Course introductionENGAP1English for practical & professionalpurposes
Outline of meeting       • Introductions            – What are your practical & professional purposes?       • Course aims...
Introductions        • Who am I?        • Who are you?             – Name             – Educational background            ...
Course aims• From the curriculum:     – The purpose of this course is to assist the student’s short- and long-term       d...
Course aims• Emphasis on writing     – But most of what we’ll say about writing goes for public speaking as well• Formal c...
Course aims• MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers (4 edn.):     Effective writing depends as much on clarity and re...
Course aims• The central aim:     – To increase your general English language proficiency for the purposes of       applic...
Course outline: Seminars• 17.15-20, every other Thursday, 12B257     – Note the exception: Apr 18-19, Wed and Thu.• Meetin...
Course outline: Seminars• Meeting 3: Feb 23     –   Text-level structure; planning and outlining     –   Introductions and...
Course outline: Seminars• Meeting 5: Mar 22     –   Style and register     –   Subjectivity and objectivity     –   Being ...
Course outline: Seminars• Meeting 7: Apr 18-19     – Student presentations     – Half of the groups present on Wed 18th, 1...
Course outline: Course work        • Meetings             – Lectures/Seminars             – group discussions        • Stu...
Itslearning• The Itslearning course page will be the central information platform for  the course.•   Basic course informa...
Study groups• You will be divided into six study groups.• For most of the course, group work and peer feedback sessions ar...
Course literature• The main course book is     – Bailey, D. Academic Writing: A Handbook for International Students. 3rd e...
Course literature• Whenever you need more information, take the initiative to  supplement the course literature in the fol...
Tasks and assessment• Throughout the course, you will be expected to complete several  written and oral tasks.• Two main t...
Tasks and assessment• The main written project     – Adapt the nature of the project to what you need:          •   An aca...
Tasks and assessment• The main written project     – An initial proposal, giving a rough description of the topic, the aim...
Tasks and assessment• The oral presentation     – Individual (10 min presentation)     – or group (>5 min per speaker, 30-...
Tasks and assessment• The minor tasks     – Primarily to be viewed as exercises, not assessed work     – Focus on the proc...
Tasks and assessment• The minor tasks     – The expected process:          •   Receive a task in conjunction with a meetin...
What is and is not compulsory• Parts of the course are voluntary (but recommended):     – Seminar attendance (excepting th...
General grading criteria• Writing:     – The assessed text will be scored 0-5 in three categories – form, structure,      ...
General grading criteria• Writing:     – The assessed text will be scored 0-5 in three categories – form, structure,      ...
General grading criteria• Writing:     – The assessed text will be scored 0-5 in three categories – form, structure,      ...
General grading criteria• Speaking:   – The assessed presentation will be scored 0-5 in three categories – delivery,     s...
Welcome to ENGAP1!• Questions?ENGAP1 VT-12                        Peter Wikström, Karlstad university                     ...
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ENGAP1 Course introduction

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ENGAP1 Course introduction

  1. 1. Course introductionENGAP1English for practical & professionalpurposes
  2. 2. Outline of meeting • Introductions – What are your practical & professional purposes? • Course aims • Course outline – Seminars – Course work • Itslearning • Study groups • Course literature • Tasks and assessment • What is and is not mandatory • General grading criteriaENGAP1 VT-12 Peter Wikström, Karlstad university Dept. of languagespractical & professional purposes
  3. 3. Introductions • Who am I? • Who are you? – Name – Educational background – Field? • Academia • Education • Business • Law • …ENGAP1 VT-12 Peter Wikström, Karlstad university Dept. of languagespractical & professional purposes
  4. 4. Course aims• From the curriculum: – The purpose of this course is to assist the student’s short- and long-term development of his/her ability to communicate in English in formal and informal contexts. – After finishing the course, the student should be able to • communicate in English in various contexts in speech and writing, • show awareness of important peculiarities of English language communication, • use appropriate vocabulary and idioms for particular situations, • use language tools and other relevant resources to develop his/her command of the language.ENGAP1 VT-12 Peter Wikström, Karlstad university Dept. of languagespractical & professional purposes
  5. 5. Course aims• Emphasis on writing – But most of what we’ll say about writing goes for public speaking as well• Formal correctness – But awareness of register• ”Language tools and other relevant resources”: – Conceptual tools • Awareness of rhetorical situation • Levels: context; text; paragraph; sentence – Practical tools • Dictionaries, style guides, grammars • Peer feedbackENGAP1 VT-12 Peter Wikström, Karlstad university Dept. of languagespractical & professional purposes
  6. 6. Course aims• MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers (4 edn.): Effective writing depends as much on clarity and readability as on content. The organization and development of your ideas, the unity and coherence of your presentation, and your command of sentence structure, grammar, and diction are all important, as are the mechanics of writing—capitalization, spelling, punctuation, and so on. The key to successful communication is using the right language for the audience you are addressing.ENGAP1 VT-12 Peter Wikström, Karlstad university Dept. of languagespractical & professional purposes
  7. 7. Course aims• The central aim: – To increase your general English language proficiency for the purposes of application in practice – Note: not geared toward a specific area of practice • My own competence is in academic writing, but the course content should have general applicability.• We work toward that aim by means of: – Theoretical conceptual tools – Practical exercises – Study group sessionsENGAP1 VT-12 Peter Wikström, Karlstad university Dept. of languagespractical & professional purposes
  8. 8. Course outline: Seminars• 17.15-20, every other Thursday, 12B257 – Note the exception: Apr 18-19, Wed and Thu.• Meeting 1: Jan 26 – Course introduction• Meeting 2: Feb 9 – Writing for yourself and for others – Author and intended reader – Text types – Peer responseENGAP1 VT-12 Peter Wikström, Karlstad university Dept. of languagespractical & professional purposes
  9. 9. Course outline: Seminars• Meeting 3: Feb 23 – Text-level structure; planning and outlining – Introductions and conclusions – Paragraph-level structure – Basic text formatting• Meeting 4: Mar 8 – Sentence-level structure – Basic punctuation – Notes on vocabulary and spellingENGAP1 VT-12 Peter Wikström, Karlstad university Dept. of languagespractical & professional purposes
  10. 10. Course outline: Seminars• Meeting 5: Mar 22 – Style and register – Subjectivity and objectivity – Being a critical reader – Primer on language and gender• Meeting 6: Apr 5 – Public speaking – Structuring talk; presentations and conversations – Visual information (tables, graphs, …)ENGAP1 VT-12 Peter Wikström, Karlstad university Dept. of languagespractical & professional purposes
  11. 11. Course outline: Seminars• Meeting 7: Apr 18-19 – Student presentations – Half of the groups present on Wed 18th, 17.15-20. – The other half presents on Thu 19th, 17.15-20.• Meeting 8: May 3 – Quoting, paraphrasing, and summarizing – Referencing – Avoiding plagiarism – Rewriting and proofreadingENGAP1 VT-12 Peter Wikström, Karlstad university Dept. of languagespractical & professional purposes
  12. 12. Course outline: Course work • Meetings – Lectures/Seminars – group discussions • Study group meetings – Scheduled by your groups • Assigned reading • Tasks and exercises • Assessment tasksENGAP1 VT-12 Peter Wikström, Karlstad university Dept. of languagespractical & professional purposes
  13. 13. Itslearning• The Itslearning course page will be the central information platform for the course.• Basic course information; study guide, schedule, etc.• Bulletins with important information• Powerpoint presentations and other supplementary material• Tasks – receive instructions and hand in tasks• Discussion boards• Links to virtual study group roomsENGAP1 VT-12 Peter Wikström, Karlstad university Dept. of languagespractical & professional purposes
  14. 14. Study groups• You will be divided into six study groups.• For most of the course, group work and peer feedback sessions are voluntary (but highly recommended).• One task will require group cooperation, however.• Itslearning poll – How active would you like your group to be? • Meetings once per week or more often • Meetings about every other week • Work individually as much as possible• Any requests regarding study groups?ENGAP1 VT-12 Peter Wikström, Karlstad university Dept. of languagespractical & professional purposes
  15. 15. Course literature• The main course book is – Bailey, D. Academic Writing: A Handbook for International Students. 3rd edn. Routledge, 2011. • 2nd edn. should be fine as well. • Parts will be assigned reading throughout the course. • In general, the book should also serve you well as a quick reference work. Unsure about passives? Have a quick look in Bailey.• Beyond that, I will add some supplementary reading in the form of handouts or web links throughout the course.ENGAP1 VT-12 Peter Wikström, Karlstad university Dept. of languagespractical & professional purposes
  16. 16. Course literature• Whenever you need more information, take the initiative to supplement the course literature in the following ways: – Refer to weightier reference works in the library (e.g. Cambridge, Oxford, Cobuild…) – Search online (but be critical of your sources – merriam-webster.com is more reliable than wiktionary.com, for instance) – Get in touch with me – the idea is that I am supposed to be a resource.ENGAP1 VT-12 Peter Wikström, Karlstad university Dept. of languagespractical & professional purposes
  17. 17. Tasks and assessment• Throughout the course, you will be expected to complete several written and oral tasks.• Two main tasks: – Written project work • Deadline May 17 • Assessed for grade – Oral presentation • To be delivered individually or in group Apr 18-19 • Assessed for grade• Various minor tasks throughout the course. – Compulsory hand-ins for passing grade, but not assessedENGAP1 VT-12 Peter Wikström, Karlstad university Dept. of languagespractical & professional purposes
  18. 18. Tasks and assessment• The main written project – Adapt the nature of the project to what you need: • An academic essay • A research paper • A technical paper • An analytical report (business, politics, education… ) • A legal brief • … – Try to formulate a rough idea into a short proposal. – Whatever you do should be able to fit into a rough mold as follows:ENGAP1 VT-12 Peter Wikström, Karlstad university Dept. of languagespractical & professional purposes
  19. 19. Tasks and assessment• The main written project – An initial proposal, giving a rough description of the topic, the aim of the project, and the method by which it will be carried out; – An abstract summarizing the project (to be finished last); – A title page and table of contents; – A main text basic introduction–body–conclusion structure; – A body including an account of method, some kind of findings, and an analysis/discussion of these findings; – At least a few in-text references and a list of references, using a consistent referencing scheme; – About 2500-3500 words in length.ENGAP1 VT-12 Peter Wikström, Karlstad university Dept. of languagespractical & professional purposes
  20. 20. Tasks and assessment• The oral presentation – Individual (10 min presentation) – or group (>5 min per speaker, 30-40 minutes for the entire group) – Free choice of topic, but it may be a good idea to base your presentation on your written project if you are doing it individually. – Keep to a basic introduction–body–conclusion structure. – Use some form of visual or other aid. Whiteboard, PP, video, handouts, physical props. – Focus on delivery: Try to be clear, structured, and fluent; try to speak to the audience; try to keep a tone suitable to the content.ENGAP1 VT-12 Peter Wikström, Karlstad university Dept. of languagespractical & professional purposes
  21. 21. Tasks and assessment• The minor tasks – Primarily to be viewed as exercises, not assessed work – Focus on the process of producing the texts – Several of the tasks can be tied to your written project, should you wish it. – Examples of tasks: • Formal and informal letters • Curriculum vitae; résumé • The five paragraph argumentative essay • Task instructions • Brief text analysis • OutlineENGAP1 VT-12 Peter Wikström, Karlstad university Dept. of languagespractical & professional purposes
  22. 22. Tasks and assessment• The minor tasks – The expected process: • Receive a task in conjunction with a meeting • Complete a first draft within one week • Share it with your study group • Meet in your study groups to discuss each others texts – Meet virtually (discussion boards, Adobe Connect) – Or on campus • Revise your text based on discussion • Hand in revised text using the assignment on Itslearning. – Always proofread and spell check your writing!ENGAP1 VT-12 Peter Wikström, Karlstad university Dept. of languagespractical & professional purposes
  23. 23. What is and is not compulsory• Parts of the course are voluntary (but recommended): – Seminar attendance (excepting the presentations Apr 18-19) – All study group meetings (excepting the group task) – Reading the course literature• All tasks to be handed in are compulsory for a passing grade (G). – All tasks must be handed in, and revision is mandatory if requested.• The main writing and speaking tasks are compulsory. – The presentations Apr 18-19 – The written project, deadline May 17 – Your final grade – pass (G), or distinction (VG) – will be based on these two tasks, with your other hand-ins serving as a tilt.ENGAP1 VT-12 Peter Wikström, Karlstad university Dept. of languagespractical & professional purposes
  24. 24. General grading criteria• Writing: – The assessed text will be scored 0-5 in three categories – form, structure, and content. A passing grade (G) requires a minimum score of 2 per category. Distinction (VG) requires a minimum score of 4 per category. Form 5 The text shows essentially flawless spelling, grammar, punctuation, vocabulary, and basic formatting, as well as good use of genre-appropriate style. 4 3 The text shows passable spelling, grammar, punctuation, vocabulary, and style. 2 1 The text is very weak with regard to the above considerations. 0ENGAP1 VT-12 Peter Wikström, Karlstad university Dept. of languagespractical & professional purposes
  25. 25. General grading criteria• Writing: – The assessed text will be scored 0-5 in three categories – form, structure, and content. A passing grade (G) requires a minimum score of 2 per category. Distinction (VG) requires a minimum score of 4 per category. Structure The text shows a remarkably well developed structure (of arguments, narrative, 5 etc.), in terms of sequential disposition, paragraph unity and cross-paragraph 4 coherence. 3 The text shows passably clear and developed structure. 2 1 The text is very weak with regard to the above considerations. 0ENGAP1 VT-12 Peter Wikström, Karlstad university Dept. of languagespractical & professional purposes
  26. 26. General grading criteria• Writing: – The assessed text will be scored 0-5 in three categories – form, structure, and content. A passing grade (G) requires a minimum score of 2 per category. Distinction (VG) requires a minimum score of 4 per category. Content The text clearly establishes and develops a topic suitable to the text type, 5 sticks to the topic, and makes the topic highly relevant 4 (interesting/entertaining/persuasive) to the reader. 3 The text is passable in terms of establishing and sticking to a suitable topic. 2 1 The text is very weak with regard to the above considerations. 0ENGAP1 VT-12 Peter Wikström, Karlstad university Dept. of languagespractical & professional purposes
  27. 27. General grading criteria• Speaking: – The assessed presentation will be scored 0-5 in three categories – delivery, structure, and content. A passing grade (G) requires a minimum score of 2 per category. Distinction (VG) requires a minimum score of 4 per category. Delivery The presentation is delivered in a controlled and clear manner, makes good 5 use of relevant visual (or other) aids, and keeps within any time limit or other 4 constraints. 3 The presentation shows passable control, clarity, use of aids, and conformity to constraints. 2 1 The presentation is very weak with regard to the above considerations. 0ENGAP1 VT-12 Peter Wikström, Karlstad university Dept. of languagespractical & professional purposes
  28. 28. Welcome to ENGAP1!• Questions?ENGAP1 VT-12 Peter Wikström, Karlstad university Dept. of languagespractical & professional purposes
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