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’How do they even do that?’: How Today’s Technology is Shaping Tomorrow’s Students
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’How do they even do that?’: How Today’s Technology is Shaping Tomorrow’s Students

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In this wide-ranging new talk that was given as a part of Dartmouth College’s Strategic Planning process and their “Leading Voices in Higher Education Speaker Series ...

In this wide-ranging new talk that was given as a part of Dartmouth College’s Strategic Planning process and their “Leading Voices in Higher Education Speaker Series http://strategicplanning.dartmouth.edu/aspire/leading-voices-in-higher-education-speaker-series, Amanda Lenhart talked about the technological milieu of today’s teens and college students as they grew from children to young adults and the ways in which each major new technological development disrupted our previous communication strategies. The talk also explored the ways that social media is changing campus culture as well as how digital tools are changing where learning happens – MOOCs and mixed classes, flipped classrooms – as well as how it occurs for K-12 as well as within higher education.

To view all 71 minutes of the talk and Q &A, as well as shorter video on the future of the university, please visit: http://strategicplanning.dartmouth.edu/aspire/amanda-lenhart

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’How do they even do that?’: How Today’s Technology is Shaping Tomorrow’s Students ’How do they even do that?’: How Today’s Technology is Shaping Tomorrow’s Students Presentation Transcript

  • "How Do [They] EvenDo That?": HowTodays Technologyis ShapingTomorrows StudentsAmanda Lenhart | Pew Research CenterDartmouth CollegeApril 9, 2013
  • • Part of the Pew Research Center, a nonpartisan “fact tank” basedin Washington, DC• PRC’s mission is to provide high quality, objective data to thoughtleaders and policymakers• Pew data included in this talk is from nationally representativetelephone surveys of U.S. adults and teens (on landlines and cellphones)• Presentation slides and all data are available at pewinternet.org
  • I. WHAT IS THE TECHNOLOGICALENVIRONMENT OF TODAY’S TEENS?6/12/2013 3
  • 6/12/2013 4This is Elizabeth.She will be a firstyear college studentin the Fall of 2013.What kind oftechnology did shegrow up with?What kinds oftechnology does sheuse now?
  • WHAT ARE THE DISRUPTIONSSPURRED BY EACH OF THESEINNOVATIONS?6/12/2013 5
  • January 9, 2009 6Elizabeth – Born 1995PCs are 20 years oldEmail is 27 years oldToday:67% of teens useemailToday:93% of teens access adesktop/laptop @home
  • January 9, 2009 7Elizabeth – Born 1995Commercial cell phones were 17 years oldToday:78% of teens have a cell phone
  • Elizabeth – Born 1995January 9, 2009 8World Wide Web is 5years old.Today: 95% of teens use the internetFirst great browser – 1993Netscape IPO – Aug. 9,1995
  • January 9, 2009 9Elizabeth – Toddler yearsPalm Pilot – 1996Today:37% of teens own asmartphone
  • January 9, 2009 10Elizabeth – Toddler Years & Pre-schoolBlogs – 1997, 1999,2001, 200314% of online teens keepblogs (down from 30% atpeak
  • January 9, 2009 11Elizabeth – First GradeWikipedia - 2001Today:70% of online youth use Wikipedia
  • January 9, 2009 12Elizabeth – Mid-Elementary SchoolMySpace - 2003 Facebook - 2004Today:82% of online teens use social network sites
  • January 9, 2009 13Elizabeth – Fourth GradeYouTube – 2005Today:27% have recorded and then uploaded videos13% stream live video to the internet37% of teens use video chat
  • January 9, 2009 14Elizabeth is in 5th grade | Twitter – 2006Today:24% of teens use Twitter
  • Title of presentation 6/12/2013 15Elizabeth isin 6th Grade.Tumblr isfounded in2007.Today, 5%of teens useTumblr.
  • • T6/12/2013 16Elisabeth – 8th Grade – age 14Foursquare – 2009Today, 6% of teens“check-in” with their location
  • 6/12/2013 17Instagram – 2010Elizabeth is 14 – 9th grade.11% of teens use Instagram; 3% say theyuse it “most often” of social network sites.
  • Snapchat- Sept. 2011Too new to haveyouth data.6/12/2013 18
  • 46% of US adults used the internet5% had home broadband connections53% owned a cell phone0% connected to internet wirelessly0% used social network sites_________________________Information flowed mainly one wayInformation consumption was astationary activityInternet Use in the U.S. in 2000Slow, stationary connectionsbuilt around a desktopcomputer
  • 82% of US adults use the internet2/3 have broadband at home88% have a cell phone; 46% aresmartphone users19% have a tablet computer19% have an e-reader2/3 are wireless internet users65% of online adults use SNSThe Internet in 2012Mobile devices havefundamentally changed therelationship betweeninformation, time and space
  • II. CHANGES TO CAMPUS LIFE ANDCULTURE
  • SOCIAL MEDIA CHANGESFORMATION OF RELATIONSHIPS ONCAMPUS
  • “Although headed off to differentschools, they had a similarexperience of learning their roommateassignment and immediately turningto Facebook to investigate thatperson. Some had already begundeveloping deep, mediatedfriendships while others had alreadyasked for roommate transfers.Beyond roommates, all had usedFacebook to find other newly mintedfreshman, building relationships longbefore they set foot on campus.”– danah boyd
  • 6/12/2013 24When pre-frosh turn to Facebookbefore arriving on campus, they doso to find other people who sharetheir interests, values, andbackground. As such, they begin aself-segregation process that resultsin increased “homophily” oncampuses. Homophily is asociological concept that refers to thenotion that birds of a feather sticktogether. In other words, teensinadvertently undermine thecollegiate social engineering projectof creating diverse connectionsthrough common experiences.-danah boyd
  • SOCIAL MEDIA CHANGESINVESTMENT IN CAMPUSCOMMUNITY
  • Easier to maintain connections with home• 82% of teens 12-17 use social mediasites• 78% of teens have a cell phone, 37%have a smartphone• 37% of teens use video chat26
  • TECHNOLOGY CHANGES OURRELATIONSHIP TO PLACES6/12/2013 27
  • Augmented reality changes relationship to physicalplacesMerges data with physical place
  • III. CHANGES TO EXPECTATIONSAROUND LEARNING AND LEARNINGENVIRONMENTS
  • TECHNOLOGY IS THE CLASSROOM6/12/2013 30
  • Technology IS the classroom• MOOCs?• 3% of K-12 students haveexperience with distance learning• 270,000 youth go to virtual schools(out of 55.2 million K-12 students inUS)• Blended learning• Self-directed learning
  • “When we interview youngpeople, they will talk about howthe Internet makes it easy forthem to look around and surf forinformation in low risk andunstructured ways. Some kidsimmerse themselves in onlinetutorials, forums, and expertcommunities where they divedeep into topics and areas ofinterest, whether it is fandom,creative writing, making onlinevideos, or gaming communities.”– Mimi Ito“Young people aredesperate for learningthat is relevant andpart of the fabric oftheir social lives,where they aremaking choices abouthow, when, and whatto learn, without it allbeing mapped forthem in advance.”
  • TECHNOLOGY IN THE CLASSROOM6/12/2013 33
  • Bring Your Own DeviceBring Your Own Device
  • What do students do with cell phones in theclassroom?• 42% use the phone to look up information inclass• 38% take pictures or record a video for a classassignment• 18% upload school related content to the internet• 11% text in class with teacher or other studentas a part of a class assignment• 2% use an online cell phone platform like CELLY6/12/2013 37
  • The “Flipped Classroom”
  • K-12 teachers are not impressed• 87% of AP & NWP teacherssay these technologies arecreating an “easily distractedgeneration with shortattention spans”• 83% say amount of availableinformation is overwhelming• 76% of teachers “stronglyagree” that internet searchengines have conditionstudents to expect to findinformation quickly &easily• 67% say technologies “domore to distract studentsthan help themacademically.”• Discourages wide use ofresources and makes itharder to find crediblematerials
  • But teachers also find positives• 99% of AP & NWP teachers say it givesstudents access to wider range ofresources• 77% of teachers say internet & digitalsearch tools have “a mostly positive”impact on HS student research habits• 65% say it makes students more self-sufficient in their research
  • Final thoughts & questions• Technology changes our relationship to place, but thefundamental lure of the elite residential college will remain.• Continue to engage in practices that put people with differentexperiences together, to counteract the pull of technology of liketowards like• The learners walking through your doors will continue to beshaped by an ever-changing technological milieu – how much willyou move to meet them and how much will you hold on to thevalue and efficiencies of the current teaching models?• Are MOOCs the new textbook? Will we flip our classrooms withMOOCs?• How will colleges manage the challenges of distraction whileharnessing the promise and opportunities of bringing devices intothe classroom?6/12/2013 41
  • Katherine is8 monthsoldWhat will itbe like to bea collegestudentwhen sheattends, 17years fromnow?
  • Title of presentation 6/12/2013 43Amanda LenhartPew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Projecthttp://www.pewinternet.org@amanda_lenhartphoto by arcticpenguin