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RFID in Humans presentation
RFID in Humans presentation
RFID in Humans presentation
RFID in Humans presentation
RFID in Humans presentation
RFID in Humans presentation
RFID in Humans presentation
RFID in Humans presentation
RFID in Humans presentation
RFID in Humans presentation
RFID in Humans presentation
RFID in Humans presentation
RFID in Humans presentation
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RFID in Humans presentation

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Transcript

  • 1. RFID Use In Humans Dionne Johnson and Jenna Seagraves COMP380 12/06/06
  • 2. RFID
    • -“Radio Frequency Identification”
    • -The idea for implanting a chip in humans came from the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks to help identify firefighters if they were to become disfigured or trapped
  • 3. RFID (cont’d)
    • - implanted in fatty tissue of the arm
    • - near rear of triceps
    • - chip last at least 10 years
    • - safe in MRI scans
    • - no risk of allergic reactions
    • - encased in non-reactive medical-grade glass coating
    • - Cost: $125, not including implantation
    • - Passive vs. Active chips
  • 4. VeriChip
    • -First FDA-approved
    • human implantable
    • RFID device (2002)
    • -about the size of a grain of rice
    • - Read range is about 6 to 18 inches
    • -responds with a unique 16 digit number
    • -approximately 2000 implanted in humans worldwide
  • 5. SECURITY ISSUES
  • 6. PROS:
    • - ensures only authorized personnel enter into secure buildings
    • - harder to replicate compared to social security cards
    • - no current GPS capabilities
    • - can not track in real time
    • - chip contains no information, only a number
    • - only authorized personnel access database where information is stored
    • - consumers choose what information to include in the database
  • 7. CONS:
    • -”spychips”
    • -government is able to monitor someone's movement against their will
    • -track and monitor both citizens and visitors
    • -government could access information they can’t legally obtain as of now
    • -insecure
    • -unencrypted
    • -identity theft
    • -lead to safety issues
    • -more criminal activity
    • -more kidnappings, attacks, or murders to obtain chip
  • 8. MEDICAL ISSUES
  • 9. PROS:
    • - access to medical information if patient can not respond
    • - ensures doctors receive accurate and updated information
    • - Could track patients in hospital and send alerts if they collapsed
      • - When used with an active chip and an antenna
  • 10. CONS:
    • -potential health risks
    • -security issues
    • -reliability issues
    • -threat to medical confidentiality
  • 11. Uses
    • - Currently used in:
    • - Federal buildings in Mexico
    • - Clubs in Barcelona, Spain
    • - Prisons in the United States
    • - Hospitals in the U.S.
  • 12. Scenarios
    • - A child is found roaming the streets and cannot give information on how to find home…
    • - Someone is badly injured and has no identification on them, how can you get in touch with family or retrieve their health information?
    • - A power outage causes the medical database to crash and all your information is in the system, what do you do?
    • - Someone is able to steal your RFID chip number, how can they be stopped from accessing your information?
  • 13. More Things to Think About…
    • - Should there be a separate RFID chip for medical and security use?
    • - Should the chip’s number match the National Identification Card number?

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