Rights Cameras Action!
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Rights Cameras Action!

on

  • 4,075 views

Young people across the UK, including disabled young people, homeless young people and young carers, explore the relevance and importance of children's rights in their lives. ...

Young people across the UK, including disabled young people, homeless young people and young carers, explore the relevance and importance of children's rights in their lives.

16th December 2011 is the 20th anniversary of the UK signing up to the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC), which sets down what all children under 18 should have for their healthy and happy development.

This slideshow contains just a few of the photographs from a multimedia resource aimed at engaging and informing young people around children's rights, available at www.rightscamerasaction.org.uk

For more info visit www.photovoice.org

Statistics

Views

Total Views
4,075
Slideshare-icon Views on SlideShare
1,630
Embed Views
2,445

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
7
Comments
0

4 Embeds 2,445

http://www.photovoice.org 2427
http://photovoice.org 12
http://translate.googleusercontent.com 5
http://207.46.192.232 1

Accessibility

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Rights Cameras Action! Rights Cameras Action! Presentation Transcript

    •  
    • 16th December 2011 marks 20 years since the UK Government formally signed up to The United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC)
    • Article 2 The rights in the Convention are for any child, regardless of their abilities, race, gender or religion. The Convention applies to all children, whatever their race, religion or abilities; whatever they think or say, whatever type of family they come from. It doesn’t matter where children live, what language they speak, what their parents do, whether they are boys or girls, what their culture is, whether they have a disability or whether they are rich or poor. No child should be treated unfairly on any basis. © Emmanuel 2011/ Action for Children / PhotoVoice
    • Article 3 All adults should do what is best for children when making decisions that affect them. The best interests of children must be the most important concern for adults when making decisions that may affect them. When adults make decisions, they should think about how their decisions will affect children. “ Happy because mom and I are together!” © Claire Isaac / Action for Children / PhotoVoice
    • Article 4 The Government must make sure all the rights in the Convention are respected. Governments have a responsibility to do everything possible to make sure children’s rights are respected, protected and made real. When countries agree to follow the Convention, they agree to review their laws relating to children. They look at their social services, legal, health and education systems, and how much money they put towards each. Governments have to make sure that the minimum standards set by the Convention in these areas are being met. They must help families protect children’s rights so that children have as many opportunities as possible. In some cases, this may involve changing existing laws or making new ones. “ There's thousands of houses and they cannae give me or anyone else who's homeless one.” © Sarah Mc Intyre 2010 / Fairbridge / PhotoVoice, From Waiting, Scotland
    • Article 5 All children should have support and advice about their rights from their parents as they grow. Parents have the right and the responsibility to help their children learn about their rights and how to use them. The government should not do anything to stop parents being able to guide their children and help them make good decisions. The government should support parents to do this well. © Emmanuel 2011 / Action for Children / PhotoVoice "These bridges are like paths, and show that every child has the right to be given guidance by their parents or family."
    • Article 6 Children have the right to live, and the government should make sure every child has everything they need to grow up healthy. "I am feeling life!" © Taylor Lavender 2011 / Action for Children / PhotoVoice
    • Article 7 Children have the right to a name and a nationality. All children have the right to a legally registered name, and to belong to a country, both officially recognised and recorded by the government. “ Culture and headscarves which make the girls look the identical and yet a reflection in the window makes four girls so it represents who they want to be and being able to identify with themselves and others in their culture.” © Dinah 2011 / Action for Children / PhotoVoice
    • Article 8 Children have the right to an identity. Children have the right to an identity – an official record of who they are. Governments should respect children’s right to a name, a nationality and links to a family. "I was trying to find things that represent identity. People make choices, expressing their individuality, for example, about a haircut which might may them look out of the ordinary. Only when I looked back at the picture did I notice the sign saying Asia, Africa, World." © Emmanuel 2011 / Action for Children / PhotoVoice
    • Article 9 Children have the right to live with their parent(s), unless it is bad for them. Children have the right to live with their parents, unless it is bad for them. If your parents don't live together you have the right to stay in contact with both parents, unless this might be dangerous for you. “ Separation is emptiness.” © Claire Isaac 2011 / Action for Children / PhotoVoice
    • Article 10 Every child has the right to leave any country and go into their own country to be with their parents. If people in the same family live in different countries they should be allowed to move between those countries so that parents and children can stay in contact, or get back together as a family. © Emmanuel 2011 / Action for Children / PhotoVoice
    • Article 11 Children should be protected from being kidnapped and taken out of the country illegally. The government should make sure children cannot be taken out of their country when it is not legal, including by their parents. “ The crocodile will eat the man. Children have the right to be protected from being kidnapped and taken out of the country.” © Dinah 2011 / Action for Children / PhotoVoice
    • Article 12 Children's views should be respected by adults. When adults are making decisions that affect children, children have the right to say what they think should happen and have their opinions considered. This does not mean that children can now tell their parents what to do! © Rachel Jones / Action for Children / PhotoVoice "It's good to be listened to."
    • Article 12 Children's views should be respected by adults. © Rachel Jones / Action for Children / PhotoVoice “ It's important people listen to me and respect my opinions because otherwise I wouldn't have a say in where I had to live. I might end up in some hole!”
    • Article 12 Children's views should be respected by adults. © Zoe Omagh / Action for Children / PhotoVoice "What is the point of talking when you are not listened to?"
    • Article 13 Freedom of expression. Children have the right to get and share information, as long as the information is not damaging to them or others. The freedom of expression includes the right to share information in any way they choose, including by talking, drawing or writing. © Mhairi & Siobha / Action for Children / PhotoVoice
    • Article 14 Children have the freedom to choose what to believe and what religion to follow. Children have the right to think and believe what they want and to practise the religion they choose to, as long as they are not stopping other people from enjoying their rights. “ This is me with another Christian. It shows people sharing the same belief.” © Jacob Smith / Action for Children / PhotoVoice
    • Article 15 Children have the right to meet with friends and to join groups and clubs. Children have the right to meet with friends and to join groups and organisations, as long as it does not stop other people from enjoying their rights. “ Friends are always there when you have a problem.” © Laura Jones / Action for Children / PhotoVoice
    • Article 15 Children have the right to meet with friends and to join groups and clubs. "It is lonely without friends.” © Laura Jones / Action for Children / PhotoVoice
    • Article 15 Children have the right to meet with friends and to join groups and clubs. “ Friends protect us.” © Arrol Tissle / Action for Children / PhotoVoice
    • Article 17 Children have the right to information through the media. Children should be able to use radio, television and newspapers to find out information, and the government should make sure the media make information that children can understand and that is not harmful to them. Children should also be able to read books that are for people of their age. “ Children should have the right to access the media and information.” © Emmanuel 2011 / Action for Children / PhotoVoice
    • Article 19 Children have the right to be protected from harm. Children have the right to be protected from being hurt and mistreated, physically or mentally. Governments should ensure that children are properly cared for and protect them from violence, abuse and neglect by their parents, or anyone else who looks after them. “ She is crying, didn't speak, and hiding. I want people to speak when they need help.” © Nichole / Action for Children / PhotoVoice
    • Article 19 Children have the right to be protected from harm. © 2010 Sadie / Walsall Street Teams / National Working Group / PhotoVoice From Having Our Say, UK “ This represents a time in my life, when I felt alone and had nobody to turn to.”
    • Article 20 Children who cannot live with their parents have the right to special care and protection. “ It is hard to find somewhere to live.” © Jonathan / Action for Children / PhotoVoice Children who cannot be looked after by their own family have a right to special care and must be looked after properly, by people who respect their ethnic group, religion, culture and language.
    • Article 21 Children have the right to care and protection if they are adopted. Children have the right to the best possible care and protection if they are adopted or in foster care. This right is the same if the child is adopted in the country where they were born, or if they are taken to live in another country. “ I love this picture because it shows a warm loving environment where my kitten can sleep looking as cute as she does.” © Charlotte 2010 / Walsall Street Teams / National Working Group / PhotoVoice From Having Our Say, UK
    • Article 21 Children have the right to care and protection if they are adopted. © 2010 Charlotte / Walsall Street Teams / National Working Group / PhotoVoice From Having Our Say, UK "I chose this picture because Jodie means a lot to me and has helped me get through my life as much as she possibly could. Without this girl I’d be nothing. Her and her family gave me somewhere to live when everything was going wrong in my home life, without Jodie and her family I don’t know where I’d be today.”
    • Article 23 Children who have a disability have the right to special care. “ This is me if I didn't have special care - I wouldn't be able to do anything with my life.” © Ebony Robinson / Action for Children / PhotoVoice Children who have any kind of disability have the right to special care and support, as well as all the rights in the Convention, so that they can live full and independent lives.
    • Article 24 Children have the right to the best possible health and medical care. “ Children have the right to the best health possible.” © Dinah 2011 / Action for Children / PhotoVoice Children have the right to the best health care possible – to safe drinking water, food that is good for you, a clean and safe place to spend time, and information to help them stay healthy.
    • Article 25 Children who are looked after away from home should be checked on regularly. “ Nobody would like to live in a place like this. Its burnt and it would be embarrassing to invite your friends.” © Christina 2011 / Action for Children / PhotoVoice Children who are looked after by their local authorities, rather than their parents, have the right to have their living arrangements looked at regularly to see if they are the best for them.
    • Article 27 Children have the right to a standard of living that allows them to develop properly. “ This shows the same young person who doesn't have enough - and has to look for food in bins.” © Leseley, Mel & Monique / Action for Children / PhotoVoice Children have the right to a good standard of living that means they can grow healthy and happy. The government should help families who cannot give their children this.
    • Article 28 Children have the right to an education. All children have the right to a primary and secondary education. Punishments for bad behaviour or bad work should not make you feel embarrassed or humiliated. “ That's me when I got 5 A's for my school report for this year.” © Arrol Tissle / Action for Children / PhotoVoice
    • Article 29 Education should help children become the best they can, and teach them to respect others. Education should develop each child’s personality, talents and abilities as much as possible. It should teach children how important it is to respect other people's rights and other cultures and ways of living. It should also help them learn to live peacefully, protect the environment and respect other people. “ The runner in first place is really fast. Everyone stopped to watch him, even the jumpers at the front. It made me think about the importance of developing talent in young people.” © Emmanuel / Action for Children / PhotoVoice
    • Article 40 Children have the right to help in defending themselves and a fair trial if they are accused of breaking the law. Governments must make sure that children who are accused of breaking the law are given help in defending themselves, and that their rights are respected. "Taking advantage of power angers others." © Larkland Gilbert 2011 / Chapter 1 / PhotoVoice From Lookout London, UK
    • Article 42 The government must make sure children and adults know about children's rights. “ This is me when I'm older teaching other children about rights and other stuff.” © Jacob Smith / Action for Children / PhotoVoice