The Mobile Difference
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  • Title: The Mobile Difference Subject: Lee Rainie, Director of the Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project, will discuss the Project’s latest findings about how people use mobile devices, including smartphones and tablet computers (iPads). He will describe how mobile connectivity has changed some of the racial and ethnic composition of the online population and shrunken the digital divide. He will explore how the mobile revolution has combined with the social networking revolution to produce new kinds of learning and sharing environments and how this has changed users’ expectations about the availability of media and information. Further, he will describe how people’s experience of the internet is different when people access it on different sized screens (i.e. small handheld screens vs. large desktop screens). And he will consider how the changing media ecosystem is affecting the way people receive, share, and create information.

The Mobile Difference The Mobile Difference Presentation Transcript

  • The Mobile Difference Educause - Webinar July 14, 2011 Lee Rainie: Director, Pew Internet Project Email: [email_address] Twitter: @Lrainie
    • Portrait of a generation
  • Population
  • Race and ethnicity
  • Male education level
  • Female education level
  • Community type
    • Technology and media
  • Self-definition = technology aptitude
  • Connected college students Source: Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project 2010 tracking surveys. All include landline and cell phone interviews. N for all adults=9,769; n for 18-24 year old non-students=717; n for four-year undergrads=246, n for grad students=112, n for community college students=164.
  • Digital devices Millennials (18-34) Gen X (35-46) Younger Boomers (47-56) Older Boomers (57-65) Silent Generation (66-74) G.I. Generation (75+) All online adults (18+) Cell phone 94% 89% 86% 77% 70% 41% 83% Desktop computer 55% 67% 62% 61% 48% 29% 57% Laptop computer 70% 63% 58% 49% 32% 14% 56% iPod or MP3 player 69% 57% 36% 24% 10% 5% 44% Game console 63% 63% 38% 19% 8% 3% 42% e-Book reader 12% 14% 14% 12% 6% 5% 12% Tablet, like iPad 12% 9% 8% 7% 2% 1% 8%
  • Source: Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project, April 26-May 22, 2011 Tracking Survey. N=2,277 adults 18 and older, including 755 reached via cell phone.
  •  
  • Smartphone activities Millennials/coll students over-index on …
    • Texting use
    • Taking pictures on smartphone
    • Going online using smartphone
    • Downloading apps
    • Email on smartphone
    • Recording video on smartphone
    • Playing music on smartphone
    • Playing games on smartphone
  • Mobile is “conversation/search starter” – mobile users overindex on…
    • Daily use of internet
    • Social networking use
    • Search
    • News consumption (including political use)
    • Health and fitness information
    • Video use
    • E-commerce
  • 25% of smartphone owners use it as primary device to go online All smartphone owners (n=688) 25% Gender Men (n=349) 24 Women (n=339) 26 Age 18-29 (n=177) 42 30-49 (n=256) 21 50+ (n=240) 10 Race/Ethnicity White, non-Hispanic (n=417) 17 Black/Latino(n=206) 38 Household Income Less than $30,000 (n=131) 40 $30,000-$49,999 (n=118) 29 $50,000+ (n=334) 17 Education level High school grad (n=169) 33 Some college (n=171) 27 College grad (n=308) 13
  • Source: Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project, April 26-May 22, 2011 Tracking Survey. N=2,277 adults 18 and older, including 755 reached via cell phone.
  • College students and social networking % of internet users in each group Source: Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project 2010 tracking surveys. All include landline and cell phone interviews. N for all adults=9,769; n for 18-24 year old non-students=717; n for four-year undergrads=246, n for grad students=112, n for community college students=164.
  • Source: Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project, October 20-November 28, 2010 Social Networking survey.
  • Source: Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project, April 26-May 22, 2011 Tracking Survey. N=2,277 adults 18 and older, including 755 reached via cell phone.
  • SNS activities Millennials out perform other gens. on …
    • Logging on daily
    • “ Liking” something/someone multiple times a day
    • Updating status daily
    • Tagging and commenting on photos daily
    • Commenting on others’ status daily
    • Having diverse socio-economic network
  • What does this mean?
    • Social networks are more influential - 1
    Sentries
  • What does this mean? Evaluators Social networks are more influential - 2
  • What does this mean?
    • Social networks are more influential - 3
    Audience = New media are the new neighborhood
  • Will Millennials’ use of tech change as they age? July 9, 2010
  • Will Millennials’ use of tech change as they age? By 2020, members of Gen Y will have grown out of much of their use of social networks and transparency-engendering online tools. As they age and find new commitments, their enthusiasm for widespread information-sharing will abate. 29% experts 28% full sample By 2020, members of Gen Y will continue to disclose personal information to stay connected. Even as they mature, have families, and take on more significant responsibilities, their enthusiasm for widespread information sharing will carry forward. 67% experts 69% full sample
  • Themes
    • Online sharing builds friendships, forms communities and builds reputations – Millennials have seen the benefits and will continue to share online as they grow older
    • New social norms that reward disclosure of private information are already forming, in fact, 20 th century notions of privacy are already morphing
    • New boundaries will be set as people adjust to new realities shaped by social network providers
    • Those who disagreed with the majority mostly said that commitments tied to aging will change Millennials level of sharing – especially the time crunch from work and family
    • Thank you!