Infrastructure in Africa - February 2009.
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Infrastructure in Africa - February 2009.

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The data makes it easy to apply a deficit model to project planning, but we need to start with what we have and how we can build off it OER projects must work with what is available now, not ...

The data makes it easy to apply a deficit model to project planning, but we need to start with what we have and how we can build off it OER projects must work with what is available now, not demonstrate what would be possible if only the constraints were different but paradoxically we must hold in our minds a vision of a radically different future from the one that current trends project – change is always surprising because it takes so much longer to happen than people think it will but happens so much quicker than they expect

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Infrastructure in Africa - February 2009. Infrastructure in Africa - February 2009. Presentation Transcript

  • Infrastructure in Africa
  • ICT Indicators from ITU 2007 Main telephone lines – 3.77/100 people Mobile subscribers – 27.48/100 people Internet users – 5.34/100 people Africa has some 280 million total telephone subscribers, of which some 260 million (over 85%) are mobile cellular subscribers, representing the continent with the highest ratio of mobile to total telephone subscribers of any region in the world.(ITU World Telecommunication/ICT Indicators, 2007)
  • ICT Indicators from ITU 2007 It is the region with the highest mobile cellular growth rate. Growth over the past 5 years averages almost 65% year on year. It accounts for 14% of the world’s population, but for only around 7% of all fixed and mobile subscribers worldwide. It has some 50 million Internet users, for an Internet penetration of just 5%. Europe’s Internet penetration is 8 times higher. It has a broadband penetration of more than 1% in only a few countries. Broadband penetration in OECD countries exceeds 18%.(ITU World Telecommunication/ICT Indicators, 2007)
  • Bandwidth Costs1997-2001 $ 20 Kbps2002 $ 13 Kpbs2003 $ 8.90 Kbps2004 $ 5.0 Kbps2004 $ 4.2 Kbps2005 $ 2.33 KbpsFuture $ 1.00 Kbps or less
  • 51 52 50 UbuntuNet Medium Term Plan 48 33/E22 E5 43/E8 43 36/E20 38/E18 43 E3 E4 49 20 4 37/E19 E13 46/E8 1 38/E18 44 32 39/E15 E2 47 45 2 3 15 Links: 6 17 5 34Actual 56 19 9 o 14 7Funded/Costed 16 8 11 13UA 21 10 29 12 31 24 30 25Alternative/Later 22 27 28 18 23 26
  • What Does It Mean? The data makes it easy to apply a deficit model to project planning, but we need to start with what we have and how we can build off it OER projects must work with what is available now, not demonstrate what would be possible if only the constraints were different BUT paradoxically we must hold in our minds a vision of a radically different future from the one that current trends project – change is always surprising because it takes so much longer to happen than people think it will but happens so much quicker than they expect
  • What Does it Mean? OER projects will never resolve infrastructure gaps, but they can help to build demand Given all of the above, the constraint is not infrastructure, it is institutional capacity OER provides the tools to build that capacity from any starting point, and the problem is not a lack of human capacity, it is a lack of opportunity