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E-patients and their hunt for health information

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How patients and caregivers seek health information in the digital age

How patients and caregivers seek health information in the digital age

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  • 1. E-patients and social media Lee Rainie, Director, Pew Internet Project - @lrainie 10.10.13 Hofstra University
  • 2. “Tell the truth, and trust the people” -- Joseph N. Pew, Jr. http://bit.ly/dUvWe3 http://bit.ly/100qMub
  • 3. Un-Hippocratic I SWEAR… I will impart a knowledge of the Art to my own sons, and those of my teachers, and to disciples bound by a stipulation and oath, according to the law of medicine, but to none others
  • 4. Lisa Kimbell email: “If you're reading this it's because I managed to convince Peter to send it which makes me very happy even tho I'm sure it makes Peter feel uncomfortable. I'm sending a check out to Oregon today…. Since most of us are far away, we can't do much of that but we can provide some cash to reduce the stress of figuring out how to deal with the day-to-day while they're dealing with something way more important.” Blogger Jessica Lipnack: “… because you are reading this post, you are connected to P+T. Without their pioneering ideas and frameworks, this kind of connection, between you and me right now, would be very different.” Then she quotes Lisa Kimbell’s email text
  • 5. Networked Individualism More important Differently composed Perform new functions Lubricated by social media
  • 6. Health care implications Source of caregiving Second opinions Providers as “nodes” Performing in public
  • 7. But the fundamentals still apply The last time you had a health issue, did you get information, care, or support from… Total yes Yes, online Yes, offline Yes, both Not a source A doctor or other health care professional 70% 1% 61% 8% 28% Friends and family 60 1 39 20 39 Others who have the same health condition 24 2 15 7 73 Source: Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project, August 7-September 6, 2012 Survey. N=3,014 adults. Margin of error for internet users (N=2,392) is +/- 2.6 percentage points.
  • 8. 3 tech revolutions
  • 9. Digital Revolution 1: Broadband at home - 70% (+10% more have smartphones) - Internet users overall: 85% 3% 70% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% June 2000 April 2001 March 2002 March 2003 April 2004 March 2005 March 2006 March 2007 April 2008 April 2009 May 2010 Aug 2011 April 2012 May 2013 Dial-up Broadband Broadband at home Dial-up at home
  • 10. The % of adult internet users who have looked online in the last 12 months for information about… 55% Specific disease or medical problem 43 Certain medical treatment or procedure 27 How to lose weight or how to control your weight 25 Health insurance, including private insurance, Medicare or Medicaid 19 Food safety or recalls 16 Drug safety or recalls 16 A drug you saw advertised 15 Medical test results 14 Caring for an aging relative or friend 12 Pregnancy and childbirth 11 How to reduce your health care costs 20 Any other health issue 72 at least one of the above topics
  • 11. Digital Revolution 2 Mobile – 91% … smartphone 56% … tablets 34% 326.4 Total U.S. population: 319 million 2012
  • 12. Changes in smartphone ownership 35% 48% 17% 46% 41% 12% 56% 35% 9% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Smartphone Other cell phone No cell phone May 2011 February 2012 May 2013
  • 13. Smartphone ownership by income/age 77% 47% 22% 8% 81% 68% 40% 21% 90% 87% 72% 43% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% 18-29 30-49 50-64 65+ Less than $30,000 $30,000-$74,999 $75,000 or more
  • 14. Mobile health info 2010 2012 All cell phone owners 17% 31% Men 17 29* Women 16 33* Age 18-29 29 42* 30-49 18 39* 50-64 7 19* 65+ 8 9 Race/Ethnicity White, non-Hispanic 15 27* Black, non-Hispanic 19 35* Hispanic 25 38* Annual household income Less than $30,000/yr 15 28* $30,000-$49,999 17 30* $50,000-$74,999 17 37* $75,000+ 22 37* Education level No high school diploma 16 17 High School grad 12 26* Some college 21 33* College+ 20 38* • 91% of adults own cells … of them … • 31% get health information • 9% get health text messages --- • 56% own smartphones … of them … • 19% have health apps
  • 15. Health apps All health app users (n=254) Exercise, fitness, pedometer or heart rate monitoring 38% Diet, food, calorie counter 31 Weight 12 Period or menstrual cycle 7 Blood pressure 5 WebMD 4 Pregnancy 3 Blood sugar or diabetes 2 Medication management (tracking, alerts, etc) 2 Mood * Sleep * 69% track health indicator for themselves or another … of them … • 49% of trackers say they keep track of progress “in their heads” • 34% say they track the data on paper, like in a notebook or journal • 21% say they use some form of technology to track their health data – and 7% use an app.
  • 16. Impact of tracking • 34% of self-trackers say their data collection has affected a health decision • 40% of self-trackers say it has led them to ask a doctor new questions or seek a second opinion • 46% of self-trackers say it has changed their overall approach to health Pew Internet/California HealthCare Foundation survey
  • 17. Digital Revolution 3 Social networking – 61% of all adults % of internet users 9% 89% 7% 78% 6% 60% 1% 43% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 18-29 30-49 50-64 65+
  • 18. The Landscape of Social Media Users (among adults) % of internet users who…. The service is especially appealing to Use Any Social Networking Site 72% Adults ages 18-29, women Use Facebook 71% Women, adults ages 18-29 Use Google+ 31% Higher educated LinkedIn 22% Adults ages 30-64, higher income, higher educated Use Pinterest 21% Women, adults under 50, whites, those with some college education Use Twitter 18% Adults ages 18-29, African-Americans, urban residents Use Instagram 17% Adults ages 18-29, African-Americans, Latinos, women, urban residents Use Tumblr 6% Adults ages 18-29 reddit 6% Men ages 18-29
  • 19. •54% of online health searches are conducted on behalf of someone else. •34% of online adults look at online reviews •26% in the last 12 months read about or watched someone else’s health experience • 18% have gone online to find others who might share the same health concerns. 11% of SNS users; 8% of Twitter users get medical info on the sites 80% of online health queries begin at search engines
  • 20. Different sources for different needs
  • 21. How online searches affect decisions (1) • 60% of e-patients say the information found online affected a decision about how to treat an illness or condition. • 56% say it changed their overall approach to maintaining their health or the health of someone they help take care of. • 53% say it lead them to ask a doctor new questions, or to get a second opinion from another doctor.
  • 22. • 49% say it changed the way they think about diet, exercise, or stress management. • 38% say it affected a decision about whether to see a doctor. • 38% say it changed the way they cope with a chronic condition or manage pain. How online searches affect decisions (2)
  • 23. What social networks do for patients: Why physicians can be “nodes” • Attention – act as sentries – alerts, social media interventions, pathways through new influencers • Assessment – act as trusted, wise companion – assess the accuracy of info, timeliness of info, transparency and rigor of info • Action – act as helpful producers/enablers – give people outlets for expression, interpretation of their creations
  • 24. Health outcomes payoff • Monitoring • Interventions and reinforcement • Skills training – meds/devices • Emotional and social support among peers • “Information prescriptions” • Amateur research contributions – online recruitment, communities and clinical trials
  • 25. Be not afraid