Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
R.F.I.D.
Radio Frequency Identification Device
June 22, 2005




Megan Falzone
Henry Hagopian
Rina Rub
Eric Schaeffer
Presentation Agenda
   Definition and Technology Overview

   Benefits to Implementation

   Barriers to Adoption

   ...
Overview
RFID – Radio Frequency Identification
   Means     of storing and retrieving data
   What    does it do?
     ...
RFID Tags
   Tags
       Active Tags
       Passive Tags
            Non-battery (Pure Passive)
            Battery (...
History
   Scientific Community
      1948 - RFID theory invented in a paper entitled “Communication
       by Means of ...
RFID Technology Spending on the Rise

 7
 6

 5
 4
 3                                                $ in Billions

 2
 1
...
Technological Benefits
    Advanced Monitoring

    Data Advantages

    Re-writeable Tags

    Withstand Harsh Condit...
RFID—Why Not?

   Implementation: From Barcodes to RFID
     Cost    Prohibitive and Labor Intensive

       Incompatib...
RFID—Why Not?
   Privacy Concerns

     ClientIdentification and
      Tracking

     Other    Nefarious Uses

     RF...
RFID—Why Not?
   Lack of Regulation and Standardization

     Need     for Standard Frequency
           Defines tag an...
EPCGlobal

   Gen2 EPCGlobal:
     Mission: Set Global
      Standard for Electronic
      Product Codes/RFID
     Stan...
RFID in Action Today
   Contactless Payment Systems

    ExxonMobil              Speedpass
         First introduced by...
RFID in Action Today
 Electronic       Toll Collection
     MTA Fast Lane (E-ZPass System)
          Auto Transponder -...
Leading the RFID Charge with
Suppliers




  10,000 Suppliers




                         43,000 Suppliers
Leading the RFID Charge with Suppliers


     June 2003 - Ultimatum to 100 largest suppliers

     By April 2005 – 23,00...
The Future of RFID



“For the life of me, I cannot understand why
     terrorists have not attacked our food
     supply,...
RFID and the Nation’s Food Supply
   Opportunities for Foul Play Exist in the Food Chain

   Public Health Security and ...
Calling Dr. RFID

 Patient   Identification
      Jacobi Medical Center (NY) and Saarbrucken Hospital (Germany)
      O...
Big Brother’s Passport to Pry

    US State Dept. plan to have US Passport embedded with
     a passive RFID chip by the ...
Conclusions
   Widespread RFID solutions are on the horizon
        Well beyond inventory management

   The most impor...
R.F.I.D. Radio Frequency Identification Device
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

R.F.I.D. Radio Frequency Identification Device

930

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
930
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
45
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Transcript of "R.F.I.D. Radio Frequency Identification Device "

  1. 1. R.F.I.D. Radio Frequency Identification Device June 22, 2005 Megan Falzone Henry Hagopian Rina Rub Eric Schaeffer
  2. 2. Presentation Agenda  Definition and Technology Overview  Benefits to Implementation  Barriers to Adoption  RFID Applications  Current  Future
  3. 3. Overview RFID – Radio Frequency Identification  Means of storing and retrieving data  What does it do?  Sends information via an electromagnetic transmission to an RF compatible circuit  Components  Reader with an Antenna  RFID Tag
  4. 4. RFID Tags  Tags  Active Tags  Passive Tags  Non-battery (Pure Passive)  Battery (Semi-Passive)  Memory Type  Read / Write  Memory can be read, stored, and revised  Higher cost  Read Only  Programmed at factory  Lower cost
  5. 5. History  Scientific Community  1948 - RFID theory invented in a paper entitled “Communication by Means of Reflected Power” in 1948  Government Involvement  1975 - Los Alamos Scientific Laboratories (LASL)  Releases research to public  Publishes “Short Range Radio-Telemetry for Electronic Identification Using Modulated Backscatter”  Commercial Involvement  1991 - Texas Instruments subsidiary TIRIS develops and markets RFID
  6. 6. RFID Technology Spending on the Rise 7 6 5 4 3 $ in Billions 2 1 0 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 Source: ABI Research
  7. 7. Technological Benefits  Advanced Monitoring  Data Advantages  Re-writeable Tags  Withstand Harsh Conditions  Direct Line-of-Sight Not Required  Flexible Read Range  Multiple Simultaneous Reads
  8. 8. RFID—Why Not?  Implementation: From Barcodes to RFID  Cost Prohibitive and Labor Intensive  Incompatibility  11-digit barcode vs. 13-digit RFID tag  Requires Evaluation of IT Infrastructure  Capacity to handle and store terabytes of data?
  9. 9. RFID—Why Not?  Privacy Concerns  ClientIdentification and Tracking  Other Nefarious Uses  RFDump
  10. 10. RFID—Why Not?  Lack of Regulation and Standardization  Need for Standard Frequency  Defines tag and reader relationship  Impacts transmission range and speed  Multiple Global Groups = Multiple Conflicting Standards  GM Case
  11. 11. EPCGlobal  Gen2 EPCGlobal:  Mission: Set Global Standard for Electronic Product Codes/RFID  Standard for Passive Tag Recently Sent to ISO for Review  Consumer Privacy Guidelines
  12. 12. RFID in Action Today  Contactless Payment Systems ExxonMobil Speedpass  First introduced by Mobil in 1997 (and Exxon-branded service stations in 2001)  Speedpass uses RFID reader located in the pump to talk to a small transponder device.  Example of a passive tag - programmed with a unique code  Simple and convenient for the customer  Point device at the reader and credit card is automatically charged.  More than 6 million active Speedpass devices in the US
  13. 13. RFID in Action Today  Electronic Toll Collection  MTA Fast Lane (E-ZPass System)  Auto Transponder -Example of an Active tag  Tag communicates vehicle identification and classification within milliseconds  266,000 drivers - almost half of the Turnpike's toll transactions - use FAST LANE each day.  More than 700,000 vehicles currently have FAST LANE transponders.  E-ZPass System on the Route 95 Corridor Maine to Maryland
  14. 14. Leading the RFID Charge with Suppliers 10,000 Suppliers 43,000 Suppliers
  15. 15. Leading the RFID Charge with Suppliers  June 2003 - Ultimatum to 100 largest suppliers  By April 2005 – 23,000 pallets tagged by suppliers  Currently using passive tags – need to be scanned  Six million reads in a month  Improving the retailer’s ability to track inventory  RFID currently installed in 104 stores and 36 Sam’s Club’s  Plans to have in 600 stores and 12 distribution centers by year-end.  Wal-Mart’s next 200 suppliers have to start tagging by 2006.
  16. 16. The Future of RFID “For the life of me, I cannot understand why terrorists have not attacked our food supply, because it is so easy to do.”  Tommy Thompson, Former Health and Human Services Secretary December, 2004.
  17. 17. RFID and the Nation’s Food Supply  Opportunities for Foul Play Exist in the Food Chain  Public Health Security and Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response Act of 2002 “Track and Trace”  4-8 hours to provide access to FDA if threat exists  “Track and Trace” rules are primary reason for implementing RFID  Information associated with RFID tags would be very beneficial in the product-recall process.  The recent Mad Cow scare is driving the cattle industry to adopt RFID
  18. 18. Calling Dr. RFID  Patient Identification  Jacobi Medical Center (NY) and Saarbrucken Hospital (Germany)  Outfitted over 1,200 patients with RFID wristband  Allows Doctors instant access medical history with a wireless PDA  Prevention of Surgical Mix-ups  Five to Eight wrong-site surgeries per month in the US  New RFID technology approved by the FDA in Nov. 2004  Surgichip is a 2-by-1 inch RFID encoded tag  Tags are read by OR staff to confirm patient procedure
  19. 19. Big Brother’s Passport to Pry  US State Dept. plan to have US Passport embedded with a passive RFID chip by the end of 2005  A target in your pocket?  Early tests showed chip may be read from yards away  May identify US citizens abroad  Vulnerable to identity theft at home  Public Outcry - comment period ended in April 2005  Feds now “taking a very serious look” at a privacy solution
  20. 20. Conclusions  Widespread RFID solutions are on the horizon  Well beyond inventory management  The most important technological development for retailers since the barcode  A $7 Billion global RFID market by 2008  Many challenges still exist  Privacy issues raised by consumer groups  Tags are still relatively expensive compared to barcodes  High up-front costs – software, hardware, data storage, security solutions, and technology implementation
  1. A particular slide catching your eye?

    Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

×