Oracle Unified Inventory Management for Mobile Networks

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Oracle Unified Inventory Management for Mobile Networks

  1. 1. Oracle Communications Unified Inventory Management for Mobile Networks An Oracle Technical White Paper April 2007
  2. 2. Oracle Communications Unified Inventory Management For Mobile Networks INTRODUCTION .......................................................................................... 4 Oracle Unified inventory Management for mobile...................................... 5 Mobile Modeling........................................................................................... 5 Locations ................................................................................................... 6 Physical Equipment ................................................................................. 7 Parts............................................................................................................ 8 Physical Connections............................................................................... 9 Logical Devices......................................................................................... 9 Facilities/Circuits ...................................................................................11 Signaling...................................................................................................11 Bandwidth/Signal Types.......................................................................12 GSM Circuit Hierarchy..........................................................................13 UMTS Circuit Hierarchy.......................................................................13 Networks .................................................................................................14 Domains ..................................................................................................14 Inventory Functionality for Mobile..........................................................14 Add, Modify, Remove Locations.........................................................14 Add, Modify, Remove Equipment ......................................................14 Create, Modify, Remove Facilities and Circuits.................................14 Grooming/Rehoming Facilities and Circuits.....................................15 Circuit Termination to a Location.......................................................15 Upgrade/Downgrade Facility Capacity...............................................15 Libraries...................................................................................................15 Projects ....................................................................................................15 Reports.....................................................................................................16 Network Processes .....................................................................................16 Build New MSC Site..............................................................................16 Oracle Communications Unified Inventory Management for Mobile Networks Page 2
  3. 3. Build New BTS Sites (Cell Sites)..........................................................17 Add Capacity to BTS Site......................................................................18 Service Assurance .......................................................................................19 Fault Identification and Resolution.....................................................19 Fault Impact Determination.................................................................19 System Users................................................................................................20 Integration with Other Systems................................................................20 Conclusion........................................................................................................20 Oracle Communications Unified Inventory Management for Mobile Networks Page 3
  4. 4. Oracle Communications Unified Inventory Management for Mobile Networks INTRODUCTION Increasingly more mobile service providers are rolling out media-rich services to their customers. These types of services require more network bandwidth, capacity and performance than traditional voice services. Oracle Communications Unified Inventory Management provides a flexible and highly scalable network inventory management system for mobile service providers to manage their network resources and their network capacity. This paper provides a sample Oracle Communications Unified Inventory Management model for mobile networks and its various GSM, GPRS and UMTS components, describes some typical mobile network processes and how they can be supported by the system, identify the typical system users and also identify possible integration with other systems to further support the engineering and operation of a mobile network.. It is not unusual that Mobile Service Providers operate a mixed technology network with GSM, GPRS and 3G equipment based largely on established circuit switched network technology and IP-based packet switched networks. However, • Mobile networks also have their own specific physical and logical characteristics (i.e. fixed microwave links, Abis interface, specific devices, etc). • Service fulfillment is very different in the mobile environment. It is historically just adding new subscribers to services by updating databases (e.g. HLR) although nextgen services are much more complex bundling of on and off net offerings but neither require any assignment of resources or capacity from the actual network, and certainly no specific network build. • Mobile service providers are still provisioning their network for optimization especially when they add new cells. Oracle Communications Unified Inventory Management provides a flexible and highly scalable network inventory management system for mobile service providers to manage their network resources and their network capacity. This paper provides a sample Oracle Communications Unified Inventory Management model for mobile networks and its various GSM, GPRS and UMTS components, describes some typical mobile network processes and how they can be supported by the system, identify the typical system users and also identify possible integration with other systems to further support the engineering and operation of a mobile network. Oracle Communications Unified Inventory Management for Mobile Networks Page 4
  5. 5. ORACLE UNIFIED INVENTORY MANAGEMENT FOR MOBILE Mobile ModelingOracle Communications Unified Inventory Management supports the continuity of the mobile technology evolution and will enable mobile service providers to operate a mix of technologies, owned/leased, Layer-1/2/3 Networks. Oracle Unified Inventory Management enables Mobile Service Providers to model and manage the components shown in the figures below and to obtain a single view of their multi-technology mobile network. Figure 1- GSM Evolution to GPRS Figure 1 shows an example of coexisting GSM and GPRS technologies. Oracle Communications Unified Inventory Management supports the continuity of the mobile technology evolution and will enable mobile service providers to operate a mix of technologies, owned/leased, Layer-1/2/3 Networks. Figure 2 - GPRS Evolution to UMTS (3GPP R99) Figure 2 shows an example of coexisting GPRS and UMTS technologies. Based on the GSM core network infrastructure, UMTS enables GSM operators to integrate Oracle Communications Unified Inventory Management for Mobile Networks Page 5
  6. 6. the technology into their existing networks. Oracle Communications Unified Inventory Management provides efficient functionality for network optimization – grooming, re-homing and cell site construction. The following objects are not included in the model as they are either not useful in the Inventory system (e.g. dynamic mobile connections), cannot be implemented in the Inventory system (e.g. RF coverage modeling) or are better implemented in other systems (e.g. mobile terminals). • BTS to mobile links • Cell coverage areas • Mobile equipment – terminals and SIMs • Mobile Service Subscribers The following describes a model that may be used in Inventory system for mobile networks. It is presented to illustrate how the basic mobile components may be modeled. It may serve as a general starting point but would be modified as necessary to meet the requirements (i.e. naming conventions, parts and asset configuration) of a specific implementation. The description that follows identifies the major entities used in the model. For each entity, the containment relationships are identified (where applicable) as well as any added (user defined) attributes; the standard attributes for the particular entity type are not listed. Locations All sample location type objects will have the standard attributes required in the metadata. Additional user defined attributes will be defined (i.e. Name/ID); other attributes may be added as required for the specific location type, some of which are identified below. Country – country in which network sites are located –(not required if entire network is in a single country) Oracle Communications Unified Inventory Management provides efficient functionality for network optimization – grooming, re-homing and cell site construction. • Contained by System Root Region – operational region defined by network operator • Contained by Country City/Area – local area identifier used to subdivide region • Contained by Region MSC Site – Mobile Switching Center Site – location of the mobile switch, RNC, VLR, HLR etc. – also probable home of BSC • Contained by City/Area • Attributes (Address, Latitude, Longitude or other coordinate system) Oracle Communications Unified Inventory Management for Mobile Networks Page 6
  7. 7. BSC Site – Base Station Controller Site – optional – location of BSC, if not located at MSC Site • Contained by MSC Site • Attributes (Address, Latitude, Longitude or other coordinate system) BTS Site – Base Station Transceiver Site (or Cell Site) – location of BTS, tower, antennas etc. • Contained by City/Area • Attributes (Address, Latitude, Longitude or other coordinate system) POP – location of the other network equipment • Contained by City/Area • Attributes (Address, Latitude, Longitude or other coordinate system) PSTN/PDN Site – site where access to PSTN/PDN is provided – optional • Contained by City/Area • Attributes ( Address, Owner of Site) Physical Equipment The entities listed are for a basic mobile implementation and do not include any equipment that may be used in the transport network, e.g. multiplexers, SDH ADMs, microwave equipment. Similarly additional equipment that may be used at the MSC site, e.g. cross connect switches, voice mail systems, etc. are not included. These may be added as required for a particular implementation. This example generally uses European signal types and technologies (PDH, SDH), these may be changed to North American standards (TDM, SONET) if required. All physical equipment will have the standard attributes required in the metadata (part number, coordinates in parent, etc.). Additional user defined attributes will be defined for all equipment (Name/ID, Status and Serial number); other attributes may be added as required for the specific equipment type, some of which are identified below. Wall-mount – a free-standing or wall/pole mounted equipment cabinet • Contained by BTS Site Frame – an assembly of multiple racks or bays • Contained by MSC Site, BSC Site, Wall-mount Rack/Bay/Cabinet – standard mounting for shelves and panels • Contained by MSC Site, BSC Site, Frame, Wall-mount Panel – used support other components or modules in a rack or Wall-mount • Contained by Rack, Wall-mount Shelf – mounted in rack or Wall-mount to hold cards or modules, may contain slots Oracle Communications Unified Inventory Management for Mobile Networks Page 7
  8. 8. and sub-slots • Contained by Rack, Wall-mount Slot – contained in a shelf to hold a card, module or sub-slot. • Contained by Shelf Sub-slot – contained in a shelf or slot to hold a card or module. Some cards or modules may occupy more than one sub-slot, they can be placed in a slot instead. • Contained by Shelf, Slot Card – electronic assembly that mounts in a sub-slot or slot in a shelf • Contained by Sub-slot, Slot, Shelf Module – electronic assembly that mounts in a sub-slot or slot, on a panel or in an Wall-mount • Contained by Sub-slot, Slot, Shelf, Panel, Wall-mount Tower – object that holds antennas • Contained by BTS Site Antenna – device used to transmit radio frequencies • Contained by BTS Site • Attributes (Type, Frequencies, Azimuth, Downtilt, Elevation, Sector ID, Cell ID and Lac ID) • Associated to a list of neighboring frequencies Breaker – mounts on panel • Contained by Panel • Attributes (Current rating) Port – connector for signal mounted on a card or shelf. • Contained by Shelf, Slot, Card, Module, Antenna Power Port – power connector mounted on a card, shelf or module, connected to breaker to provide power • Contained by Card, Shelf, Module Parts At least one part type is required in the system to allow the physical equipment parts catalog to be built. Different part types are used where different part attributes are to be recorded. In this example the following part types are defined. Mounting – used for all parts used which do not consume power, primarily mounting equipment (rack, Wall-mount, panel) Oracle Communications Unified Inventory Management for Mobile Networks Page 8
  9. 9. • Attributes (Part ID, Manufacturer, Manufacturer’s Part Number) Active – used for all parts that require power • Attributes (Part ID, Manufacturer, Manufacturer’s Part Number, Power required, Input Voltage) Antenna – used for antennas • Attributes (Part ID, Manufacturer, Manufacturer’s Part Number, Gain, Coverage Angle) Physical Connections Physical connections are used to connect physical ports. Their use is generally limited to tracking connections that do not appear as part of facilities/circuits that appear in the logical view of the system, for example power connections from a breaker to a shelf or module. In addition, for mobile applications, a physical connection may also be used to track details of the transceiver to antenna connection, as the characteristics of this connection are required to determine the actual radiated RF power. Several types of connections may be defined, each with their own attributes. Following are the connections defined in the sample system. Copper – for connections between breakers and power ports, etc. Coax – for connections between transceiver and antenna, • With attributes (ID, Cable Type, Length, Loss, Connector type) Logical Devices Logical device provides the functional view of physical equipment. Ports on the logical device are the termination points of facilities and circuits. Logical device contains logical ports. All logical devices will have the standard attributes required in the metadata. Additional user defined attributes will be defined for all logical devices (i.e. Name/ID); other attributes may be added as required for the specific equipment type, some of which are identified below. Mobile Switch – the MSC performs all necessary signalling functions in order to establish calls from and to mobile stations. Each MSC may have to interface a number of base stations and provides the network interface to the PSTN. • Contained by MSC Site GMCC – the Gateway Mobile Switching Center is a switch that controls mobile Oracle Communications Unified Inventory Management for Mobile Networks Page 9
  10. 10. terminating calls. When a call is established towards a subscriber, a GMSC contacts the HLR of that subscriber, to obtain the address of the MSC where that subscriber is currently registered. That MSC address is used to route the call to that subscriber. • Contained by MSC Site, BSC Site SGSN – the Serving GPRS Support Node is a high-speed packet switch as an access point to the GPRS network. It can serve multiple Mobile Stations (e.g. mobile phones, PDA, etc) and multiple Base Station Subsystems (BSS). • Contained by MSC Site, Site GGSN – the Gateway GPRS Support Node is to provide interconnection between the GPRS IP backbone network and the external Packet Data Network (PDN). The GGSN maintains a “one to many” relationship with SGSNs. • Contained by MSC Site, Site BSC – the Base Station Controller is the interface between the BTS and the MSC. BSC has a parallel Packet Controller Unit (PCU) which manages all packet streams • Contained by MSC Site, BSC Site BTS – the Base Station Transceiver • Contained by BTS Site Termination Panel - used to identify the demarcation point of leased facilities • Contained by BTS Site RNC – The Radio Network Controller provides control functionalities for one or more Node-Bs. The RNC in the UMTS network is similar to that of the BSC in the GPRS network • Contained by MSC Site Node-B – is often known as the “Cell site”. It provides the air interface between the MS and the wireless system. A Node-B and an RNC can be the same device. The Node-B in the UMTS network is similar to that of the BTS in the GPRS network. • Contained by MSC Site, BSC Site Logical Port – Logical port is a termination point for logical device. It is to interface with another logical device and support the manipulation of facilities between the logical devices. Oracle Communications Unified Inventory Management for Mobile Networks Page 10
  11. 11. • Contained by logical devices Facilities/Circuits In many mobile systems, microwave links are used to carry traffic from BTS sites to hub sites and then to the MSC. If this is the case, an additional facility type may be defined to identify a microwave facility. Physical and logical device may also be defined to model the microwave equipment. All facilities/circuits will have the standard attributes required in the metadata. Additional user defined attributes will be defined (i.e. Name/ID); other attributes may be added as required for the specific facility type, some of which are identified below: Facility – used to model capacity owned by the network operator Leased Facility – used for capacity that is leased from another telecom company, i.e. not owned by the cellular company • Attributes (Provider, Provider Circuit ID) Circuit – used to identify fixed network capacity that is assigned to a specific use and is not available for other purposes Trunk – used to identify inter-switch links, between MSCs or from MSC to PSTN Signaling The various entities in the mobile network are connected to one another through signaling networks. The following interfaces can be modeled as circuits. • A interface is the connection between MSC and BSC • Abis interface is the connection between BSC and BTS • B interface is the connection between MSC and VLR • C interface is the connection between MSC and HLR • D interface is the connection between HLR and VLR • E interface is the connection between MSC and MSC • lu interface is an external interface that connects the RNC to the Core Network (CN) • lub is an internal interface connecting the RNC with the Node B. • lur interface connects two RNCs with each other. Oracle Communications Unified Inventory Management for Mobile Networks Page 11
  12. 12. Bandwidth/Signal Types Technology Data Capability Data Transmission GSM (2G) 9.6Kbps or 14.4Kbps Circuit-Switched Data GPRS (2.5G) 128Kbps Packet Data UMTS (3G/W- CDMA) 144Kbps vehicular 384Kbps outdoors 2Mbps indoors Packet Data Table 1 – Data capability and transmission type of different mobile technologies Table 1 shows the required data capacity and transmission type of different mobile technologies modeled in the sample. Oracle Communications Unified Inventory Management calculates the capacity utilization of facilities and circuits between locations by signal type and technology. The following signal types are used in the sample model to represent the required data capacity shown in Table 1. These may be modified and additional signal types added as required for specific implementations. • SubRateE0/9k6 to represent 9.6Kbps • SubRateE0/14k4 to represent 14.4Kbps • E0 to represent 64Kbps which can carry 4 SubRateE0/9k6 or • E0x2 to represent 128Kbps • E0x6 to represent 384Kbps • E0x2.25 to represent 144Kpbs • E1 • E3 • STM-1 • Compressed VC (16Kbps) – used to represent the compressed voice channels carried to the BTS, one E0 may carry 4 compressed voice channels Oracle Communications Unified Inventory Management for Mobile Networks Page 12
  13. 13. GSM Circuit Hierarchy Figure 3 –Example of Abis Circuit Hierarchy Figure 3 shows an example of circuit hierarchy for an Abis interface. The individual E1 timeslot, GSM Circuit and Abis Interface can be modeled in Inventory. UMTS Circuit Hierarchy Figure 4 –Example of lub Circuit Hierarchy Figure 4 shows an example of circuit hierarchy for a lub interface. The lub is the interface between the Node-B and the RNC. Typically, multiple T1/E1 links from Oracle Communications Unified Inventory Management for Mobile Networks Page 13
  14. 14. each Node-B are aggregated to one or several ATM STM-1 links or one STM-4 link. The individual E1 timeslot, ATM Network and lub Interface can be modeled in Inventory. Networks The network capability of Inventory system may be used if required to represent SDH, ATM, Frame Relay or IP networks that may be used to carry the various facilities used in the network. If these networks are used, additional signal types may be added as necessary. Domains Domains allow the user to define views of the network to meet their requirements. Domains may show either sites or logical device and the connectivity between them. For examples: A domain may be created to show RAN (Radio Access Network) which contains MSC, BSCs and BTSs in the Public Land Mobile Network (PLMN). A domain may be created to show GPRS which contains BTSs, BSCs and IP routers (SGSN and GGSN) forward IP packets to users. Another domain may be created to show UTRAN which contains a number of Node-Bs and RNCs which make up the UMTS radio access network. Some mobile operators need GIS capability to plan, build and roll out core network infrastructure. We can map network element based on coordinates available/provided to Inventory system. Inventory Functionality for Mobile This section gives a brief overview of some of the Inventory system functionality that may be applied to the entities defined in the Inventory system model. Add, Modify, Remove Locations Locations of the types defined may be added, modified and removed as desired. Add, Modify, Remove Equipment Both physical and logical device may be added, modified and removed within the system. Create, Modify, Remove Facilities and Circuits Facilities (connectivity whose capacity is available for assignment) and circuits (facility capacity that is assigned for a particular purpose) may be created, modified and removed from the system. The various facility/circuit types defined in the model may be used to group particular types of facilities and circuits and provide Oracle Communications Unified Inventory Management for Mobile Networks Page 14
  15. 15. different sets of attributes as required. Grooming/Rehoming Facilities and Circuits Move multiple rider circuits from one carrier facility to the free channels of the same or a different carrier facility. Change the end point of a carrier facility from one port to another compatible port within a single site. Circuit Termination to a Location Provide the ability to create a leased facility which is terminated between a non- inventoried site and a port of a managed logical device. Upgrade/Downgrade Facility Capacity Provide the ability to modify the capacity (signal type) of an existing facility/circuit • Example #1: The signal type for the facility is upgraded from E1 to 4xE1 and the records for all riders will be updated with the new facility information. The system will validate that the capacity of each existing connection is still supported by the new upgraded facility based on their signal type hierarchy. • Example #2: The signal type for the facility is downgraded from STM-48 to STM-16. The system will validate that the used capacity does not exceed the bandwidth of the new down-graded signal type. Libraries Public and Private libraries are available in which standard equipment configurations can be created for reuse. The libraries may hold any level of logical or physical equipment from cards to complete BTS or switch configurations, and may also contain sites, e.g. standard cell site configurations. Items may be copied from the library and created at any valid part of the network hierarchy and then customized as required for the specific installation. Projects The Inventory system project functionality may be used to identify network changes with a specific project during the project duration and control interactions between concurrent projects. The project capability may also be used in conjunction with the report functionality to create project based equipment and/or activity reports. The project also provides the time based network resources management (versioning) functionality which enable the operators to manage their network capacity more efficient. Oracle Communications Unified Inventory Management for Mobile Networks Page 15
  16. 16. Reports Customized reports may be created to provide summaries of information contained in the Inventory system system. For example the following custom reports may be created: • a report that lists all facilities in the network and the percentage of channels that are assigned; • a capacity report identifying all free ports on a switch or other logical device; • a list of all equipment added to a site(s) for a project; • a report of the RF power budget for a particular site and antenna (assuming that all required parameters are available as object attributes). Network Processes Inventory system may be used to support a number of processes that are performed by a mobile communications provider. The following identifies some common processes and briefly describes the key steps in the process and how Inventory system can used to support the required steps. Build New MSC Site When a new MSC is to be built in the network, the following are the general steps required: • Select the location – this is done outside of Inventory system, when the location is determined it may be created in Inventory system • Design the floor plan – the floor plan is typically developed in a CAD system (e.g. AutoCAD), if it is available in a compatible format (e.g. AutoCAD .dwg or .dxf) the floor plan may be displayed as a background in Inventory system and Wall-mounts/frames or racks/bays positioned on it • Design/configure the MSC equipment – Inventory system is used to identify the equipment that is to be installed at the MSC – this may be obtained from standard configurations in the library or built from scratch from the defined parts – this design work includes both physical and logical device • Design connectivity to other MSCs – new facilities (leased or owned) are designed to provide the necessary bandwidth between the new MSC and existing MSCs – circuits are created assigning the facility bandwidth for the required connectivity • Design connectivity to PSTN – new facilities (leased or owned) are designed to provide the required bandwidth from the MSC to one or more local and/or long distance PSTN access points • Order equipment/connectivity – the necessary equipment and facilities are ordered from various suppliers – Inventory system reports may be used to obtain the required equipment lists and facility information • Construct the site/install equipment – equipment layouts, facility connection information etc. that has been created in Inventory system in Oracle Communications Unified Inventory Management for Mobile Networks Page 16
  17. 17. previous steps can be used as input to the equipment installation, configuration and hookup activities • Perform site tests – Inventory system is not involved in testing but specific test results, e.g. signal levels, response times etc., could be maintained in appropriate Inventory system attributes for future reference • Provide as-built information – any changes in the equipment design or configuration, channel assignments etc. that were not installed/configured as designed, must be corrected in Inventory system so that the system model is synchronized with the actual installation • Release for operation – the MSC is released for operation – if a project were used for this process in Inventory system, it can be completed and all equipment will be released from the project and available for use in other projects Build New BTS Sites (Cell Sites) • Select the location – selection of cell site location is generally performed in an RF planning tool as the location must provide the best coverage possible of the surrounding area – after the site is selected, it may be created in Inventory system • Identify the floor plan – working with knowledge of the site that has been selected , a standard cell site configuration can be selected or a custom floor plan created as necessary – if the floor plan is available in a compatible format (e.g. AutoCAD .dwg or .dxf) the floor plan may be displayed as a background in Inventory system and Wall-mounts/frames or racks/bays positioned on it • Select (design/configure) the BTS equipment – based on the site RF and capacity requirements, a standard BTS equipment configuration is selected from the Inventory system library for use – the configuration may be changed after it is copied to the cell site if necessary and additional parameters identified (e.g. frequency information, antenna downtilt and (sector) azimuth, sectors, neighboring frequencies, etc.) – if a new configuration is required, it may be constructed from individual parts or modified standard configurations and copied to the library as a new standard configuration • Design connectivity required to the MSC(s) – a facility providing capacity from the MSC to the BTS is created and circuit(s) created to provide the required capacity • Order/obtain required equipment and connectivity – the necessary equipment and facilities are ordered from various suppliers – Inventory system reports may be used to obtain the required equipment lists and facility information • Construct the site/install equipment – equipment layouts, facility connection information etc. that has been created in Inventory system in previous steps can be used as input to the equipment installation, configuration and hookup activities • Test the site – Inventory system is not involved in testing but specific test results, e.g. signal levels, response times etc., could be maintained in appropriate Inventory system attributes for future reference • Provide as-built information – any changes in the equipment design or configuration, channel assignments etc. that were not installed/configured Oracle Communications Unified Inventory Management for Mobile Networks Page 17
  18. 18. as designed, must be corrected in Inventory system so that the system model is synchronized with the actual installation • Release for operation – the new cell site is released for operation – if a project were used for this process in Inventory system, it can be completed and all equipment will be released from the project and available for use in other projects. Add Capacity to BTS Site • Receive capacity addition requirement – as traffic grows within a mobile network or upgrade from 2G/2.5G to 3G, capacity will needed to be added to specific cell sites that have not reached their full capacity, requests for these additions will come from a network planning traffic analysis group • Review current site configuration – the current equipment configuration at the cell site can be reviewed using Inventory system – for example, the available card slots can be determined, unused rack space, available power, space available for new racks or cabinets, etc., can be determined from the Inventory system physical equipment information - available channels in facilities connecting the BTS to the MSC can be determined from the logical device and facility and circuit information in Inventory system • Design additional equipment as required – when the current configuration is understood, additions to physical equipment can be designed and added to the Inventory system configuration (typically as part of an Inventory system project) • Design additional BTS to MSC capacity as required, assign MSC resources – additional capacity required between the BTS and MSC can be added as necessary using Inventory system – this may be provided by assigning unused channels in existing facilities, upgrading existing facilities or designing new facilities – assignment or addition of resources at the MSC (e.g. switch ports) will also be required to complete the increase of capacity to the BTS • Order/obtain required equipment and connectivity – the necessary equipment and facilities are ordered from various suppliers – Inventory system reports may be used to obtain the required equipment lists and facility information for the expansion project • Install new equipment and MSC connectivity – equipment layouts, facility connection information etc. that has been created in Inventory system in previous steps can be used as input to the equipment installation, configuration and hookup activities • Test site – Inventory system is not involved in testing but specific test results, e.g. signal levels, response times etc., could be maintained in appropriate Inventory system attributes for future reference • Provide as-built information – any changes in the equipment design or configuration, channel assignments etc. that were not installed/configured as designed, must be corrected in Inventory system so that the system model is synchronized with the actual installation • Release for operation – the new cell site is released for operation – if a project were used for this process in Inventory system, it can be completed and all equipment will be released from the project and available for use in other projects Oracle Communications Unified Inventory Management for Mobile Networks Page 18
  19. 19. Service Assurance The processes described in the previous section utilize Inventory system to support the planning and building of the network. The information about the network configuration is also used to support the operation of the network as described in the following examples Fault Identification and Resolution When a fault is detected in the network equipment by the alarm management system, the alarm information may specifically identify the faulty equipment, for example port X on card Y or may be a more general alarm, for example timing source failure for equipment XYZ. In both of these cases, easily accessible information that is available in Inventory system about the exact configuration of the equipment reporting the fault can aid in understanding the nature of the failure and quickly resolving the problem. This capability can be enhanced through a custom integration between Inventory system and the alarm management system. Some types of faults, for example loss of connectivity to a site, may be caused by a number of different problems including equipment failure or communication link failure. In these cases, the network topology and connectivity information provided by Inventory system can prove invaluable in identifying the cause of the problem. If communication to a cell site is lost, Inventory system can be utilized to quickly determine the specific equipment and ports that are used to connect to the site, as well the channels and facilities that carry the circuits to the site. If the facility is leased, Inventory system can also provide the provider’s circuit identifier and contact information. The availability of this information from a single source allows the possible causes of the fault to be quickly identified and steps begun to isolate and repair the problem. Fault Impact Determination In some cases a fault occurs in the network which affects other portions of the network. For example if a facility that carries traffic to more than one cell site fails, all of these cell sites will be affected. The information contained in Inventory system regarding network connectivity can then be useful in determining the impact of the fault and, as described above, in identifying the nature of the fault. In the case of a facility fault, Inventory system can easily show the circuits being carried by the failed facility and the cell sites that are connected by these circuits. If not all of Oracle Communications Unified Inventory Management for Mobile Networks Page 19
  20. 20. Oracle Communications Unified Inventory Management for Mobile Networks Page 20 the connected sites have been affected, this information, along with equipment configurations, etc., is required to determine what is causing the fault. System Users The Inventory system is intended for the following user communities: Network Planning: Equipment Planning Fixed Network Engineering Network Operations: Problem solution/analysis Integration with Other Systems The Inventory system is capable to integrate with external systems. The following external systems are candidates of the integrations but not limited to: • Network alarm system • RF Planning System • Cell Planning tool • Transmission Systems • ERP • Trouble Ticketing • Operations Maintenance Centre CONCLUSION Mobile Service Providers need a unified and accurate network inventory to support the growth of today’s services as well as the creation and growth of mobile services beyond voice. Oracle has vast mobile experience in helping Mobile Service Providers implement an inventory solution that is right for their business and to achieve the following benefits: • Reduce rework • Maximize infrastructure utilization • Reduce leased line costs • Reduce supply chain costs • Maximize skilled resources • Improve operational efficiency • Reduce downtime and maximizing call revenue
  21. 21. Oracle Communications Unified Inventory Management for Mobile Networks April 2007 Author: Product Marketing Oracle Corporation World Headquarters 500 Oracle Parkway Redwood Shores, CA 94065 U.S.A. Worldwide Inquiries: Phone: +1.650.506.7000 Fax: +1.650.506.7200 oracle.com Copyright © 2007, Oracle. All rights reserved. This document is provided for information purposes only and the contents hereof are subject to change without notice. This document is not warranted to be error-free, nor subject to any other warranties or conditions, whether expressed orally or implied in law, including implied warranties and conditions of merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose. We specifically disclaim any liability with respect to this document and no contractual obligations are formed either directly or indirectly by this document. This document may not be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, for any purpose, without our prior written permission. Oracle is a registered trademark of Oracle Corporation and/or its affiliates. Other names may be trademarks of their respective owners.

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