Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Communication Breakdown
Communication Breakdown
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Communication Breakdown

14

Published on

For the fully abled person, interacting with a disabled individual can result in awkward and sometimes even offensive behavior. These interactions can be made even more difficult when there is a …

For the fully abled person, interacting with a disabled individual can result in awkward and sometimes even offensive behavior. These interactions can be made even more difficult when there is a perceived communication barrier, such as in the case of the deaf and hearing impaired.

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
14
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Communication Breakdown: A Guide to Interacting with the Deaf and Hearing Impaired For the fully abled person, interacting with a disabled individual can result in awkward and sometimes even offensive behavior. These interactions can be made even more difficult when there is a perceived communication barrier, such as in the case of the deaf and hearing impaired. While these encounters can seem stressful to the hearing person, who is not fluent in American Sign Language, there are a few things they can do and be aware of as they interact that will remove the awkward moments and leave both parties feeling comfortable and self-assured. Relax and Be Yourself First, it is vital that you calm down. Becoming stressed and anxious about the interaction will only increase the likelihood that you will fumble or behave in a manner which may be offensive to the other person. Those who are deaf and hearing impaired will be fluent in ASL, but they also read and write your language. You have means of communication available to you even if you are unable to vocalize your interaction. Remember that you do not need to raise your voice or speak ridiculously slow. The other person can tell that you are shouting or slowing way down. If they are deaf, it will not matter how loud you speak, they won’t be able to hear you either way. Many people who are hearing impaired know how to read lips and IF they need to you to repeat something that you have said too quickly, they will ask you to do so. It is very condescending to automatically assume that they have no means by which to understand you. When it comes to ASL, if you know or understand the language at all, feel free to utilize what language skills you do have. Like with any language, native speakers understand that every one may not be fluent in their language, and are usually very forgiving to those who are attempting to communicate in the language. Take your time as you go, and be honest about words you don’t know, or anything they have said that you don’t understand.
  • 2. Writing is Okay Do not be afraid to resort to pen and paper. As I have mentioned before, the deaf and hearing impaired who are familiar with ASL understand that not everyone speaks the same language that they do. Unlike with French or Chinese, individuals who are native to ASL happen to read and write the same language that we do; English. Neither you nor the individual with whom you are attempting to communicate will be diminished if you admit that you do not speak the same language. Your honesty allows both of you to communicate with respect and dignity, immediately removing both of you from having to resort to base gestures that the other may or may not understand. At the end, the key to a positive experience is respect. Respect yourself enough to communicate effectively, and respect them enough to know where your limits are. Don’t waste your time or theirs by attempting to resort to silly and awkward antics that may or may not communicate what you need effectively. Telephone communication with the deaf or hearing impaired presents an entirely new set of hurdles to overcome, but can be made easier with the help of the right equipment. Caption Call has all the information you need to help you find the best hearing loss phones.

×