• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
A2 Media Studies - Music Video Analysis
 

A2 Media Studies - Music Video Analysis

on

  • 648 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
648
Views on SlideShare
645
Embed Views
3

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
3
Comments
0

1 Embed 3

http://aaprap7625.blogspot.co.uk 3

Accessibility

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    A2 Media Studies - Music Video Analysis A2 Media Studies - Music Video Analysis Presentation Transcript

    • Music Video Analysis by Andrew Goodwin Theology
    • Andrew Goodwin: 7 key ideas to identify 1. Music videos demonstrate genre characteristics (e.g. Stage performances in metal videos, dance routines for boy/girl bands) 2. There is a relationship between the lyrics and the visuals (Either illustrative, amplifying or contradicting) 3. There is a relationship between the music and the visuals (Either illustrative, amplifying or contradicting) 4. The demands of the record label will include the need for lots of close-ups of the artist and the artist may develop motifs which recur across their work (e.g. A visual style) 5. There are frequent references to the notion of looking (screens within screens, telescopes, etc) and particularly voyeuristic (sexual) treatment of the female body 6. There is often intertextual references (to films, TV programmes, other music videos, etc) 7. Whether the video is primarily performance-based, narrative-based or concept-based and how element of each is used in it
    • “Thinking of you” Katy Perry “Thinking of You” is a song by American singer and songwriter Katy Perry, taken from her second studio album, One of the Boys (2008). The song is a pop ballad song and features acoustic instruments. Two versions of a music video were released. One was a promotional video which was directed by a friend of hers where she is in a white and dark apartment. The second version was the commercial released version, which received positive reception from music critics.
    • “Music videos demonstrate genre characteristics (e.g. Stage performances in metal videos, dance routines for boy/girl bands)” Goodwin's theory states that each genre has particular characteristics that define its genre. Katy Perry's “Thinking of You” is pop genre and there are a number of factors which contribute to creating a pop music video. A key convention of pop videos is a performance element in the music video, meaning the video is usually either performance-based or, if concept or narrative based, include the artist performing throughout. The “Thinking of You” music video is narrative-based and although Katy Perry is playing a character, clips of her performing the song are interspersed throughout the video, having adopted Goodwin’s theory about videos demonstrating genre characteristics. Another common convention of a pop music video is using fade in and out effects, and quick cuts when editing, such as in “That Girl”, Mcfly. “Thinking of You” begins with a fade in to the first image, an abstract shot of the female character’s shoes. There are a many jump cuts throughout the music video and some match cuts. As the video draws to a close the screen fades out again, following the convention of using fade effects found in pop music videos. I n Fade In Match cut
    • Neutral colour schemes are also popular in pop music videos, and “Thinking of You” follows through. Set in the 1940’s, a decade of pastels and neutrals in terms of fashion, the misé en scene was very subdued and natural. The costumes include dulled shades such as black and brown (in the funeral shots, and in the men’s clothing), but are brightened in the flashbacks with the use of pastels and florals the lead wears, signifying that was a happier time. The setting is picturesque and natural, and the house and outdoors were neutral in colour. The black-and-white effect on the combat shots also remained within the neutral colour scheme.
    • “There is a relationship between the lyrics and the visuals (Either illustrative, amplifying or contradicting)” Katy Perry’s “Thinking of You” is narrative-based, presenting the storyline described in the lyrics. The lyrics describe a couple torn apart by war, showing the female lead attempting to move on with a new lover but not feeling complete: “Cause when I'm with him I am thinking of you”. The story goes on, citing how the female regretted letting the soldier go and ending with wishing he’d come back and take her away: “Oh won't you walk through And bust in the door And take me away”. The lyrics are reflected in the visuals of the music video, as the clip tells the story of a young couple now separated by war. The video features past and present insight into the female’s life, showing her failing attempt at a new relationship and attending of the soldiers funeral, interspersed with flashbacks of the couple before the war, going on dates such as swimming, picnics and dancing. There is a strong relationship between the lyrics and the visuals as the video illustrates the lyrics, showcasing the story . Some literal examples: The video cuts to a panning shot of the female character’s new lover while the line “I guess second best is all I will know” is sung, referring to the fact that she will have to settle for someone who won’t ever really replace her past love. As the artist sings “I am thinking of you”, the footage cuts to a flashback clip of the couple riding a back, symbolising whom she’s thinking of. The line “And bust in the door” is sung at the time the female lead closes the door, creating a link between the lyrics and visuals, and amplifying the tragic nature of the video; As she’s wishing for the soldier to return home, she’s closing the door to attend his funeral.
    • “There is a relationship between the music and the visuals (Either illustrative, amplifying or contradicting)” There is a strong relationship between the music and the visuals in “Thinking of You” shown through the order and timing of the cuts according to the beat of the track. The cuts are smooth and run evenly, without becoming jumpy or unnatural, and guided by the outlining, consistent beat of the song. 0:21 0:27 0:28 Marking out where the first jump cuts are made in the video 0:31 0:24 There are a range of close-ups of the artist singing the song, showing the relationship between the music and the visuals. This establishes Katy Perry as the artist but also establishes both her roles as the female lead separated from her lover by war, and the singer of the track. This works to promote Perry as multi-talented: both a singer and an actress, and fans respond to this showcasing of artist’s abilities. Close-ups highlight Katy Perry singing
    • “The demands of the record label will include the need for lots of close-ups of the artist and the artist may develop motifs which recur across their work (e.g. A visual style)” There are many close-ups of the artist performing the song throughout “Thinking of You”. This brings the audience closer to the artist and establishes the artists role in the music video. Close-ups are also used not only to show emotions, but to reflect the words of the song with the movement of the lips of the artist. Katy Perry doesn’t seem to have a particular motif or style when singing, but their is emphasis on her lips in extreme close-ups and close-ups, and there is usually some activity happening when she is singing e.g. Putting on lipstick, looking out of the window, etc. In “Thinking of You” she doesn’t directly look into the lens either, possibly intending a natural look, which could be categorised as a visual style as well.
    • “There are frequent references to the notion of looking (screens within screens, telescopes, etc) and particularly voyeuristic (sexual) treatment of the female body” Within the music video, there are frequent notions of looking made by the “new lover” character within the music video, encouraging the audience to indulge in similar behaviour. The character looks and watches the artists in a very predatory and sensual way, and this sexualises the artist and makes her seem more appealing to the viewers. The misé en scene, regarding costume, is very scant, with Katy Perry’s outfits in the present, aside from in the last funeral shots, consisting of 1940’s underwear including garter belt and hold-ups, and a sheer dressing gown. This could be technique used to portray Perry as sexually desirable, which would popularise her as an artist for male viewers in particular, but perhaps also as elegant and classy. Although in a very risqué costume, the camera is voyeuristic on a moderate level, with the focal points of its close-ups being Perry’s lips and eyes, rather than her breasts, legs and bottom. This could be due to the tragic and emotional nature of the track and the music video needs to mirror that in its approach, and so despite Perry’s near-bare appearance, the filming technique and style creates an impression of elegance and attractive but not promiscuous.
    • There are snippets of footage of Perry’s character and the “new lover” having sex however, they are short and modest, again, rather than making the music video smutty, presenting it as sad and emotive, particularly as its evident the artist’s character isn’t truly interested. The references to looking and sexualised costume and camerawork do appeal to audiences and work to further popularise the video. The artist is marketed as being attractive and appealing and so are naturally easier to watch on film and more pleasing to listen to, like and follow. For example, various YouTube comments have been posted regarding Perry appearance in the video:
    • “There is often intertextual references (to films, TV programmes, other music videos, etc)” The plot is the key intertextual reference as the soldier going off to war and leaving behind a girlfriend or wife is a popular plot in a lot of media. “Dear John” is a key example of young love being torn apart by war, and relates heavily in plot to the music video, although they sport different endings. The reference to “Dear John” in the music video could have been a deliberate choice by the producers to appeal the video to Katy Perry’s fan base. “Dear John” is a romance film starring heartthrob Channing Tatum, and targeted at teenage and young-adult females, (roughly the same audience Perry targets for her music), and this would popularise the music video to the audience she aims at through the similarities of the film and video. These are some of the shots “Dear John” and “Thinking of You” have in common: “New Lover” *Both male leads are in the army and we see shots of them in action*
    • A comment by these fans on the music video on YouTube.com supports this idea that by intertextually relating aspects of the music video to other sources of media popular with your fanbase, it will grow in popularity and appeal the video further. “The Notebook” and “The Great Gatsby” were both romantic-dramas which were targeted at a similar audience that Perry’s music is: young females, 12-25.
    • “Whether the video is primarily performance-based, narrative-based or concept-based and how elements of each is used in it” “Thinking of You“ is primarily narrative based because the footage follows a storyline; a soldier and his girl torn apart by war, her attempt at replacing him but failing and the revealing of his death in her preparation for his funeral, interspersed with flashback shots of their time together pre-war. Basic plotline: However, the music video is also partly performance-based because it features the artist, Katy Perry, singing the snippets of the song in character, and acting as the female lead in the video.
    • “Young and Beautiful” Lana Del Rey “Young and Beautiful” a song recorded by American singersongwriter Lana Del Rey. Released on 23 April 2013, it was the first single from The Great Gatsby: Music from Baz Luhrmann's Film soundtrack. Contemporary music critics lauded the single, calling it "haunting" and "sombre". Lyrically, "Young and Beautiful" follows a young lover's apprehension about aging. The genre of the song is indie rock and Del Rey's dreamy vocals are accompanied by sedated strings and canned percussion shown in the video. The music video was released on 10th May, 2013. Flanked by a full-string orchestra, Del Rey sings in 1920s art deco fashion. She is shown singing the song in a dark room with glittery diamond-tears on her cheek which look like tattoos.
    • “Music videos demonstrate genre characteristics (e.g. Stage performances in metal videos, dance routines for boy/girl bands)” “Young and Beautiful”, when compared to many of Del Rey’s past music videos, is a clear conformer to her usual style. She often has dark, fuzzy effects added to the footage, to give a vintage, dated feel to the clip, seen in videos such as “Born to Die”, “Summertime Sadness” and “Ride”. The coloured lights spots on the orchestra in “Young and Beautiful” can also be seen in “Summertime Sadness” where, in a general dull-colour themed music appears strips or spots of the primary colours, a motif of some of Del Rey’s work. “Young and Beautiful” “Ride” “Summertime Sadness” Del Rey’s music videos also feature a range of close-ups on her face singing the song and are almost always performance-based mainly, with perhaps a slight narrative-spin. This could be to create a closer relationship between the artist and audience and encourage a larger following and popularity. A common characteristic of alternative rock music videos is using light and dark colour to create a dated and natural ‘look’ and atmosphere. Del Rey’s “Young and Beautiful” follows this convention, using lighting to black-out the details of Del Rey’s figure but also to highlight her curvy, sensual outline, portraying her as appealing and attractive. The video also works within a very dull and dark colour scheme, reds, blues and purples decorating the shots of orchestra and the close-ups using dark browns, creams and black to portray Del Rey. However, “Young and Beautiful” challenges a convention of both Alternative Rock and her own style music videos by not including any shots of nature or panning shots of scenery, in favour of a 1920’s performance-themed piece.
    • “There is a relationship between the lyrics and the visuals (Either illustrative, amplifying or contradicting)” Due to “Young and Beautiful” being a largely performance-based music video, the lyrics have very little relation to the visuals, particularly in terms of illustrating them which is more common in narrative-based videos. The chorus of the song, “Will you still love me...” is rhetorical and personal, sung by the artist referring to the artist. While the chorus is sung, the footage cuts to close-ups of the artist, creating a link between the artist’s personal question and the visual of the artist’s face. There is some relation to the lyrics in the visuals. When Del Rey begins the verse featuring “Dear Lord, when I get to Heaven”, the footage flickers to an image of the artist standing in a shaft of light, which connotes it. Then, as the line “He’s my sun, he makes me shine” is sung, a circular glow appears around Del Rey’s figure, representing a halo and further drawing a connection between lyrics and visuals. Something could be said for the fact that Del Rey is only ever viewed solely in the footage. Although backed up by an orchestra, she is never within the same frame and this sense of isolation could relate to the theme of the lyrics: a fear of going old alone.
    • “There is a relationship between the music and the visuals (Either illustrative, amplifying or contradicting)” The relationship between the music and the visuals in “Young and Beautiful” is one of amplifying. The music has a very melancholic and dreary tone which is mirrored and highlighted through the misty, slightly fuzzy effect and dark lighting the footage features. Throughout the song, there is a heavy drum beat hit at the beginning of every chorus which is reflected in the cut from a close-up to Del Rey to the orchestra playing and the conductor directing a rise in dynamics. The jump cuts between shots are timed according to the tempo and beats of “Young and Beautiful”. There is also an illustrative aspect to the relationship between music and visuals in this music video; the shots of the orchestra playing is illustrating the music heard in the on the track. “The demands of the record label will include the need for lots of close-ups of the artist and the artist may develop motifs which recur across their work (e.g. A visual style)” The demands of the record label for lots of close-ups is met in “Young and Beautiful”. In the shots of the artist singing the song, there are only ever close-ups with the focus on the focal points of the face such as cheeks, lips and eyes in extra close-ups and close-ups of the full face from a range of angles. There are also some wide shots , full-length but in dark lighting, playing with shadow across Del Rey’s figure so that only her face and lips singing are highlighted. The technique of close-ups develops a close, personal relationship between the audience and the artist, allowing the viewer to feel connected and involved in the music video and song. It also allows the artist to come across as more relatable and personable. Del Rey, although not an obvious visual style, is very melancholic in her performance, with a serious and almost disparaging expression. This gives her a very sophisticated style and suits the melancholic, dreary tone of her voice.
    • “There are frequent references to the notion of looking (screens within screens, telescopes, etc) and particularly voyeuristic (sexual) treatment of the female body” Screen 3 A screen, within a screen, within a screen Screen 1 Screen 2 There is a reference to looking throughout the course of the music video. The action on screen is framed throughout by a black border, portraying the footage in a screen within a screen and proving this rule in Goodwin’s theory. Regarding the voyeuristic treatment of the female body, the camera is subtle in the sense that in its perusal of Del Rey’s body, it doesn’t focus on the highly sexualised area of the body e.g. breasts, thighs, bottom. Contrastingly, the camera is blatantly sexual when perusing Del Rey’s figure as a whole. Following the line of her body, the lighting is low-key and creates shadows across her form, focusing the audience’s attention on the clear silhouette of her body, blacking out the rest of the frame. Also, the camera focuses in on the sexualised areas of the face, using an ECU when filming Del Rey’s lips which have been made more prominent by the dark lipstick contrasting with her pale skin, and her eyes which have been similarly highlighted by heavy eye make-up. This is a technique used to popularise the artist to the audience: appealing and attractive singers will gain following from both fans who appreciate her sexually as well as musically.
    • “There is often intertextual references (to films, TV programmes, other music videos, etc)” Del Rey’s “Young and Beautiful” is intertextually related to the 2013 film “The Great Gatsby”. Released on 23 April 2013, it was the first single from the The Great Gatsby: Music from Baz Luhrmann's Film soundtrack. With the lyrics, "Will you still love me when I'm no longer young and beautiful?" Del Rey adds a hint of desperation which parallels the idiosyncrasies faced by the characters in F. Scott Fitzgerald’s classic novel. Del Rey's dreamy vocals are draped over sedated strings and canned percussion, falling in line with Del Rey's retro affectation, fits the atmosphere of the 1920s when the novel is set. The lyrics rotate around the themes of pleasing a lover, nostalgia, and the gloom of aging and change, all of which are explored in the novel “The Great Gatsby”.
    • Regarding misé en scene, Del Rey’s costume, a long dark dress, and wavy dark hair curled along her forehead, as well as her flamboyant glitzy diamond hoop earrings are reminiscent of the 1920’s fashion, relating the video to the decade “The Great Gatsby” was set in. The dark lighting and dated effect edited over the footage gives the music video an old, vintage look, further enhancing a sense of age and time-gone-by to “Young and Beautiful”, which not only refers to the lyrical theme of the song (aging) but also to the sense of loss felt in the novel. Long, dark dresses are a classic 1920’s costume piece and relates the music video to the novel intertextually Glitzy, diamante, extravagant jewellery is a traditional aspect of the 1920’s, used in both The Great Gatsby and “Young and Beautiful” music video. Both Del Rey and Mulligan assume similar poses in the image suggesting a further reference to the novel in the music video. Using references to “The Great Gatsby” an award-winning, highprofile film, was a clever marketing strategy used to raise the track and music video’s profile via association. It promoted the music video to the film’s audience as well as Del Rey’s fan base, portrayed Del Rey as classy, elegant 20’s style artist, all characteristics connoted from “The Great Gatsby”.
    • “Whether the video is primarily performance-based, narrative-based or concept-based and how elements of each is used in it” “Young and Beautiful” is strongly performance-based. The basis of the video is shots of Del Rey and the orchestra performing the song, interspersed with a few full-length shots of the artist’s figure and silhouette shots. Major footage of the artist and musicians playing the music is a key convention of performancebased music videos and identifies this video as wholly performance.
    • “You’ll Be Mine” The Pierces "You'll Be Mine" is a single by New York based band The Pierces. It is the first single released from their fourth studio album You & I. It was released on March 6, 2011 as a Digital download and on 7 March 2011 on CD. The genre is indie pop and is an ideal video to analyse as it is of the same genre as our song we are designing a music video for. As a result, we can research what the generic conventions of indie pop music videos are, use aspects of the music video to inspire own and learn what audiences expect from their artists music videos.
    • “Music videos demonstrate genre characteristics (e.g. Stage performances in metal videos, dance routines for boy/girl bands)” A key genre characteristic of Indie-Pop music videos is the basis of the video having the performance element running alongside the narrative element. However, “You'll Be Mine” challenges this conventions the video is purely performance, the footage not illustrating the lyrics or meaning, which could be in relation to the fact that the song doesn’t as such tell a story, unlike Katy Perry’s “Thinking Of You”. Many of the Indie-Pop music videos use a filter over the top of clips or the entire video to give a certain idea to the viewer e.g. memory, age to the video, or showing the footage to be positive or negative. “You’ll Be Mine” conforms to this generic convention, a colourwash filters the entire music video. The effect of the colourwash, mirrored shots within one frame and the dual footage effect, as well as altering the opacity to merge shots over one another, gives a very magical, supernatural atmosphere to the music video, which relates to the witchy, spell-casting lyrics the song features “Prick your finger on a spinning wheel But don't make a sound Drop of blood”. “You’ll Be Mine” adopts the Indie-Pop generic convention of including many shots of nature or panning shots of scenery, the video having been shot in a field. This not only relates the song to the genre more clearly, but adds to the theme of a magical, fairy-tale place the lyrics connote. The video, as a result is very aesthetically, having a beautiful setting and ethereal feel to it.
    • “There is a relationship between the lyrics and the visuals (Either illustrative, amplifying or contradicting)” The relationship between the lyrics and the visuals is illustrative. In the first verse, there are numerous references to nature “grass”, “leaves”, “birds” and “sky”, all of which are filmed and shown in the abstract filler shots interspersed between the performance shots. The music video features the two artists in a field or forest, and there are a range of nature shots throughout the video, the idea of nature coming through in the lyrics as well as in the visuals. We could bring a blanket for the grass We could watch the black birds cross the skies We could count the leaves left on the trees The line “Prick your finger on a spinning wheel But don't make a sound Drop of blood” connotes witchcraft and fairy tales, magic. This is amplified in the shots of the group of girls playing with glass spheres or crystal balls, the candles, dancing and lanterns etc., all giving a sense of the occult or at least supernatural element to the footage. The colourwash effect put over the whole video give it a very mystical feel, reflecting the lyrics. It could be argued that the relationship between the lyrics and the visuals in “You’ll Be Mine” is a contradictory. The chorus and title “You’ll Be Mine” and the repetition of the word “We” at the beginning of the verse sentences e.g. “We could count the teardrop in our eyes”, connotes surety and the idea of a couple getting together, however, the music video visuals are of women alone, or in a big group. There are no references to or shots of the men they might be romantically interested in, and the longing expressions of the artists juxtapose the certain tone of the lyrics.
    • “There is a relationship between the music and the visuals (Either illustrative, amplifying or contradicting)” There is a subtle amplifying relationship between the music and the visuals in this music video. There aren’t any obvious points of reference however, there are small relating aspects which refer to this statement. The soft beat of the sound of the wooden drum relates to the nature, floral setting of the video. The mellow, upbeat but calm tone of the music relates to the sure, but longing message of the lyrics “You’ll Be Mine” and the similarly yearning expression of the artists. The strong, constant beat of the track running throughout the video is used to time cuts to different scenes, e.g. cuts to different clips occur on the beat. At the beginning of the music video, between 0:03-0:07, there is a soft, running introduction, almost as if made by steel drums, and while this happens, there are visuals of a girl spinning around, which amplifies the music. “The demands of the record label will include the need for lots of close-ups of the artist and the artist may develop motifs which recur across their work (e.g. A visual style)” The music video does include close-ups of the artists singing, both independently and together, however, there aren’t many ECUs nor frequent close-ups like on the scale seen in Katy Perry's “Thinking Of You”, and Lana Del Rey’s “Young and Beautiful”. There are a range of performance shots of the duet signing, ranging in closeness. There isn’t a particular style developed or a motif occurring frequently across The Pierces work except for the fact that when performing the song, there is constant eye contact with the camera, like they are singing into it. Catherine (the blonde singer) is featured singing a little more often, suggesting she’s the lead singer in the duet.
    • “There are frequent references to the notion of looking (screens within screens, telescopes, etc) and particularly voyeuristic (sexual) treatment of the female body” The lack of ECUs or loads of close-ups in the music video lessen the notion of looking. However, the constant, piercing eye contact the artists keep with the camera heighten the sense of looking and be looked at. There isn’t much in terms of treating the female body in this music video sexually, much like with “Thinking Of You” and “Young and Beautiful”. The camera uses some close-ups but doesn’t focus in on the sexualised areas of the body and more focuses on silhouette and the figure, portraying the duet as ethereal and beautiful, rather than as sexual object. The effect is that the music video seems more sophisticated, and about the song and the aesthetic beauty of the footage, setting and artists, rather than about their individual sexual appeal. In music videos dominated by close-ups of the artists’ breasts, thighs, bottom and lips, the meaning of the song, I feel, is lost. “There is often intertextual references (to films, TV programmes, other music videos, etc)” The natural setting and magic fairy tale kind of atmosphere present in the music video could be a reference to a range of media platforms e.g. TV Programmes, and music video. The music videos Hothouse’s “78Violet”, Haim’s “Falling” are artistically similar, featuring twirling females, playing in a field and clips of nature interspersing performance shots. The TV programme Skins (Series 4, episode 8, Series 6, episode 7), uses the forest and nature as a getaway haven, a place to escape to and feel safe. Some viewers, also liken the long, white outfits and music to ABBA.
    • “Whether the video is primarily performance-based, narrative-based or concept-based and how elements of each is used in it” The Pierces’ “You’ll Be Mine” is very similar to Del Rey’s “Young and Beautiful” in the sense that it is also powerfully performance-based. The majority of the content of the music video is of both members of the duet singing the song using a variety of shots, from close-ups to fulllength long shots. There is some variation of abstract filler shots of nature, and the background of the set e.g. the field.