The Second Little Book of Leadership
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  • 1. THE SECONDLITTLEBOOK OFLEADERSHIP A free eBook from Phil Dourado. Pass it on. www.phildourado.com www.theleadershiphub.com
  • 2. If you are online, look out for links in this book as you read it. They will take you to interesting stuff on leadership. If you are not online, just enjoy the book without the links. Phil Dourado (Aha! There’s one...)
  • 3. THE SECOND LITTLE BOOK OF LEADERSHIP WHAT LEADERS DO(in just two words) 3
  • 4. THE SECOND LITTLE BOOK OF LEADERSHIP Create meaningLeadership experts have spent the past decade or so coming slowly (andwith far too many words) to this two-word conclusion about what leaders doin a fast-changing world. 4
  • 5. THE SECOND LITTLE BOOK OF LEADERSHIP How we learn tobe leaders 5
  • 6. THE SECOND LITTLE BOOK OF LEADERSHIPLeadership is viral, in a sense.We learn by ‘emulating’ orcopying those we want to belike, often subconsciously,without realizing we are doingit. If you want people to behavea certain way, don’t tell them todo it. Model the way yourself.Phil Dourado6
  • 7. THE SECOND LITTLE BOOK OF LEADERSHIPTHEY KNOW WHO YOUREALLY ARE! 7
  • 8. THE SECOND LITTLE BOOK OF LEADERSHIP“Who you are speaks so loudly, that I cannot hear what you say.” - EmersonWe tune out what people say if there is a dissonance - a discord - between whatthey say and what they do. So, you actually communicate as a leader by ‘doing’,not by ‘saying’. As Thomas Edison put it, “What you are will show in what you do.” 8
  • 9. THE SECOND LITTLE BOOK OF LEADERSHIP THE GOODLEADER IS… 9
  • 10. THE SECOND LITTLE BOOK OF LEADERSHIP“A good leader is he* whom people revere.An evil leader is he whom people despise.A great leader is he of whom the peoplesay ‘We did it ourselves’ ”- Lao Tsu * (Or ‘she’, of course)A good leader inspires people to have confidence in their leader. A great leader inspirespeople to have confidence in themselves. (That’s usually attributed to Eleanor Roosevelt,but I’m pretty sure it’s originally from Lao Tsu; it’s just a different translation of the abovequote). 10
  • 11. THE SECOND LITTLE BOOK OF LEADERSHIP THE GOODLEADER IS… (Take 2) 11
  • 12. THE SECOND LITTLE BOOK OF LEADERSHIP“A good leader is a person who takes a little morethan their share of the blame and a little less thantheir share of the credit.” - John Maxwell 12
  • 13. THE SECOND LITTLE BOOK OF LEADERSHIP THE LEADER’S FOUR MOSTIMPORTANT WORDS 13
  • 14. THE SECOND LITTLE BOOK OF LEADERSHIP “What do you think?” - Tom Peters, the ‘uber-guru’ of management and leadershipSo, what do I do with these four words?Use them every day. Peters says keep count - he says he does it on a piece of paper thathe keeps in his pocket - of how many times you use ‘What do you think?’ every day. It is,he says, possibly your most powerful and least-used leadership tool.These four words turn leadership from a monolog (you tell) to a dialog (the people youwork with contribute to leadership thinking and decisions). 14
  • 15. THE SECOND LITTLE BOOK OF LEADERSHIPStop takingdecisions Start making things happen 15
  • 16. THE SECOND LITTLE BOOK OF LEADERSHIP‘Too many managers mistake decisions for action.A decision is not the same as action. Use plans,analysis, meetings & presentations to INSPIREdeeds, not as a substitute for action.’ - Stanford Professor Robert Sutton 16
  • 17. THE SECOND LITTLE BOOK OF LEADERSHIP THE SECRET OF HIGHPERFORMANCE 17
  • 18. THE SECOND LITTLE BOOK OF LEADERSHIPAccording to Mihaly Csíkszentmihályi, author of the book Flow: ThePsychology of Optimal Experience, people perform to a higher levelwhen they:1. are faced with achievable challenge2. receive regular feedback3. are completely engaged by the task or overall purposeBy ‘flow’ the author means that state of being ‘in the zone’ thatathletes describe or of work ‘flowing’, with time appearing to fly byand you feel totally engaged in the task or goal. 18
  • 19. THE SECOND LITTLE BOOK OF LEADERSHIP Q: WHAT DOGREAT LEADERS INSPIRE? 19
  • 20. THE SECOND LITTLE BOOK OF LEADERSHIP A: Discretionary effortSteve Nielsen, former director of the FedEx Leadership Institute puts itthis way:“Discretionary effort...is an employee’s desire to go beyond thecollecting of a salary. It is a willingness to be interested and involved inassisting the organization in the accomplishment of corporate goals.” 20
  • 21. THE SECOND LITTLE BOOK OF LEADERSHIPFrom Me to We 21
  • 22. THE SECOND LITTLE BOOK OF LEADERSHIPLeadership is often described as a shift in thinking andfocus from ‘me’ to ‘we’.If leaders fail, it is often because they have failed to makethis shift in focus from producing results yourself to gettingthe best results from others.Take this further?There’s a nice piece on the Harvard Business website, called ‘Moving from ‘me’ to ‘we’. Ittakes about five minutes to read. 22
  • 23. THE SECOND LITTLE BOOK OF LEADERSHIP GREAT LEADERS KISS(Keep It Simple, Stupid) 23
  • 24. THE SECOND LITTLE BOOK OF LEADERSHIP“Great leaders are almost always greatsimplifiers, who can cut through argument,debate, and doubt to offer a solutioneverybody can understand.”- General Colin PowellSimple is clever. Complicated just means you haven’t been clever enough to reduce ‘it’ toits essence. Whatever ‘it’ is. Too many organizations still assume the reverse – the morecomplicated something sounds, the more ‘clever’ it must be. And they are suspiciousof ‘simple’, assuming it means ‘unsophisticated’. These are insecure organizations withinsecure leaders. Phil Dourado 24
  • 25. THE SECOND LITTLE BOOK OF LEADERSHIPSTOP TELLING PEOPLE WHAT TO DO 25
  • 26. THE SECOND LITTLE BOOK OF LEADERSHIPWilliam M. McKnight, founder of 3M:“As our business grows, it becomes increasingly necessary todelegate responsibility and to encourage men and women toexercise their initiative. This requires considerable tolerance.Those men and women to whom we delegate authority andresponsibility, if they are good people, are going to want todo their job in their own way. Mistakes will be made. But if aperson is essentially right, the mistakes he or she makes are not asserious in the long run as the mistakes management will make if itundertakes to tell those in authority exactly how they must do theirjobs. Management that is destructively critical when mistakesare made kills initiative. And it’s essential that we have manypeople with initiative if we are to continue to grow.” 26
  • 27. THE SECOND LITTLE BOOK OF LEADERSHIP SEE THE ‘GREAT’IN PEOPLE 27
  • 28. THE SECOND LITTLE BOOK OF LEADERSHIP“Treat people as if they are what they couldbe, and they will become what they arecapable of being.” - Goethe 28
  • 29. THE SECOND LITTLE BOOK OF LEADERSHIP IT’S NOT A WARFOR TALENT 29
  • 30. THE SECOND LITTLE BOOK OF LEADERSHIP“How do you win? By getting averageplayers to play good, and good players toplay great. That’s how you win.” - Bum Phillips, American football coachEveryone talks about ‘The War for Talent’, from the book of the same name by McKinseyconsultant Ed Michaels, as if there’s a scarce resource out there and you have to attractthe best current performers to win. That’s dead wrong. The best leaders get people whohad previously performed to ‘ordinary’ levels to play a level above. You do that by helpingthem see what they are capable of. 30
  • 31. THE SECOND LITTLE BOOK OF LEADERSHIPTHE FORMULA FOR SUCCESS 31
  • 32. THE SECOND LITTLE BOOK OF LEADERSHIP “My formula for success is: Rise early. Work late. Strike oil.” - Oil magnate J. P. GettyYes, it’s a joke. But, there’s a truth in it about making your own luck. Recent research, byinteresting thinkers like Richard Wiseman, suggests that great leaders can make their ownluck, in effect. As Pasteur said “Luck comes to the prepared mind”. And, as golfer GaryPlayer replied when told he was a lucky golfer, “It’s funny how the more I practice, theluckier I get.” Two interesting articles on luck and leadership. 32
  • 33. LEADERS CREATE THE SECOND LITTLE BOOK OF LEADERSHIPMORE LEADERS,NOT FOLLOWERS LEADERS CREATE MORE LEADERS, NOT FOLLOWERS 33
  • 34. THE SECOND LITTLE BOOK OF LEADERSHIP“A manager asked me how to get a group of janitors to takeresponsibility instead of ducking it. I asked who managesthe supplies, cleaning schedules, keeping within budgets,etc. He said he did. I advised him to cede it all, step bystep to the janitors. Let them set the schedules. Show themhow to do the budgeting. He felt this was not possible withmanual workers. But much of what we have to do today isturn manual workers into knowledge workers. The janitorsnow do the planning AND the doing. The supervisor servesthem. He has become a servant leader. Costs are down,incidentally...Source: My notes from listening to the late, great Stephen R Covey 34
  • 35. THE SECOND LITTLE BOOK OF LEADERSHIPTAKE PEOPLETO THE EDGE 35
  • 36. THE SECOND LITTLE BOOK OF LEADERSHIP “Come to the edge”, he said. They said, “We are afraid.” “Come to the edge”, he said. They came. He pushed them. And they flew. - Christopher Logue(That poem is usually ascribed to Apollinaire, but it was actually Christopher Logue writingabout Apollinaire). Great leaders take people out of their comfort zone and overcometheir fear of stretching beyond what they think they can do. You do that by ‘seeing’ thepotential in people that they can’t see themselves. Walt Disney was great at doing this,apparently. 36
  • 37. THE SECOND LITTLE BOOK OF LEADERSHIP WATCH YOUR MOOD(Because they are WATCHING) 37
  • 38. THE SECOND LITTLE BOOK OF LEADERSHIP“A leader’s mood is infectious. Itcan spread like wildfire through anorganization. You can poison or uplift themood without realizing it.” - Mike Harris, Founding CEO of First Direct, the world’s most popular bank 38
  • 39. THE SECOND LITTLE BOOK OF LEADERSHIP REFUSE TOCOMPETE 39
  • 40. THE SECOND LITTLE BOOK OF LEADERSHIP“We still use old warfare metaphors forbusiness leadership, quoting ancient Chinesegenerals and applying them to business. But‘beat the enemy’ doesn’t work. You need tocompete to be unique, not the best.”Source: My notes from an interview with Harvard Professor Michael Porter. 40
  • 41. THE SECOND LITTLE BOOK OF LEADERSHIP ACT‘AS IF...’ 41
  • 42. THE SECOND LITTLE BOOK OF LEADERSHIP“If you’re not sure what to do, think of aleader you admire, think ‘What wouldRichard Branson/Jack Welch/MotherTheresa (whoever it is) do in this situation?’Then act ‘as if...’ you are that leader.”Source: I learnt that from Simon Woodroffe, founder of YO! Sushi, when we were thinkingof writing a book together. 42
  • 43. THE SECOND LITTLE BOOK OF LEADERSHIP THE NEW RULES OFENGAGEMENT 43
  • 44. THE SECOND LITTLE BOOK OF LEADERSHIPThese are the eight things you need to provide as a leader, toensure people are engaged and agree to be led by you1. Meaningful Work2. Autonomy (job ownership - the ability to take owndecisions)3. Connectedness with Colleagues4. Connectedness with Leader (that’s you)5. Collaboration6. Recognition7. Fairness8. GrowthFrom a study carried out by the Ken Blanchard Group of Companies 44
  • 45. THE SECOND LITTLE BOOK OF LEADERSHIP THE NEWGOLDEN RULE 45
  • 46. THE SECOND LITTLE BOOK OF LEADERSHIPEvery major religion has the Golden Rule at its heart: ‘Do as you would be done by’.Only it’s not quite right. Because it assumes we are all the same, all want the same.The New Golden Rule for leaders is… DO TO OTHERS AS THEY WOULD HAVE YOU DO UNTO THEMDon’t assume other people want to be treated the same way you do. You only know whatthey want if you ask them. Phil Dourado 46
  • 47. THE SECOND LITTLE BOOK OF LEADERSHIP WORLD’S SIMPLESTLEADERSHIP SECRET 47
  • 48. THE SECOND LITTLE BOOK OF LEADERSHIP“The trick is to manage individuals the way that THEY want to bemanaged, rather than the way that YOU’d prefer to be managed.The only way to do this is to ASK.In your first (or next) meeting with each direct report ask:1. How do you prefer to be managed?2. What can I do to help you excel (that I’m not doing at themoment)?3. What types of management annoy you (in particular, what do I do‘to’ you that you’d rather I stop doing)?Source: Geoffrey James 48
  • 49. THE SECOND LITTLE BOOK OF LEADERSHIP EVEN SIMPLER VERSION(to put the New Golden Rule into practice) 49
  • 50. THE SECOND LITTLE BOOK OF LEADERSHIPAsk your direct reports these questions in your regular 1to1 sessions.And/or have this ‘leadership conversation’ regularly with your team inopen team discussion.1. What should I START doing that I don’t do now, to help youdevelop and perform?2. What should I STOP doing as you feel it’s holding you back fromproducing your best work?3. What should I CONTINUE doing in how I manage and lead you,to get the best performance possible from you and your people?Source: Lissy Thornquist, a leader I admire a lot, took the standard ‘Start,Stop, Continue’ continuous improvement questions and applied them to howshe leads, as a framework for regular 1to1s with direct reports. And it worksboth ways; you can get your direct reports to ask you similar ‘What should IStart, Stop, Continue?’ questions in return. 50
  • 51. THE SECOND LITTLE BOOK OF LEADERSHIPTHREE THINGSYOU MUST DO TO LEAD CHANGE 51
  • 52. THE SECOND LITTLE BOOK OF LEADERSHIPEdgar Schein’s Top 3 Success Factors in Leading Change1. What a leader attends to, measures, rewards and controls is the mainfactor affecting culture. (‘Culture’ is ‘the way we do things around here’ - howpeople behave)2. How leaders react to critical incidents. (Like a downturn. Or when thingsare going wrong. Do you or members of your team get defensive, go on theattack, support, blame?)3. Leader role-modelling and coaching. (Put basically, they copy how youbehave. And they will blossom and grow if you coach them. Personally. Andthey will then do the same to their subordinates. So, what you do cascades.‘Top-down’ change isn’t a ‘program’. It’s personal.)Source: I learnt that from my friend Prof Aidan Halligan. Edgar Schein ispossibly the world’s leading expert on workplace culture. The above is fromhis studies into how to change the way people behave at work. 52
  • 53. THE SECOND LITTLE BOOK OF LEADERSHIP Finally...A WORD FROM ALBERT EINSTEIN 53
  • 54. THE SECOND LITTLE BOOK OF LEADERSHIPBreak your habits‘How many people are trapped in theireveryday habits; part numb, part frightened,part indifferent? To have a better life we mustkeep choosing how we are living’.- Albert Einstein.Challenge inertia and your own habits, and the habits within yourorganization that may now be out-dated, to change ‘the way we dothings around here’ for the better. 54
  • 55. THE SECOND LITTLE BOOK OF LEADERSHIP Want more?Buy the book by Phil Dourado Published by Capstone Available through www.amazon.com www.amazon.fr www.amazon.co.uk www.amazon.de 55
  • 56. THE SECOND LITTLE BOOK OFLEADERSHIP IF YOU LIKED THIS, THEN CLICK HERE FOR THE First Little Book Of Leadership www.phildourado.com www.theleadershiphub.com