaboration and/or OER • Facilitated by use and adaptation of OER• Buy, make or adapt • Facilitated by systematic analysis of current copyright status of• Media choice and/or mix existing materials, and efforts to ensure that all materials can be• Instructional design freely updated and revised without securing additional permissions.• Developmental testing • Existing OER available on the Internet and materials available from others can support review processes and cost-effective updating of• Production courses• Delivery • Establishment of licensing frameworks relevant to digitized• Updating materials (e.g. Creative commons) will be essential to protect rights• Storage of KeMU – so KeMU will still need to decide how to share resources for which it claims the copyright • Essential to define terms of use of all materials within a digital repository, which will be facilitated by systematic materials audit and establishment of systems to manage KeMU’s knowledge base • Shared course materials and OER can be used to increase number of available materials in digital repository without significant additional cost • Collaboration with others will facilitate such access, as will ongoing integration of KeMU into emerging global OER networks.. 22/03/12 KeMU Policy and OER Workshop 28
  • Monitoring, Evaluation & QA Policy for ODLPolicy Issues/Objectives Relevance to collaboration and/or OER• Who is the evaluation for? • Completing a systematic audit of materials and their (e.g. politicians, managers, licences will create a clear legal framework to guide staff educational staff) and students.• The level of monitoring • Maintaining proper licences that facilitate use and adaptation of materials further supports this. (e.g. system level, course/programme level, • The sharing of research, guidelines, process documents and individual tutor or individual quality criteria can help KeMU make informed decisions learner) about suitable models for managing a quality assurance system in an ODL context.• Capability to act on findings of evaluation, monitoring and quality assurance• Quality assurance systems 22/03/12 KeMU Policy and OER Workshop 29
  • ODLM Policy Considerations Policy pertaining to copyright of KeMU ODL learning resources could be expanded in regard to OER • e.g. procedures to check & clear copyright within materials ODLM Draft Contracts include provision for versioning / editions and guidelines such as use of Harvard referencing system • These guidelines could usefully be adopted across the entire institution22/03/12 KeMU Policy and OER Workshop 30
  • ODLM Policy Conclusions KeMU already has strategic intent and implementation strategy that supports collaboration and the systematic deployment of OER Some gaps in the current policy framework – particularly regarding an effective policy for locating materials development within a much larger curriculum design process Should be addressed if the institution is keen to exploit the potential of collaborative efforts in materials development and the potential of OER. Without modification of the policy environment to address these gaps, it will be difficult to harness this potential in a systematic and sustainable way.22/03/12 KeMU Policy and OER Workshop 31
  • Key Considerations for KeMU KeMU’s existing policy framework is largely supportive of increased collaboration, sharing of course materials, and harnessing of OER – although it is also clear that current policy was developed prior to considerations of the possibility of working with OER. A key policy statement that could be beneficial would pertain to the Intellectual Property Rights and Copyright of staff, students and the institution - with regard to learning resources developed in the normal course of learning and teaching and how these might be shared. Policy must make clear and unequivocal statements on IPR and Copyright relating to learning resources developed in the course of work – currently the ODLM guidelines refer specifically to development that has been outsourced.22/03/12 KeMU Policy and OER Workshop 32
  • Plenary discussion (1) Questions and clarifications: 2. If an academic staff member develops a learning resource during KeMU time using KeMU resources and not in relation to an ODLM contract, does copyright in the resulting product vest with KeMU? Does the academic have any rights in respect of this material? 3. If an academic staff member develops a learning resource outside KeMU time using KeMU resources and not in relation to an ODLM contract, does copyright in the resulting product vest with KeMU or the academic?22/03/12 KeMU Policy and OER Workshop 33
  • Plenary discussion (2) Questions and clarifications: 2. If an academic staff member develops a learning resource outside KeMU time using his/her own resources and not in relation to an ODLM contract, does copyright in the resulting product vest with KeMU or the academic? 3. If another member of staff or a student contributes to the development of the learning resource – e.g. by providing learning design advice, developing graphic material etc., does he/she have any rights in respect of this material? 4. Where are / should the answers to these questions stated?22/03/12 KeMU Policy and OER Workshop 34
  • Break-Out Sessions1. Should KeMU commit itself to sharing resources with others? If so, on what basis?  Under what license conditions?  All at once or gradually?2. What kinds of policies need to be put in place regarding materials development and Intellectual Property Rights that are not currently in place?3. How should policy at KeMU regarding salaries, incentives, etc. change to reflect staff inputs into materials development (and collaborative processes in this area)?4. What steps need to be followed to create the appropriate policy environment for KeMUin relation to the above issues?22/03/12 KeMU Policy and OER Workshop 35
  • Thank youCatherine Ngugi Neil ButcherProject Director OER Strategistcatherine.ngugi@gmail.com neilshel@icon.co.za