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The Role Of Libraries In A Networked World (2008)

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4/17/2008: This presentation was an overview of Pew Internet Project findings about the changing structure of information and communication in the digital age, the role that libraries play in helping …

4/17/2008: This presentation was an overview of Pew Internet Project findings about the changing structure of information and communication in the digital age, the role that libraries play in helping people solve problems, and the broader roles that libraries might fill in people's lives.

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  • Aside from laying out online interaction and behavior... I see absolutely no relationship to libraries. The data is great, but the presentation may as well read 'Online Users of 2010' ...
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  • Title: Beyond Bytes and Books: The role of libraries in a networked world Subject: The internet, cell phones, and other digital technologies have allowed people to have larger social networks, to participate in and learn from larger numbers of groups, to act in new ways to shape their world, and to gather, asses and act on information from all kinds from all kinds of “media.” This marks a major shift in the social and civic lives of Americans that has big implications for libraries as they think about serving their communities. Rainie will explore all these changes through the lens of the surveys and research of the Pew Internet & American Life Project.
  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2rDp8yHhGHU&search=wayne
  • http://community.livejournal.com/unsent_letters/
  • http://profile.myspace.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=user.viewProfile&friendID=54465471
  • http://www.ipcmclean.org/
  • More than half of internet users belong to listservs and other email groups organized around a topic, organization, or group. More than a third of internet users customize information at Web sites 25% get e-newsletters
  • `
  • Members of this group use their extensive suite of technology tools to do an enormous range of things online, on the go, and with their cell phones. With their deep and varied tech appetites, they are called the Omnivores . You might see them watching video on an iPod. They might talk about their video games or their participation in virtual worlds the way their parents talked about their favorite TV episode a generation ago. Much of this chatter will take place via instant messages, texting on a cell phone, or on personal blogs. Omnivores are Web 2.0 devotees. They are highly engaged with video online and digital content. Between blogging, maintaining their Web pages, remixing digital content, or posting their creations to their websites, they are creative participants in cyberspace. When the next popular user-generated fashion comes along, Omnivores are likely to test-drive it. One might even invent it. Members of this group are confident in their ability to manage the flow of electronic information that is all around them. Indeed, ICTs are at the center of how they connect to their friends and express themselves to the world around them. Most Omnivores are in their twenties and nearly all have high-speed connections available at home or work.
  • The typical member of the Connectors group first went online about nine years ago. They were part of the big wave of internet adoption in the late 1990s adoption. This mostly female group of thirtysomethings is heavily reliant on the cell phone; they especially like the way the cell phone and other information technologies make them more available to others. They often use the wireless networks to go online. The Connectors’ collection of information technology is used for a mix of one-to-one and one-to-many communication. They very much like how ICTs keep them in touch with family and friends, but they are also twice as likely as the average to blog or have a Web page. They like how ICTs let them work in community groups to which they belong, and overall they find their information gadgets a boon to personal productivity. It is possible that Connectors would do more with user-generated content if they had more technological self-confidence. They suspect their gadgets could do more for them, and some say they need help in getting new technology to function properly.
  • For Lackluster Veterans , the thrill of information technology is gone – if it was ever there to begin with. And they have had ample time to come to this conclusion. The members of this fortyish group of mostly men came online in the mid-1990s, and they have acquired the laptop computer and broadband connection along the way to becoming frequent users of the internet. But their habits of connectivity seem to have the weight of necessity more than a full-hearted embrace of information technology’s affordances. Only a few Lackluster Veterans like how information technology makes them more available to others, and not many think it adds to their personal productivity. Doing without email or a cell phone would be hard for only some of these men. All in all, Lackluster Veterans seem content with surfing the Web or emailing family and friends, but they do not show great inclination to stretch their technology habits to self-expression or mobile media.
  • Productivity Enhancers see information technology as a way to give them an edge in their professional and personal lives. They are frequent users of the internet – especially at work – and they link use of their extensive suite of information devices to personal productivity and workplace effectiveness. It is not all about carrying out tasks for this group, as they greatly value how ICTs help them stay in touch with family and friends and learn new things. Perhaps because Productivity Enhancers are in very busy stages of their lives – in their early 40s, many with kids, nearly all with jobs – they may not have time to participate in many online content creation activities or to try leading edge applications. The blogosphere is generally on the periphery of this group’s habits and it is very unlikely you will find Productivity Enhancers watching a “24” short clip on their cell phone or laptop.
  • This group, whose typical member is in his mid-thirties, has been online for a relatively short amount of time, just more than half as long as prior groups. Although most use the internet and many focus on its entertainment dimensions, Mobile Centrics are much more wedded to their cell phones. Mobile Centrics have cell phones that are jam-packed with functionality -- such as video capability and games -- and they are very likely to use their cell phones for texting. Information technology, for this group, is an avenue for staying in touch with others and adding to their “old media” entertainment experiences. They are among the heaviest users of cell phones for most of their phone calling. Although they like how technology connects them to others, Mobile Centrics generally do not associate information technology with greater efficacy in their lives. They do not see ICTs as giving them any more control over their lives, nor do they link ICTs with greater levels of personal productivity. The group includes a high share of African-Americans.
  • The Connected but Hassled bought a ticket to the information revolution a bit later (around 1999) than members of more tech-oriented groups such as the Connectors or Productivity Enhancers. The ride must have seemed interesting enough so that members of this group kept buying more tickets, such as cell phones, home high-speed connections, and digital cameras. For whatever reason, however, the Connected but Hassled do not much appreciate the information and communications assets they have acquired. Many of them say they suffer from information overload, and very few find the extra availability ICTs offer to be a good thing. The typical member of this female-dominated group is in her late forties and not many would miss it if they had to go without the internet, email, or their cell phone.
  • This group, 8% of the population, comes in below average in internet and cell phone adoption. They have reliable, if not ardent, online surfing habits. Although Inexperienced Experimenters do not exhibit strong tendencies to try out the participatory Web, about one in five has posted a comment to a web site, shared a comment somewhere online, or one of the other activities pertaining to user-generated content. Some will even share a digital photo over email or download music. The willingness among some Inexperienced Experimenters to try new things online goes along with their openness to technology. Most like it that technology makes them more available to others, and most believe ICTs make them more productive in carrying out everyday tasks. An Inexperienced Experimenter is likely to be a woman and entering her fifties; she is likely to have been online for a relatively short amount of time – about five years – and to have an income just above the average.
  • This group came to the internet late. The typical online user in this group has been online for five years, even though she is in her mid-fifties. Light but Satisfied users do not go online everyday, simply because technology is at the outer edge of how they manage their lives. The vast majority has cell phones, but their phones are not feature-rich. They rarely use their cell phones for text messaging. Some Light but Satisfied users consider ICTs a good thing for social and informational purposes, but they aren’t especially pleased that their gadgets make them more available to others. They say they would not find it too hard to do without their internet connections. Whereas most tech-oriented groups could sooner do without their landline phone than their cell phones, the reverse is true for Satisfied but Light users.
  • Although everyone in this group has a cell phone or internet access, they are least likely to be users of both technologies. Even among those who have access, this group of Indifferents does not often use the internet and it sticks to the basics on cell phones that have comparatively little functionality. Their low rate of home broadband access is no doubt a barrier to active use of the internet. Technology is closer to the periphery of their lives than is the case for Satisfied but Light users. Few Indifferents link information technology to enhancing personal productivity, pursuing hobbies, or sharing their ideas with others. This group of mostly men in their late forties just does not see ICTs making much of a difference for them.
  • Some 15% of Americans have neither a cell phone nor internet access. They tend to be in their mid-60s, nearly three-fifths are women, and they have low levels of income and education. Although a few have computers or digital cameras, these items seem to be about moving digital information within the household – for example, using the computer to display digital photos that they take or others physically bring into the house.
  • Allen Renear , Graduate School of Library and Information Science University of Illinois at Urbana - Champaign
  • Offer your expertise in new literacies. Much material from this slide comes from Pam Berger http://www.infosearcher.com/ Graphic literacy , Navigation, Context, Skepticism, Focus, Ethical Behavior --t hese have become survival skills for learners to participate in knowledge-construction tasks in a digital environment. Graphic literacy – thinking visually : The nature of literacy is changing; it includes not only text but also symbols and visual images or icons that make up graphic user interfaces. Students need to learn the language of screen literacy and to develop the skills to understand the instructions and messages represented visually.  Navigation – developing a sense of Internet geography: The hypertext environment of the Internet is a powerful learning environment; however, users are faced with many challenges.  Hypertext environments provide students with a high degree of freedom in navigating through large amounts of information, but also present them with problems arising from the need to construct knowledge from large quantities of independent pieces of information reached in a non-linear, unorganized manner. Transition from linear to non-linear environments requires users to develop thinking skills that are characterized by a good sense of multimedia spatial orientation, simply stated -- not getting lost when you click from one website or page to another. Students, ages 7 to 12, who worked on the International Children’s Digital Library development team, for example, understood this issue and initiated the design of a screen reader, the Spiral Reader, so that users would have a “sense of place” or visual context while reading a digital book. Context – seeing the connections : A hypermedia environment encourages non-linear exploration, but unfortunately it does not provide a context to critically investigate a subject. Unlike a printed book that contains a table of contents and an index to assist the reader to delve deeper and understand the relationships and connections among sub-topics, Internet resources are viewed out of context. Students often collect lots of independent pieces of information with no depth to their inquiry. Hypermedia environment encourage broad accumulation of information, but not necessarily deep exploration. Sometimes students link only to resources from one website which might produce the quantity of information needed but could also present a narrow, biased glimpse of a subject. Focus – practicing reflection and deep thinking: A digital environment offers a multitude of distractions and tends to fragment our attention. When a task is difficult, we naturally tend to succumb to these distractions, and when sitting at a computer they are not only easily available but enticing — checking email, Googling, iTunes, instant messaging, etc. Deep reading and reflection are necessary for associative thinking, synthesis and understanding. We need to address these issues and find remedies to guide students to focus and think deeply. Skepticism – learning to evaluate information : With the rapid growth of information, the ability of users to evaluate and use information competently is a key issue in developing digitally literate students. The need to evaluate information is not unique to the digital age; it has always been part of the information literacy curriculum. Not surprisingly, the criteria needed to determine the quality and credibility of online information are identical to those required for evaluating information found in other forms of communications: accuracy, authority, objectivity, currency, relevance, and coverage of scope. However, it takes on urgency because of the sheer quantity of information produced daily and the lack of safeguards that publishing houses provide with print media. Students need to develop a sense of skepticism and hone their judgment skills when locating Web-based information to detect erroneous, irrelevant or biased information. Ethical behavior – understanding the rules of cyberspace:  Students need to know how to use technology responsibly and thoughtfully, as well as, how to protect their safety, security, and privacy online. Ethics and citizenship in cyberspace includes respect for digital property; an understanding of the special privileges and responsibilities of online communication; and the critical thinking and decision making skills to manage one’s actions in cyberspace
  • Offer your expertise in new literacies. Much material from this slide comes from Pam Berger http://www.infosearcher.com/ Graphic literacy , Navigation, Context, Skepticism, Focus, Ethical Behavior --t hese have become survival skills for learners to participate in knowledge-construction tasks in a digital environment. Graphic literacy – thinking visually : The nature of literacy is changing; it includes not only text but also symbols and visual images or icons that make up graphic user interfaces. Students need to learn the language of screen literacy and to develop the skills to understand the instructions and messages represented visually.  Navigation – developing a sense of Internet geography: The hypertext environment of the Internet is a powerful learning environment; however, users are faced with many challenges.  Hypertext environments provide students with a high degree of freedom in navigating through large amounts of information, but also present them with problems arising from the need to construct knowledge from large quantities of independent pieces of information reached in a non-linear, unorganized manner. Transition from linear to non-linear environments requires users to develop thinking skills that are characterized by a good sense of multimedia spatial orientation, simply stated -- not getting lost when you click from one website or page to another. Students, ages 7 to 12, who worked on the International Children’s Digital Library development team, for example, understood this issue and initiated the design of a screen reader, the Spiral Reader, so that users would have a “sense of place” or visual context while reading a digital book. Context – seeing the connections : A hypermedia environment encourages non-linear exploration, but unfortunately it does not provide a context to critically investigate a subject. Unlike a printed book that contains a table of contents and an index to assist the reader to delve deeper and understand the relationships and connections among sub-topics, Internet resources are viewed out of context. Students often collect lots of independent pieces of information with no depth to their inquiry. Hypermedia environment encourage broad accumulation of information, but not necessarily deep exploration. Sometimes students link only to resources from one website which might produce the quantity of information needed but could also present a narrow, biased glimpse of a subject. Focus – practicing reflection and deep thinking: A digital environment offers a multitude of distractions and tends to fragment our attention. When a task is difficult, we naturally tend to succumb to these distractions, and when sitting at a computer they are not only easily available but enticing — checking email, Googling, iTunes, instant messaging, etc. Deep reading and reflection are necessary for associative thinking, synthesis and understanding. We need to address these issues and find remedies to guide students to focus and think deeply. Skepticism – learning to evaluate information : With the rapid growth of information, the ability of users to evaluate and use information competently is a key issue in developing digitally literate students. The need to evaluate information is not unique to the digital age; it has always been part of the information literacy curriculum. Not surprisingly, the criteria needed to determine the quality and credibility of online information are identical to those required for evaluating information found in other forms of communications: accuracy, authority, objectivity, currency, relevance, and coverage of scope. However, it takes on urgency because of the sheer quantity of information produced daily and the lack of safeguards that publishing houses provide with print media. Students need to develop a sense of skepticism and hone their judgment skills when locating Web-based information to detect erroneous, irrelevant or biased information. Ethical behavior – understanding the rules of cyberspace:  Students need to know how to use technology responsibly and thoughtfully, as well as, how to protect their safety, security, and privacy online. Ethics and citizenship in cyberspace includes respect for digital property; an understanding of the special privileges and responsibilities of online communication; and the critical thinking and decision making skills to manage one’s actions in cyberspace
  • Transcript

    • 1. The role of libraries in a networked world Lee Rainie – Director Pew Internet Project Texas Library Association April 17, 2008
    • 2.
      • Eight hallmarks of
      • the new digital ecosystem
    • 3. Hallmark 1
      • Media and gadgets are ubiquitous parts of everyday life
    • 4. Home media ecology - 1975
      • Product Route to home Display Local storage
      • TV stations phone TV Cassette/ 8-track
      • broadcast TV radio
      • broadcast radio stereo Vinyl album
      • News mail
      • Advertising newspaper delivery phone
      • paper
      • Radio Stations non-electronic
      Tom Wolzien, Sanford C. Bernstein & Co
    • 5. Home media ecology – now
      • Product Route to home Display Local storage
      • cable TiVo (PVR) VCR
      • TV stations DSL TV
      • Info wireless/phone radio DVD
      • “ Daily me” broadcast TV PC Web-based storage
      • content iPod /MP3 server/ TiVo (PVR)
      • Cable Nets broadcast radio stereo PC
      • Web sites satellite monitor web storage
      • Local news mail headphones CD/CD-ROM
      • Content from express delivery pager
      • individuals iPod / storage portable gamer MP3 player / iPod
      • Peer-to-peer subcarriers / WIFI cell phone pagers - PDAs
      • Advertising newspaper delivery phone cable box
      • Radio stations camcorder/camera PDA/Palm game console
      • game console paper
      • Satellite radio non-electronic storage sticks/disks
      Adapted from Tom Wolzien, Sanford C. Bernstein & Co
    • 6. Hallmark 2
      • The internet, especially broadband connectivity, is at the center of the revolution
    • 7. Internet and broadband adoption 1995-2007 Internet users Broadband at home
    • 8. Hallmark 3
      • People can enjoy media, gather information, and carry on communication anywhere. Wirelessness is its own adventure.
    • 9. Wireless connectivity 2004-2007
    • 10. Mobile devices – college student ownership
      • 88% of college students own cell phones
      • 81% own digital cameras
      • 63 own MP3 players
      • 55% own video cameras
      • 55% own laptops
      • 27% of college students own a PDA or Blackberry
      • ----
      • 77% of college students play games online
    • 11. Hallmark 4
      • Ordinary citizens have a chance to be publishers, movie makers, artists, song creators, and story tellers
    • 12.
      • 62% of young adult internet users have uploaded photos to the internet
      • ----
      • 34% of all users have done this
      Content creation
    • 13.
      • 58% of online teens have created their own profile on a social network site like MySpace or Facebook
      • ----
      • 33% of online adults have such profiles
      Content creation
    • 14.
      • 39% of online teens share their own creations online, such as artwork, photos, stories, or videos
      • ----
      • 21% of online adults have done this
      Content creation
    • 15.
      • 33% of college students keep blogs and regularly post
      • ----
      • 12% of online adults have a blog
      Content creation
    • 16.
      • 28% of young adult internet users have uploaded videos to the web
      • ----
      • 14% of all adult internet users have done this
      Content creation
    • 17.
      • 26% of online teens report keeping their own personal webpage
      • ----
      • 14% of online adults have their own page
      Content creation
    • 18.
      • 26% of young adults have created or worked on webpages or blogs for others, including those for groups they belong to, friends or school assignments
      • ----
      • 13% of online adults do this
      Content creation
    • 19. Content creation 20% of online young adults say they remix content they find online into their own artistic creations ---- 11% of online adults have done this
    • 20.
      • 19% of online young adults have created an avatar that interacts with others online
      • ----
      • 6% of all adult internet users have done this
      Content creation
    • 21.
      • 15% of young adult internet users have uploaded videos to the web
      • ----
      • 8% of all adult internet users have done this
      Content creation
    • 22. Hallmark 5
      • All those content creators have an audience.
    • 23.
      • 55% of young adult internet users use video-sharing sites
      • ---
      • 33% of all adults go to such sites
      Accessing new information content
    • 24.
      • 54% of college students have read blogs
      • ---
      • 36% of all adults do that
      Accessing new information content
    • 25.
      • 44% of young adult internet users seek information at Wikipedia sites
      • ---
      • 36% of all adults use them
      Accessing new information content
    • 26.
      • 14% of young internet users download podcasts
      • ---
      • 12% of all adults do
      Accessing new information content
    • 27. Hallmark 6
      • Many are sharing what they know and what they feel online and that is building conversations and communities
    • 28.
      • 37% of young adult internet users have rated a person, product, or service online
      • ---
      • 32% of all adults have done so
      Information sharing and evaluation
    • 29.
      • 34% of online young adults have tagged online content
      • ---
      • 28% of all adults have done that
      Information sharing and evaluation
    • 30.
      • 25% of younger internet users have commented on videos
      • They also post comments on blogs and photos
      • ---
      • 13% of all adults have commented on videos
      Information sharing and evaluation
    • 31. Hallmark 7
      • Online Americans are customizing their online experiences thanks to Web 2.0 tools
    • 32.
      • ~ 40% of younger internet users customize news and other information pages; ~ half are on specialty listservs
      Information customization
    • 33.
      • ~ A quarter to a third of younger internet users get RSS feeds
      Information customization
    • 34. Hallmark 8
      • Different people use these technologies in different ways
    • 35. Why a tech-user typology? Information & communications technology Applications
    • 36. PIP’s tech-user typology
      • Assets
        • Internet (and broadband at home)
        • Computer use (laptop & desktop)
        • Cell phones
        • iPods
        • Web cams
        • Video recorders & digital cameras
      • Actions
        • User-generated content
        • Gaming
        • Cell phone applications
      • Attitudes
        • Help me be productive?
        • Give me more control?
        • Information overload?
    • 37. High end – Group 1 OMNIVORES (8% of the population)
      • Data Profile
      • Age: late 20s
      • Gender: Male dominant
      • Race: Diverse
      • Home b-band: 89%
      • Special traits
        • Students
        • Wireless
        • Photo and video freaks
      They have the most information gadgets and services, which they use voraciously to participate in cyberspace and express themselves online and do a range of Web 2.0 activities such as blogging or managing their own Web pages.
    • 38. High end – Group 2 CONNECTORS (7% of the population) Between featured-packed cell phones and frequent online use, they connect to people and manage digital content using ICTs – all with high levels of satisfaction about how ICTs let them work with community groups and pursue hobbies.
      • Data Profile
      • Age: late 30s
      • Gender: Female dominant
      • Race: Diverse (blacks)
      • SES: Upscale
      • Home b-band: 86%
      • Special traits
        • Email fanatics + IM
        • Cell phones
        • Media experiences by other means
        • Suspect their gadgets can do more; sometimes need help
    • 39. High end – Group 3 LACKLUSTER VETERANS (8% of the population) They are frequent users of the internet and less avid about cell phones. They are not thrilled with ICT-enabled connectivity.
      • Data Profile
      • Age: 40ish
      • Gender: Male dominant
      • Race: Diverse, trending white
      • SES: Upscale
      • Home b-band: 77%
      • Special traits
        • Tech is necessary, not exiting
        • Dislike “always on” world
        • Parents (child at home)
        • Trad. channels of chatter and info predominate
    • 40. High end – Group 4 PRODUCTIVITY ENHANCERS (8% of population) They have strongly positive views about how technology lets them keep up with others, do their jobs, and learn new things.
      • Data Profile
      • Age: 40ish
      • Gender: Parity
      • Race: Diverse (Latino)
      • SES: Upscale
      • Home b-band: 71%
      • Special traits
        • Flip side of lackluster vets
        • Love tech for work use
        • Don’t have time or inclination to create or browse for fun
    • 41. Middle end – Group 1 MOBILE CENTRICS (10% of the population) They fully embrace the functionality of their cell phones. They use the internet, but not often, and like how ICTs connect them to others.
      • Data Profile
      • Age: early 30s
      • Gender: Parity
      • Race: Minorities rule
      • SES: Middle income
      • Home b-band: 37%
      • Special traits
        • Phone texters and photo takers
        • Not early adopters
        • More likely to be single
        • Not as many gadgets
    • 42. Middle end – Group 2 CONNECTED BUT HASSLED (10% of population) They have invested in a lot of technology, but they find the connectivity intrusive and information something of a burden.
      • Data Profile
      • Age: mid-40s
      • Gender: Female dominant
      • Race: White
      • SES: Middle income
      • Home b-band: 80%
      • Special traits
        • Go online less frequently
        • Tech is not fun – it’s stressful
        • Experience info overload
    • 43. Low end – Group 1 INEXPERIENCED EXPERIMENTERS (8% of pop.) They occasionally take advantage of interactivity, but if they had more experience, they might do more with ICTs.
      • Data Profile
      • Age: 50ish
      • Gender: Female dominant
      • Race: Diverse
      • SES: Middle income
      • Home b-band: 15%
      • Special traits
        • Less online experience
        • Fewer tech assets
        • Fascinated with tech, and willing to try gadgets with coaching
    • 44. Low end – Group 2 LIGHT BUT SATISFIED (15% of population) They have some technology, but it does not play a central role in their daily lives. They are satisfied with what ICTs do for them.
      • Data Profile
      • Age: mid-50s
      • Gender: Parity
      • Race: Whites
      • SES: Below average
      • Home b-band: 15%
      • Special traits
        • Traditional media occupies time
        • Tech doesn’t do much for them
        • Late adopters
    • 45. Low end – Group 3 INDIFFERENTS (11% of population) Despite having either cell phones or online access, these users use ICTs only intermittently and find connectivity annoying.
      • Data Profile
      • Age: late 40s
      • Gender: Parity
      • Race: Whites
      • SES: Below average
      • Home b-band: 12%
      • Special traits
        • Active tech resistors surrounded by gadgets
        • Time pressed
        • Truthful?
    • 46. Low end – Group 4 OFF THE NETWORK (15% of population) Those with neither cell phones nor internet connectivity tend to be older adults who are content with old media.
      • Data Profile
      • Age: mid-60s+
      • Gender: Female dominant
      • Race: Diverse (blacks)
      • SES: Poorest group
      • Home b-band: 0%
      • Special traits
        • Old media and tech are everything
        • Tech wary or even hostile
    • 47. What all this connectivity does to us
      • It changes our relationship to information
      • It changes our relationship to each other
    • 48. Life changes in 10 important ways
      • Volume of info grows -- “long tail” expands
      • Velocity of info increases – “smart mobs” emerge
      • Venues of intersecting with info and people multiply – place shifting and time shifting occurs… “absent presence” occurs
      • Venturing for info changes – search strategies and search expectations spread in the Google era
    • 49.
      • Vigilance for info transforms – attention is truncated (“continuous partial attention”) and elongated (“deep dives”)
      • Valence (relevance) of info improves – “Daily Me” and “Daily Us” gets made
      • Vetting of info becomes more “social” – credibility tests change as people ping their social networks
      Life changes in 10 important ways – cont.
    • 50.
      • Viewing of info is disaggregated and becomes more “horizontal” (Allen Renear UI-Champaign-Urbana) – new reading strategies emerge as coping mechanisms
      • Voting on and ventilating about info proliferates – tagging, rating, and commenting on material is enabled – collective intelligence emerges
      Life changes in 10 important ways – cont.
    • 51.
      • in V ention of info and the visibility of new creators is enhanced – the read/write, Web 2.0 world is about participation
      Life changes in 10 important ways – cont.
    • 52. What role does this leave for libraries?
      • Libraries can plug into people’s social networks
        • Be a “node” in people’s networks – or “weak tie”
    • 53. Background of research
      • Institute for Museum and Library Services grant
      • UIC partnership
      • Government Printing Office query
      • http://www.pewinternet.org/PPF/r/231/report_display.asp
    • 54. Visited library in the past year
      • 53% of American adults
      42% Matures (62-71) % who visited a public library Gen. (ages) 32% 46% 57% 59% 62% After Work (72+) Leading Boomers (53-61) Trailing Boomers (43-52) Gen X (31-42) Gen Y (18-30)
    • 55. Who turns to libraries for problem solving
      • Young adults (18-29) = 21%
      • Oldest (over 70) = 15%
      • Blacks = 26%
      • Latinos = 22%
      • Lower income (HH <$40,000) = 17%
    • 56. Once they are at the library, they are active AND happy
      • 69% got help from library staff
      • 68% used computers – 38% got one-on-one instruction
      • 58% sought reference materials
      • 42% used newspapers and magazines
    • 57. What role does this leave for libraries?
      • Libraries can plug into people’s social networks
      • They can help teach new literacies
    • 58.
      • Graphic literacy – the language of the screen.
      • Navigation – the transition to non-linear format.
      • Context – the importance of seeing connections.
      • Focus – the value of reflection.
      • Skepticism – the capacity to evaluate
      • Ethical behavior – the will to be responsible
      Librarian blogger Pam Berger’s list http://www.infosearcher.com/
    • 59.
      • Personal literacy – understanding your digital footprints
      Pew Internet’s add-on
    • 60. Thank you!
      • Lee Rainie
      • Director
      • Pew Internet & American Life Project
      • 1615 L Street NW
      • Suite 700
      • Washington, DC 20036
      • [email_address]
      • 202-419-4500