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The new education ecology
The new education ecology
The new education ecology
The new education ecology
The new education ecology
The new education ecology
The new education ecology
The new education ecology
The new education ecology
The new education ecology
The new education ecology
The new education ecology
The new education ecology
The new education ecology
The new education ecology
The new education ecology
The new education ecology
The new education ecology
The new education ecology
The new education ecology
The new education ecology
The new education ecology
The new education ecology
The new education ecology
The new education ecology
The new education ecology
The new education ecology
The new education ecology
The new education ecology
The new education ecology
The new education ecology
The new education ecology
The new education ecology
The new education ecology
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The new education ecology

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: Lee Rainie, Director of the Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project, will discuss the Project’s most recent findings about Americans use the internet and their mobile devices to …

: Lee Rainie, Director of the Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project, will discuss the Project’s most recent findings about Americans use the internet and their mobile devices to learn, share, and create information. He will discuss how the changed media environment is affecting learners’ expectations about the availability of information and the ways in which learning takes place. In this new environment, the traditional boundaries between home and school, teacher and pupil, public and private are breaking down and that is affecting the way learning occurs. Lee will describe how Pew Internet has looked at these subjects and the ways in which schools and families are responding to them.

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  • Title: The New Education Ecology Subject: Lee Rainie, Director of the Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project, will discuss the Project’s most recent findings about Americans use the internet and their mobile devices to learn, share, and create information. He will discuss how the changed media environment is affecting learners’ expectations about the availability of information and the ways in which learning takes place. In this new environment, the traditional boundaries between home and school, teacher and pupil, public and private are breaking down and that is affecting the way learning occurs. Lee will describe how Pew Internet has looked at these subjects and the ways in which schools and families are responding to them.
  • This is the way Pew Internet measures content creation….
  • Transcript

    • 1. The new education ecology Lee Rainie, Director, Pew Internet Project 11.9.11 – Sloan Consortium Orlando Email: [email_address] Twitter: @Lrainie
    • 2. Anti-executive summary <ul><li>Which textbook company stocks to buy or dump? (Who’ll do the e-books thing best?) </li></ul><ul><li>Are students’ attention spans shorter now? </li></ul><ul><li>Are students more narcissistic and more indifferent to privacy? </li></ul><ul><li>“ Bye, Bye Birdie” questions ???? </li></ul>(Or… Questions I cannot answer)
    • 3. Broadband facilitates networked information
    • 4. Social media aids peer-to-peer learning by doing
    • 5. Mobile connectivity alters learning venues and expectations
    • 6. New kinds of learners emerge
    • 7. Digital Revolution 1 Internet (95% teens/78% adults) Broadband at home (82% teens/62% adults)
    • 8. Source: Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project, April 26-May 22, 2011 Tracking Survey. N=2,277 adults 18 and older, including 755 reached via cell phone.
    • 9. Networked creators among internet users <ul><li>65% are social networking site users </li></ul><ul><li>55% share photos </li></ul><ul><li>37% contribute rankings and ratings </li></ul><ul><li>33% create content tags </li></ul><ul><li>30% share personal creations </li></ul><ul><li>26% post comments on sites and blogs </li></ul><ul><li>15% have personal website </li></ul><ul><li>15% are content remixers </li></ul><ul><li>14% are bloggers </li></ul><ul><li>13% use Twitter </li></ul><ul><li>6% location services – 9% allow location awareness from social media – 23% mapping services </li></ul>
    • 10. Broadband facilitates networked information Links and multimedia Self-paced learning Analytics Pervasive media
    • 11. Digital Revolution 2 Social networking – 50% of all adults
    • 12. Source: Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project, April 26-May 22, 2011 Tracking Survey. N=2,277 adults 18 and older, including 755 reached via cell phone.
    • 13. Source: Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project, October 20-November 28, 2010 Social Networking survey.
    • 14. Social media aids peer-to-peer learning by doing Elevates DIY learning in soc.nets Increases the role of social networks in learning Facilitates rise of amateur experts Changes character of soc.nets
    • 15. Digital Revolution 3 Mobile – 77% of teens 327.6 Total U.S. population: 315.5 million
    • 16. 35% of adults own “smartphones”
    • 17. Source: Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project, April 26-May 22, 2011 Tracking Survey. N=2,277 adults 18 and older, including 755 reached via cell phone.
    • 18. Digital devices Millennials (18-34) Gen X (35-46) Younger Boomers (47-56) Older Boomers (57-65) Silent Generation (66-74) G.I. Generation (75+) All adults (18+) Cell phone 94% 92% 86% 80% 69% 1% 84% Laptop computer 71% 67% 56% 46% 34% 16% 57% Desktop computer 52% 64% 62% 55% 49% 33% 55% iPod or MP3 player 69% 57% 36% 24% 10% 5% 44% Game console 63% 63% 38% 19% 8% 3% 42% e-book reader 12% 14% 14% 12% 6% 5% 12% Tablet, like iPad 14% 15% 8% 4% 3% 3% 11%
    • 19. Mobile internet connectors – 63% adults
    • 20. Source: Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project, April 26-May 22, 2011 Tracking Survey. N=2,277 adults 18 and older, including 755 reached via cell phone.
    • 21. Mobile connectivity alters learning venues and expectations New access points to knowledge (AAA) Real-time sharing, just-in-time searching Augmented reality Pervasive, perpetual awareness of soc.nets Attention zones morph
    • 22. <ul><li>In the midst of all this, what’s happening with online learning? </li></ul>
    • 23. Good news % saying more than half of their undergraduate students have taken/will be taking an online class Presidents Predict the Future of Online Learning
    • 24. Not-so-good news In general, do you think a course taken only online provides an equal educational value compared with a course taken in person in a classroom, or not? (%) Public Views on Learning Online vs. in the Classroom
    • 25. College presidents weigh in Generally speaking, do you believe a course taken online provides an equal educational value compared with a course taken in person in a classroom, or not? (%) Presidents’ Views on Learning Online vs. in the Classroom
    • 26. New kinds of learners emerge More self-directed Better arrayed to capture new info More reliant on feedback and response More inclined to collaboration More oriented towards being nodes of production
    • 27. What is the future of learning/knowledge? -- Shana Ratner (1997) “Emerging Issues in Learning Communities” New: Learning as a process Knowledge is objective and certain Old: Learning as transaction Knowledge is subjective and provisional
    • 28. What is the future of learning/knowledge? -- Shana Ratner (1997) “Emerging Issues in Learning Communities” New: Learning as a process Learners receive knowledge Old: Learning as transaction Learners create knowledge
    • 29. What is the future of learning/knowledge? -- Shana Ratner (1997) “Emerging Issues in Learning Communities” New: Learning as a process Knowledge is organized in stable, hierarchical structures that can be treated independently of one another Old: Learning as transaction Knowledge is organized “ecologically”-disciplines are integrative and interactive
    • 30. What is the future of learning/knowledge? -- Shana Ratner (1997) “Emerging Issues in Learning Communities” New: Learning as a process Our “intelligence” is based on our individual abilities Old: Learning as transaction Our “intelligence” is based on our learning communities
    • 31. The future of universities? Agree or disagree? In 2020, higher education will not be much different from the way it is today. While people will be accessing more resources in classrooms through the use of large screens, teleconferencing, and personal wireless smart devices, most universities will mostly require in-person, on-campus attendance of students most of the time at courses featuring traditional lectures. Most universities’ assessment of learning and their requirements for graduation will be about the same as they are now.
    • 32. … . or big change is coming? <ul><li>Agree or disagree? By 2020, higher education will be quite different from the way it is today . There will be mass adoption of teleconferencing and distance learning to leverage expert resources. Significant numbers of learning activities will move to individualized, just-in-time learning approaches. There will be a transition to “hybrid” classes that combine online learning components with less-frequent on-campus, in-person class meetings. Most universities’ assessment of learning will take into account more individually-oriented outcomes and capacities that are relevant to subject mastery. Requirements for graduation will be significantly shifted to customized outcomes. </li></ul>
    • 33. Your map is wrong
    • 34. <ul><li>Thank you! </li></ul><ul><li>Questions? </li></ul>

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