Networked Individuals (Tampa)

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Director Lee Rainie describes how the social world of “networked individuals” is different from previous generations and how libraries can plug into the information needs and habits of this new tribe of media users. More at pewinternet.org

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  • Title: How libraries can serve Networked IndividualsSubject: Lee Rainie, Director of the Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project, will discuss the latest research of the Project and preview the themes of his forthcoming book, “Networking: The New Social Operating System.” He will describe how the social world of “networked individuals” is different from previous generations and how libraries can plug into the information needs and habits of this new tribe of media users.
  • Networked Individuals (Tampa)

    1. 1. How libraries can serve networked individuals<br />Lee Rainie, Director, Pew Internet Project<br />11.5.10<br />Tampa Bay Library Consortium<br />Email: Lrainie@pewinternet.org<br />Twitter: @Lrainie<br />
    2. 2. The internet is the change agent Thenand now<br />2000<br />46% of adults use internet<br />5% with broadband at home<br /><20% watch video online<br />53% own a cell phone<br />0% connect to internet wirelessly<br /><10% use “cloud”<br />0% tech social network users <br />= slow, stationary connections built around my computer<br />2010<br />74% of adults use internet<br />65% with broadband at home<br />>55% watch video online<br />85% own a cell phone<br />57% connect to internet wirelessly<br />>two-thirds use “cloud”<br />46% tech social network users<br />= fast, mobile connections on outside servers and storage<br />April 22, 2010<br />2<br />
    3. 3. Media ecology – then (industrial age)<br />Product Route to homeDisplayLocal storage<br />TV stations phone TV Cassette/ 8-track<br /> broadcast TV radio<br /> broadcast radio stereo Vinyl album<br />News mail<br />Advertising newspaper delivery phone<br /> paper<br />Radio Stations non-electronic<br />Adapted from Tom Wolzien, Sanford C. Bernstein & Co<br />3<br />
    4. 4. Media ecology – now (information age)<br />Product Route to homeDisplayLocal storage<br /> cable TiVo (PVR) VCR<br />TV stations DSL TV Satellite radio player<br />Info wireless/phone radio DVD<br />“Daily me” broadcast TV PC Web-based storage<br /> content books iPod /MP3 server/ TiVo (PVR)<br />Cable Nets broadcast radio stereo PC<br />Web sites satellite monitor web storage/servers<br />Local news mail headphones CD/CD-ROM<br />Content from express delivery pager satellite player cell phone memory<br /> individuals iPod / storage portable gamer MP3 player / iPod<br />Peer-to-peer subcarriers / WIFI cell phone pagers - PDAs<br />Advertising newspaper delivery non-electronic cable box<br />Radio stations camcorder/camera PDA/Palm game console<br />Appsgame console paper<br />Satellite radio e-reader / Kindle storage sticks/disks iPade-reader/Kindle<br />iPad<br />Adapted from Tom Wolzien, Sanford C. Bernstein & Co<br />4<br />
    5. 5. Media ecology – now (information age)<br />Product Route to homeDisplayLocal storage<br /> cable TiVo (PVR) VCR<br />TV stations DSL TV Satellite radio player<br />Info wireless/phone radio DVD<br />“Daily me” broadcast TV PC Web-based storage<br /> content books iPod /MP3 server/ TiVo (PVR)<br />Cable Nets broadcast radio stereo PC<br />Web sites satellite monitor web storage/servers<br />Local news mail headphones CD/CD-ROM<br />Content from express delivery pager satellite player cell phone memory<br /> individuals iPod / storage portable gamer MP3 player / iPod<br />Peer-to-peer subcarriers / WIFI cell phone pagers - PDAs<br />Advertising newspaper delivery non-electronic cable box<br />Radio stations camcorder/camera PDA/Palm game console<br /> game console paper<br />Satellite radio e-reader / Kindle storage sticks/disks e-reader/Kindle <br />Ubiquitous computing ageCloud computing“Internet of things”<br />Adapted from Tom Wolzien, Sanford C. Bernstein & Co<br />5<br />
    6. 6. 45% of adults own DVRs – <br />up from 3% in 2002<br />Media ecology – now (information age)<br />Product Route to homeDisplayLocal storage<br /> cable TiVo (PVR) VCR<br />TV stations DSL TV Satellite radio player<br />Info wireless/phone radio DVD<br />“Daily me” broadcast TV PC Web-based storage<br /> content books iPod /MP3 server/ TiVo (PVR)<br />Cable Nets broadcast radio stereo PC<br />Web sites satellite monitor web storage/servers<br />Local news mail headphones CD/CD-ROM<br />Content from express delivery pager satellite player cell phone memory<br /> individuals iPod / storage portable gamer MP3 player / iPod<br />Peer-to-peer subcarriers / WIFI cell phone pagers - PDAs<br />Advertising newspaper delivery non-electronic iPad<br />Radio stations camcorder/camera PDA/Palm game console<br />App game console paper<br />Satellite radio e-reader / Kindle storage sticks/disks iPad - tablet e-reader/Kindle <br />52% of adults own laptops – <br />up from 30% in 2006<br />42% of adults own game consoles<br />4% of adults own tablet computer - iPad<br />5% of adults own e-book readers - Kindle<br />47% of adults own MP3 players – <br />up from 11% in 2005<br />Adapted from Tom Wolzien, Sanford C. Bernstein & Co<br />6<br />
    7. 7. Media ecology – now (information age)<br />Networked creator universe<br /><ul><li>62% are social networking site users
    8. 8. ~50% share photos
    9. 9. 33% create content tags
    10. 10. 32% contribute rankings and ratings
    11. 11. 30% share personal creations
    12. 12. 26% post comments on sites and blogs
    13. 13. 24% use Twitter / other status update features
    14. 14. 15% have personal website
    15. 15. 15% are content remixers
    16. 16. 14% are bloggers
    17. 17. 4% use location-sharing services</li></ul>Product Route to homeDisplayLocal storage<br /> cable TiVo (PVR) VCR<br />TV stations DSL TV Satellite radio player<br />Info wireless/phone radio DVD<br />“Daily me” broadcast TV PC Web-based storage<br /> content books iPod /MP3 server/ TiVo (PVR)<br />Cable Nets broadcast radio stereo PC<br />Web sites satellite monitor web storage/servers<br />Local news mail headphones CD/CD-ROM<br />Content from express delivery pager satellite player cell phone memory<br /> individuals iPod / storage portable gamer MP3 player / iPod<br />Peer-to-peer subcarriers / WIFI cell phone pagers - PDAs<br />Advertising newspaper delivery non-electronic cable box<br />Radio stations camcorder/camera PDA/Palm game console<br /> game console paper<br />Satellite radio e-reader / Kindle storage sticks/disks e-reader/Kindle <br />Adapted from Tom Wolzien, Sanford C. Bernstein & Co<br />7<br />
    18. 18. 8<br />Information and media ecosystem changes <br />Volume of information grows<br />Variety of information sources increases<br />Velocity of information speeds up<br />Venues change -- times and places to experience media enlarge<br />
    19. 19. 9<br />Information and media ecosystem changes<br />Vigilance – attention to information and media expands AND contracts<br />Vibrant -- immersive qualities of media are more compelling – gaming; augmented reality<br />Valence -- relevance of information improves as customization/search tools emerge<br />Vivid -- social networks are more evident and more important as “coping” structures<br />
    20. 20. Media ecology – now (information age)<br />Product Route to homeDisplayLocal storage<br /> cable TiVo (PVR) VCR<br />TV stations DSL TV Satellite radio player<br />Info wireless/phone radio DVD<br />“Daily me” broadcast TV PC Web-based storage<br /> content books iPod /MP3 server/ TiVo (PVR)<br />Cable Nets broadcast radio stereo PC<br />Web sites satellite monitor web storage/servers<br />Local news mail headphones CD/CD-ROM<br />Content from express delivery pager satellite player cell phone memory<br /> individuals iPod / storage portable gamer MP3 player / iPod<br />Peer-to-peer subcarriers / WIFI cell phone pagers - PDAs<br />Advertising newspaper delivery non-electronic cable box<br />Radio stations camcorder/camera PDA/Palm game console<br /> game console paper<br />Satellite radio e-reader / Kindle storage sticks/disks e-reader/Kindle <br />… and this all affects social networks1) their composition2) their importance and the way people use them3) the way teachers and organizations can play a <br />part in them<br />Adapted from Tom Wolzien, Sanford C. Bernstein & Co<br />10<br />
    21. 21. Behold the idea of networked individualismBarry Wellman – University of Toronto<br />The turn from groups to social networks = a new social operating system<br />11<br />
    22. 22. Networked Individuals have a different …<br />Sense of information availability – it’s ambient<br />Sense of time – it’s oriented around “continuous partial attention”<br />Sense of community and connection – it’s about “absent presence” <br />Sense of the rewards and challenges of networking for social, economic, political, and cultural purposes – new layers and new audiences<br />12<br />
    23. 23. 13<br />Implications for libraries – 1 <br />You can be a node in people’s social networks as they seek information to help them solve problems and meet their needs<br />
    24. 24. 14<br />Implications for libraries – 2 <br />You can teach new literacies<br /> - screen literacy - graphics and symbols<br /> - navigation literacy<br /> - connections and context literacy<br /> - skepticism<br /> - value of contemplative time<br /> - how to create content<br /> - ethical behavior in new world<br />
    25. 25. 15<br />Implications for libraries – 3<br />Can re-vision your role in a world where much has changed<br />- Access to information<br /><ul><li>Value of information
    26. 26. Curatinginfo means more than collections
    27. 27. Creating media – networked creators should be your allies</li></li></ul><li>New ecosystem has changed the role that librarians can play in social networks<br />The four-step flow of information<br />attention<br />acquisition<br />assessment<br />action<br />16<br />
    28. 28. 17<br />How do you….<br />get his/her attention?<br /> use your traditional services (they still matter!)<br /> offer alerts, updates, feeds<br /> be available in “new” places<br /> find pathways to people through their social networks<br />
    29. 29. 18<br />How do you….<br />help him/her acquire information?<br /> make sure to offer services and media in many places<br /> find new ways to distribute your collections<br /> point people to good material through links<br /> participate in conversations about your work with your patrons<br />
    30. 30. 19<br />How do you….<br />help him/her assess information?<br />exploit your skills in knowing the highest quality material<br />aggregate the best related work<br />when you make mistakes, seek forgiveness<br />
    31. 31. 20<br />How do you….<br />assist him/her act on information?<br /> offer opportunities for feedback<br /> offer opportunities to learn how to use social media<br /> offer opportunities for community building<br />
    32. 32. 21<br />Why good social networks (and social networking) matter <br />Healthier<br />Wealthier<br />Happier<br />More civically engaged = better communities<br />
    33. 33. 22<br />Thank you!<br />Lee RainieDirector – Pew Internet ProjectLrainie@pewinternet.orgTwitter - @lrainie202-419-4500<br />

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