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Employee Owned Device European white paper done by Verizon and Cisco

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This Employee Owned Device (EOD) report was produced by Verizon and Cisco European experts. The report focuses on the EOD phenomenon in Europe (or BYOD), factors driving adoption and key …

This Employee Owned Device (EOD) report was produced by Verizon and Cisco European experts. The report focuses on the EOD phenomenon in Europe (or BYOD), factors driving adoption and key considerations for businesses when planning their EOD strategy

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  • 1. EMPLOYEE OWNED DEVICE AND THE MOBILE WORKSPACE A Verizon and Cisco Perspective In collaboration with
  • 2. Contents Executive summary ................................................................................................................................ 1 EOD is maturing – fast............................................................................................................................ 2 Unlocking the intrinsic value of EOD...................................................................................................... 4 IT need not be a barrier to growth ........................................................................................................ 4 Security and compliance ........................................................................................................................ 6 Network intelligence – the “IP” is the key ............................................................................................. 6 Cost and allocation ................................................................................................................................. 7 Supporting the EOD environment ......................................................................................................... 7 Developing a robust win-win strategy ................................................................................................... 8 Conclusion .............................................................................................................................................. 9 About Verizon Enterprise Solutions ....................................................................................................... 9 P a g e | Contents
  • 3. This paper, commissioned by Verizon and Cisco, examines the Employee Owned Device phenomenon in Europe, focusing on the factors that are driving adoption and the key considerations you’ll face when planning your EOD strategy. Users demand the freedom, spontaneity and availability of mobile and portable devices, in reality, their demand to work where they want to and how they want to, is outstripping the pace at which many businesses choose to react. If allowed to use the devices, applications and cloud services they prefer, and the time and location for work, employees have the potential to drive the next wave or corporate efficiency and productivity. Both Forrester and Gartner have identified consumerisation of IT as possibly the decade’s most disruptive trend. It is a trend which simply cannot be ignored. Executive summary Successive generations of technologies are forcing their way into the workplace in response to user demand, economic pressures and the overriding desire for competitive advantage. Many enterprises are starting to translate such disruption in to opportunity. There is no greater example of this than the EOD phenomenon, which allows employees to choose which devices they prefer to use at work, just as they do in their personal lives. Implemented effectively, harnessing the benefits of intelligent personal devices within the business environment can bring significant benefits for the enterprise in terms of reduced hardware costs and greater flexibility for the employee, resulting in improved operational efficiencies, productivity and staff satisfaction and retention. Ignored, implemented poorly or in a fragmented fashion, EOD has the ability to become that badly behaved child, demanding huge investments in time, risk management and IT infrastructure; trying to keep one step ahead of this disruptive force can result in a series of tactical ‘dead ends’ that has the ability to disrupt the enterprise at all levels. Page |1
  • 4. Average Number of Connected Devices per Knowledge Worker, 2012 and 2014 2012 2014 3.2 2.8 3.2 2.9 2.7 2.6 2.3 2.3 2.2 1.8 Total U.S. U.K. Germany 2.4 2.3 2.0 France 1.8 Russia 3.1 3.0 2.8 2.3 2.5 1.8 China India Mexico Source: Cisco IBSG, 2012 Brazil N = 4,892 42% of smartphones and 38% of laptops used in the workplace are now employee-owned. By 2016, 66% of the mobile workforce will own a smartphone and 40% of the global workforce will be mobile (Gartner research 2012). The average number of individual devices per user in the enterprise is on the rise across the globe. EOD is here to stay. Steps must be taken to ensure companies are addressing EOD securely and effectively. Old IT models will mature to the point where they are rendered an historical footnote. The pace of innovative change and the dynamics of global competition have created a new reality for many organisations. Organisational structures are increasingly collaborative and their complexity is commensurate with that change. Myriad pressures are changing the relationship between business, technology and the IT organisation. As the lines between personal and professional lives blur, security is no longer just a question of how to keep people out; it is also a question of how to let people in. IT has to balance security and enablement; IT has to bridge the gap between the pace of user demand and the protection of the organisation. By cultivating EOD with effective management and governance, companies can move from merely reacting to the disruption to harnessing a potent source of value. EOD is maturing – fast According to research by Gartner, half of the world’s companies will seek their workers to individually provide devices for work by 2017. According to Ovum’s EOD research study, 56.8% of employees are using a personal device as part of their professional activity. Compared to the previous edition of the survey, conducted in 2012, the practice of EOD among professionals is globally stable for a year. Over a third of employees are using their personal device to do work without informing the IT department. The number of employees using tablets has increased from 28.4% to 44.5% in the last 12 months, suggesting that businesses increasingly see these devices on their networks. Many organisations are trying to stay ahead of the demand curve therefore, and are finding innovative responses to the changing mobility landscape. However, in Europe especially, EOD has been viewed as something that was ‘happening to’ the organisation, that naughty child, without operational controls, disturbing the status quo, by gaining access to IT assets without an agreed framework. The reaction to this Page |2
  • 5. has been defensive, a fragmented guardian of IT security, driven by technology, often developed in isolation from the business. Many European IT leaders have been reluctant to support EOD among their employees consequently; they are seeing fewer employeeowned devices and a spike in non-approved applications. In short, they are reacting to minimise the threat rather than embracing it in order to improve the freedom of their employees to work the way they prefer. This has created a gap between the business need and the IT resolution. This potential gap has resulted in many organisations failing to realise the benefits available from EOD as the employee usage and demand outstrips the enterprises appetite and willingness to react. Denial and subsequent reactive defence are the usual starting point as an organisation wrestles with the EOD challenge. To embark on this journey with a tactical armoury may well solve tactical technology problems today, but winning businesses stop, think, evaluate then select the smartest strategic plan, maximising the EOD opportunity now and for the future. European enterprises could suffer in comparison to those in competing countries that are using EOD to realise employee-driven improvements in productivity, collaboration and execution. Tangible benefits are only realised as the organisation achieves acceptance and develops a workplace strategy that respects EOD as a valuable business driver and aligns proactively with the opportunity. “EOD is maturing faster than many companies can address or benefit from it” Page |3
  • 6. Unlocking the intrinsic value of EOD EOD is not just a tactical problem deserving of a purely technical solution. While the smart response to it involves a heavyweight technical understanding and ability to deliver specialist technical solutions, it is clear that we are dealing with a strategic business issue, which demands a strategic solution. With EOD, the enterprise can benefit from the greater agility and improved productivity an increasingly mobile workforce provides. Employees used to enjoy better technology at work than they had available to them at home. With the advent of smart devices this has reversed, giving rise to the demand of EOD delivering improved employee productivity, satisfaction and retention, as it corresponds more closely with the way in which they want to live and work. Customers and suppliers benefit too, as the business is able to respond more quickly and effectively to the changing needs of the entire supply chain. Doing nothing is not an option, yet some businesses are doing just that in the face of the EOD challenge. There are a growing number of businesses in Europe who recognise the need to act now to catch up with employee demand. And, of those, some are reacting to the inevitable while others are embracing it as a primary catalyst for strategic business growth. These benefits are only unlocked as measurable value when the EOD challenge is ‘reframed’ into positive thinking. If only defensive technology tactics are employed then the bigger picture and subsequent tangible benefits are diluted – or worse - destroyed in the mix. In short, only Enterprises that have an actionable strategy which not only supports but leverages this growing demand, will ever be able to unlock the intrinsic value of the EOD opportunity. IT need not be a barrier to growth “On average, 60% of employees use a mobile device for work — 13% more than are officially considered mobile workers” Designated Mobile Worker Use Mobile Device for Work 69% 67% 60% 58% 47% Total 58% 47% U.S. U.K. 50% 42% 52% 40% Germany France 55% 63% 59% 57% 51% 44% 48% 46% 37% Russia China India Mexico Brazil “60% of companies said that their users connect to their network with devices from outside the office, and more than 40% of companies do the same from inside the office” Page |4
  • 7. The consumerisation of technology and hardware, coupled with employee demand means that the EOD phenomenon continues to spread with or without IT. It has long been the case that many non-approved devices are introduced by executives within a business, regardless of existing IT protocols. Many were able to bypass policy, get connected and be supported. Therefore, it is unsurprising that most executive and management levels within a business are fully behind EOD, top down. Their employee base is driving demand from the bottom up. The result is simply put: IT is getting squeezed and is expected to find a way to make it work. Any discussion regarding EOD usually elicits concerns regarding data security, risk and compliance: often not with consideration of the benefits that new strictures of policy bring, but as a barrier to adoption. Most employees who own smartphones (67.8%) bring these devices to work, and 15.4% of those numbers do this without the knowledge of IT, and one fifth do so by challenging the rules of company’s anti-EOD policy. The thread that runs through is that IT is not always keeping up with the changing demands and behaviour patterns of the new mobilised, consumerised workforce. If employees are sourcing their own applications to do their job, then it could be that the enterprise and IT specifically is not delivering the right tools or a user experience for its employees. Mobility has become a mainstream event for nearly all enterprises and so too have the complexities for infrastructure which come with it. EOD and employee demands, plus user app fragmentation are growing at such a pace, that many companies find that their infrastructural capabilities are being stretched to the limit. In response, some businesses are now looking to utilise cloud based services to, for example, provide mobile device management and private app stores for their workforce. This is a part of a natural progression to enterprise mobility as a service (EMaaS) – a move which relocates most or all of the services normally provided by IT internal systems - device management, security management, app deployment and policy enforcement, to third party, cloud based services. Percentage of companies that find security the top EOD challenge 38% 33% 26% 23% 36% 25% 22% 19% 14% Total U.S. U.K. Germany France Russia China India Mexico 17% Brazil “The perceived danger of EOD to corporate network security is likely a major reason that companies in Europe have not embraced the trend as fully as others. Apart from China, European countries are the most concerned with the negative effects of EOD on the security of corporate networks. Interestingly, the concern over network security has not made Chinese companies reluctant to embrace EOD, since they believe the benefits far outweigh the potential costs” Page |5
  • 8. CIOs have a love/hate relationship with EOD Love:  Reduces cost of hardware acquisition and upgrades  Improves productivity  Enables agility and responsiveness  Increases employee satisfaction Hate:  Increases security threat  Creates a non-standardise environment  Increases support complexities  Technology roadmap poorly defined Security and compliance It is clear that long held worries over lost or stolen devices and network security remain at the top of corporate concerns, and as mobility increases, so does the associated threat for many businesses. In many heavily regulated sectors, such as banking, health, education and public, nothing can be allowed to compromise corporate, business and customer data records, or lead to any wavering from the road to compliance. However, many of the security risks and issues that come to mind when considering EOD adoption from the IT department’s perspective pre-exist EOD, simply in another guise. Very few organisations have robust policies in place to regulate and monitor printed matter being taken Network intelligence – the “IP” is the key The network touches everything – and no device with an IP address gets on or off the network without IPAM (IP Address Management). This makes the IPAM platform the network intelligence authority that holds the unique and critical data relationships between IP addresses, devices, users, physical location and network activity. The IP address is a unique network identifier assigned to each and every device on a network. As such, offsite, fully-safeguarded remote access on PCs at an employee’s home or even how and when memory sticks are used. Sensitive company data has always been mobile and will continue to be so, simply accessed and transported in another way. The real opportunity EOD affords IT specialists is to re-evaluate how their organisation handles all aspects of their security requirements, build in upgraded technological solutions to deal with distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks, take advantage of the freedom provided by tight data, risk and compliance policies, utilise them to find solutions to pre-existing issues and embrace full EOD adoption. the IP address space holds enormous strategic value. The ability to centrally view and manage IP addresses within a business network with IPAM is the key to gaining network intelligence and insight. The rich source of network intelligence afforded by IPAM is essential for policy enforcement and to monitor which applications are being accessed, by whom, and how sensitive business data is being used. Together with the Domain Name System (DNS) and Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) core network services, IPAM is integral to the continued health and robustness of a network: Page |6
  • 9.  IPAM centrally manages and controls the network and addressing of personal device usage with the actual costs of managing an employee reimbursement process.  DNS connects any device to any Web site, application or other user  DHCP provisions each device’s connection to the network Whichever route is chosen by the business, any policy can only be as robust and accurate as the billing data it is provided by its vendors: the success of it is predicated upon the ease with which personal and business usage can be isolated. The IPAM platform consolidates all IPAM, DNS and DHCP data within a central network intelligence repository, enabling a business to better manage their networks and devices. To meet ever-rising expectations for business connectivity, an IPAM platform must deliver three key solutions:  Mobile security  Address management For many businesses today faced with EOD, it is likely that they will not have the technical capabilities in place to deal with the level of data manipulation and costs transparency required to prosecute such policies effectively.  Automation and self-service Without these three solutions, any business will not be able to gain the network intelligence required for successful network-dependent initiatives such as EOD, virtualisation and cloud services – much less take advantage of emerging technologies like machine-to-machine (M2M) and software-defined networking (SDN). Cost and allocation Even after the enterprise makes the choice between a corporate funded model (whereby employees choose their own mobile devices which are paid for and managed centrally) or makes employees responsible for all aspects of ownership, there is still one dilemma to resolve: how do they separate business and personal costs incurred through device usage? This can be an issue which is difficult enough to tackle when looking at voice related costs in isolation, but increases in complexity when one adds data related activity in to the mix. For a global business with a large workforce, the potential bills would be substantial. Further, with variable tariff charges over and above certain data usage levels, how would an enterprise adjudicate whether business or personal usage should be subject to lower or higher rates? Supporting the EOD environment As the range of devices within a company broadens, coupled with the increasing percentage of mobile workers within the global workforce, a smart, agile service and support structure is required. For the most part, mobile devices will be managed and supported by existing, finite IT departments. Implementing EOD programs should enable IT staff to be more productive because they are spending less time on general infrastructure upkeep, and IT staffing ratios should shift because support questions about smartphones and tablets are often easier and less complex to troubleshoot than PC configuration problems. This trend is part of a major shift to change the user perception of the IT team from a reactive organization or roadblock to that of a proactive organisation focused on enabling employees. Some businesses expect to achieve fewer help desk calls, both hardware and software related. Employees are familiar with and comfortable using their own devices, which eliminates training. If employees do have questions related to their personal devices, business can point them to their telecom operator or device manufacturer instead of the corporate help desk. Introducing more mobile applications into the program however, may drive an uptick in help desk calls and requests. When tackling the conundrum of which model to adopt, the enterprise needs to weigh up the costs Page |7
  • 10. EOD drives innovation for CIOs and the business by increasing the number of mobile application users in the workforce. Rolling out applications throughout the workforce presents myriad new opportunities beyond traditional mobile email and communications: applications such as time sheets, site check-in/check-out, and employee self-service HR applications and smarter business continuity planning are just a few examples. Expanding access and driving innovation could ultimately be the legacy of the EOD phenomenon. Developing a robust win-win strategy The consumerisation of IT is without doubt one of the most important factors impacting the enterprise arena over the last decade. That said, it requires a measured response – one which aligns the business objectives and ambitions with those of the workforce. As with many decisions when faced with an overwhelming of often polarising information, the truly smart path often lies somewhere in the middle – one which sits between, on the one hand, a highly rigid and overtly restrictive policy which could appear blinded to the blurring of employees’ work and personal lives, and the other, a laissez-faire approach where employees can decide to use any device they wish, unchecked. In short, a balance must be struck which satisfies the employee desires and business goals, meets compliance requirements throughout and creates a robust platform for IT support. Verizon understands the EOD challenges our customers face. Our clear goal is to work with our customers to create a strategic roadmap which ensures they are positioned to reap the commercial benefits driven by the increased productivity and collaboration offered by EOD, and then deliver hard against it. Page |8
  • 11. Conclusion By partnering with Verizon, conducting a strategic review of the impacts and opportunities within a business presented by EOD, creating a strategic roadmap for growth and implementing a EOD and Mobile Workspace strategy, organisations will be addressing some critical business concerns: responding to the consumerisation of mobility solutions and devices, plus support for more devices, smartphones and tablets, and extending internal systems for mobile access. Most importantly, they will be best positioned to benefit in five main functional areas: productivity, risk management and compliance, cost control, procurement and ecosystem management. As a result, the strategy we design with you will ensure that your business is fit for the purpose of realising the potential of empowerment through secure ‘anytime, anywhere’ access. Both the impact and the advantage of our Verizon solutions are company-wide. We work with our customers to create a workplace solution that takes full commercial advantage of mobility: cocreating a value enhancing solution that has positive impact to our customers’ balance sheet, their employees’ productivity and their commercial ambitions, by providing them with the key to unlock the intrinsic value of the EOD opportunity. Verizon Contributors Cisco Contributors Neil Cook, Stacey Goldsmith, Principal Consultant, UCC & Mobile Craig Cerasi, Business Development, Unified Workspace – Smart Solutions Head of Marketing Mobility Solutions Martin Patten, Gavan Egan, Business Development, Unified Workspace – Smart Solutions Cloud & Security EMEA Sales VP for Verizon Europe Paul Durzan, Director, Unified Workspace – Smart Solutions Fabien Gandola, Consulting SE, Unified Workspace – Smart Solutions Jason Freeth, Architect, Cisco IT About Verizon Enterprise Solutions Verizon Enterprise Solutions provides intelligent networks, cloud, mobility, managed security and machine-to-machine (M2M) solutions to the world's most successful companies. With industryspecific solutions and a full range of global wholesale offerings, Verizon Enterprise Solutions helps open new opportunities around the world for innovation, investment and business transformation. Visit verizonenterprise.com or the Verizon Enterprise Solutions News Room to learn more. Page |9
  • 12. Verizon Europe: http://www.verizonenterprise.com Cisco: www.cisco.com In collaboration with