“RFID” MAKING LIFE EASIER




             Prepared for
           Professor Walker
Professor of Business Communications
 ...
Letter of Authorization                                                                   ii



November 8, 2005




Profe...
Letter of Authorization                                                          iii


Written Report:
Your managerial rep...
Letter of Transmittal                                                                 iv


                               ...
Operating Agreement                                                                        v



Mission Statement

The Goo...
Operating Agreement                                                                    vi


Meeting Attendance
  1. Each t...
Operating Agreement                                                                  vii


Signatures of Team Members

By ...
TABLE OF CONTENTS


Letter of Authorization…………………………………………………………………ii
Letter of Transmittal……………………………………………………………………iv
O...
Abstract


With the increasing technology in the cell phone industry, there are constantly new and
clever ideas being crea...
INTRODUCTION TO RFID




Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) is an automatic identification method, relying on
storing a...
are used as electronic cash, e.g. SmarTrip in Washington, DC, USA, EasyCard in
Taiwan, T-Money in South Korea, Octopus Car...
SPECIFIC ISSUES RELATED TO RFID

Security

The threat to privacy that involves RFID technology concerns when a tag can be ...
CONSUMER ANALYSIS

When creating a new company it’s especially important to determine who the target
audience is. If you t...
COMPETITIVE ASSESSMENT

When creating a new company it’s also important to consider who would be your
competitor. Our comp...
“Merchants lose money by having customers stand in line,” says Sue Gordon-Lathrop, vice
president of consumer products pla...
ISO 14443), much as they did with the mag stripe. That means that one day, your phone,
        like your wallet, will cont...
just a simple device to your cell phone. According to Zigbee, Samsung will be
investigating the possibility of installing ...
CONCLUSION AND FINAL RECOMMENDATIONS

With our product having an RFID chip in it, our consumers will be able to make their...
WORKS CITED

Collins, J. (2004, September 20) Test Set for RFID-Enabled Phones.
          Retrieved on November 10, 2005, ...
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  1. 1. “RFID” MAKING LIFE EASIER Prepared for Professor Walker Professor of Business Communications Kennesaw State University 1000 Chastain Road Kennesaw, GA 30144 Prepared by Jenny Kendzora Jimmy Noble Shaunte Richards Shirley Waters George D. Wilson November 21, 2005
  2. 2. Letter of Authorization ii November 8, 2005 Professor Walker Professor of Business Communications Kennesaw State University 1000 Chastain Road Kennesaw, GA 30144 BISM 2100 Students, The purpose of this assignment is to integrate the material you have learned about Business Information Systems into a coordinated report and presentation and to allow students to focus on an emerging technology. You are being asked to perform a detailed analysis of RFID (Radio Frequency Identification). • An Introduction to RFID – What is it? What will it do? How will it affect the business as we know it today? • The background of RFID – What problem is it trying to solve? Who is pushing for RFID? • Issues related to RFID implementation – What does this mean for today’s business? For Customers? • Specific issues related to RFID – Security? Cost? Privacy? • Competitive assessment – Which is at the forefront of this emerging technology? • Recommendations – What are the potential uses for our company? The information contained in your presentation will be used as a training tool for Information Technology Students and Staff. You will therefore want to present a carefully researched, thoughtfully written, and comprehensive formal report. Use a FORMAL REPORT structure for the report. Be creative and complete in your analyses and presentation. You should gather and include any analyses necessary to appropriately convey an understanding of RFID and its impact on business. Use both commercial and academic resources (Minimum of 5 each). Where appropriate, you should incorporate charts, graphs, or other visual aids to illustrate the facts you present both in your report and PowerPoint presentation. Use an internal attribution style. (APA)
  3. 3. Letter of Authorization iii Written Report: Your managerial report must be submitted through WEBCT. (Each student must submit a copy of his or her team’s output through WebCT). Written Report Criteria: A comprehensive formal report employing effective business writing 30 points techniques (Chapter 5, Thill/Bovee, 2005) Thorough research of sources – academic and commercial 10 points Attributions and Citations done properly 10 points Operating Agreement included AFTER the Letter of Transmittal 10 points Detailed analysis covering requirements stated above 30 points Well developed recommendations 10 points Operating Agreement Criteria: Breakdown of Components: Value Points Awarded Team Objective and Mission Statement 1 Purpose – Define Research Topic – type 1 of software Decision-making – How will team make 1 decisions? Team Leader and Structure discussed 1 Meeting attendance policy 1 Preparation and performance – define 1 quality Non-performance and peer-review 1 Outline project requirements (Work 1 breakdown structure) Meeting Schedule (meeting facilitator?) 1 Project Schedule with schedule of 1 deliverables
  4. 4. Letter of Transmittal iv Team Goonies Kennesaw State University 1000 Chastain Road Kennesaw, GA 30144 November 21, 2005 Professor Walker Professor of Business Communications Kennesaw State University 1000 Chastain Road Kennesaw, GA 30144 Dear Professor Walker: Our team is in receipt of your Letter of Authorization dated November 8, 2005. We have thoroughly researched the topic and compiled a Formal Business Report detailing the information the team discovered. The topic the team chose to research was the uses of RFID in your cell phone to replace your wallet and enable keyless entry into your house. The following report will detail an introduction to RFID, the background of RFID, the implementation of RFID, security and cost issues surrounding RFID, a consumer analysis of RFID and our team’s recommendations for the future. Thank you for giving Team Goonies an opportunity to research such an up and coming product. Sincerely, Jenny Kendzora, Report Writer Team Goonies
  5. 5. Operating Agreement v Mission Statement The Goonies' mission is to provide an innovative product in a saturated market, but using a relatively untapped source of technology known as RFID. Our product will give our customers easy access to their home, car and finances. We will provide the highest level of security available to ensure the privacy of our customers while using our product. Purpose Team Goonies will achieve team excellence and attain project objectives by adhering to the following guidelines, which the team has agreed upon. Effective Date The Team Goonies operating agreement is effective November 3, 2005, and adopted by each team member whose signature appears below. Accountabilities of Team Associates 1. Each team member is expected to perform to their maximum potential on all projects related to the assignment. Team members who possess exceptional strengths and skills in different areas will be expected to lend guidance and assistance as needed. 2. Each team member will be expected to be committed and held accountable for positive and equal contributions to the project. 3. Each team member will be expected to confront each assignment with a positive attitude. Decision Making 1. Team Goonies believes in the concept of teamwork and will discuss the critical criteria areas in a diplomatic process to determine the most strategic outcome for our goals. 2. Each team member’s suggestions will be taken under advisory. Team Leader and Structure 1. Each team member is expected to be a leader in his or her individual roles. 2. Team Goonies has not elected one individual in this capacity, as each member is accountable for their role.
  6. 6. Operating Agreement vi Meeting Attendance 1. Each team member is expected to attend scheduled meetings unless an emergency arises. 2. Each team member is expected to check his or her email daily and respond as needed. Preparation and Performance 1. Each team member is expected to prepare required assignments on time. 2. Each team member is expected to adhere to the guidelines presented in class and reference the BISM textbook as needed. 3. Each team member’s quality is expected to be at a degree or grade of excellence or worth. Non-performance and Peer-review 1. Each team member will use the Peer Evaluation form provided with the assignment. 2. Each team member will be honest in evaluating the performance and work ethic of their team members. 3. Team members who fail to attend scheduled meeting, meet deadlines, cause disruption in the group or not fully participate will be penalized on the Peer Evaluation form. Work Structure 1. Lead Researcher 2. Formal Report Writer 3. Strategic Planner 4. Web Designer 5. Presentation Technologist Meeting Schedule 1. Each team member was required to attend meetings on November 2nd, 7th, 8th and 11th, 2005.. 2. Additionally, before and after each class period team members would discuss the progress of their assignments. Project Schedule of Deliverables 1. November 21, 2005 – Formal Report due 2. November 25, 2005 – Web Pages due 3. December 2, 2005 – Video Presentation due 4. December 6, 2005 – Peer Review and Analysis due
  7. 7. Operating Agreement vii Signatures of Team Members By each team member’s signature set forth below, they agree with the conditions of the agreement and will adhere to the mission of our company: Jenny Kendzora Jenny Kendzora Signature Date Jimmy Noble Signature Date Shaunte Richards Signature Date Shirley Waters Signature Date George D. Wilson Signature Date
  8. 8. TABLE OF CONTENTS Letter of Authorization…………………………………………………………………ii Letter of Transmittal……………………………………………………………………iv Operating Agreement…………………………………………………………………....v INTRODUCTION………………………………………………………………………1 WHAT DOES THIS MEAN FOR TODAYS BUSINESS……………………………...2 SPECIFIC ISSUES RELATED TO RFID………………………………………………3 Security………………………………………………………………………...3 Privacy…………………………………………………………………………3 Cost…………………………………………………………………………….3 CONSUMER ANALYSIS……………………………………………………………….4 COMPETITIVE ASSESSMENT………………………………………………………...5 OUR PRODUCT & WHO IT IS INTENDED FOR……………………………………...5 Replacing your wallet…………………………………………………………...5 Wireless Hook-Up……………………………………………………………....7 INFORMAL SURVEY…………………………………………………………………...8 RECOMMENDATIONS………………………………………………………………...9 WORK CITED…………………………………………………………………………...10 LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS Cell phone usage………………………………………………………………………….4 Informal survey…………………………………………………………………………...8
  9. 9. Abstract With the increasing technology in the cell phone industry, there are constantly new and clever ideas being created for cell phone users. Such things like text messaging, downloading of music, and being able to surf the web all through a tiny little cell phone. In the past 5 years, the new technology has drawn younger age groups to the overwhelmingly growing population of cell phone users. Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) is an automatic identification method that our cell phone company has installed within our product. Installing RFID in cell phones has created an older target audience. Our company is going to allow consumers to use their cell phones with the RFID chip inside in two new convenient ways. One is to be able to make purchases at retail stores instead of using actual credit cards, and the other is being able to use their cell phones as a keyless entry into their home. Our company offers everything the other cell phone companies do, but now with an RFID chip which will bring an upraise of consumers to our company.
  10. 10. INTRODUCTION TO RFID Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) is an automatic identification method, relying on storing and remotely retrieving data using devices called RFID tags or transponders. An RFID tag is a small object that can be attached to or incorporated into a product, animal, or person. RFID tags contain antennas to enable them to receive and respond to radio- frequency queries from an RFID transceiver. Passive tags require no internal power source, whereas active tags require a power source. It has been suggested that RFID has been around since the 1920’s. However, additional sources state that the RFID systems were introduced in the late 1960’s. The use of RFID in tracking and access applications first appeared during the 1980’s. There are two types of RFID tags: Passive RFID tags have no internal power supply. The minute electrical current induced in the antenna by the incoming radio frequency signal provides just enough power for the integrated circuit (IC) in the tag to power up and transmit a response. Most passive tags signal by backscattering the carrier signal from the reader. This means that the aerial has to be designed to both collect power from the incoming signal and also to transmit the outbound backscatter signal (Wikipedia). Active RFID tags, on the other hand, have an internal power source which is used to power any Ics and generate the outgoing signal. They may have longer range and larger memories than passive tags, as well as the ability to store additional information sent by the transceiver. At present, the smallest active tags are about the size of a coin. Many active tags have practical ranges of tens of metres, and a battery life of up to 10 years. Because passive tags are cheaper to manufacture and have no battery, the majority of RFID tags in existence are of the passive variety. Currently the usage of RFID is quite large spread. High-frequency RFID tags are used in library book or bookstore tracking, pallet tracking, building access control, airline baggage tracking, and apparel item tracking. High-frequency tags are widely used in identification badges, replacing earlier magnetic stripe cards. These badges need only be held within a certain distance of the reader to authenticate the holder. The American Express Blue credit card now includes a high-frequency RFID tag, a feature American Express calls ExpressPay. Additionally, Some smart cards embedded with RFID chips 1
  11. 11. are used as electronic cash, e.g. SmarTrip in Washington, DC, USA, EasyCard in Taiwan, T-Money in South Korea, Octopus Card in Hong Kong and the Netherlands and Oyster Card on the London Underground in the United Kingdom to pay fares in mass transit systems and/or retails (Wikipedia.org). At this time there is no global public body that governs the frequencies used for RFID. Some of the main governing bodies are: • USA – FCC (Federal Communications Commission) • Canada – DOC (Department of Communications) • Europe – ERO (European Radiocommunications Office) • Japan – MPHPT (Minsitry of Public Management, Home Affairs, Post and Telecommunications) • China – Misnistry of Information Industry • Australia – Australian Communication Authority • New Zeland – Ministry of Economic Development WHAT DOES THIS MEAN FOR TODAYS BUSINESS Implementation What does this mean for today’s business? For today’s customers? RFID technology is not going to change today’s business as much as it will change how we do business. RFID is going to spark a revolution for how information is transmitted. One of the first places to make drastic changes will be in the retail sector. For one example, RFID will not change the business of buying groceries. Consumers will still travel to a store, shop for their groceries, and pay for them. What RFID will change is how some of these processes are completed. Instead of scanning each item’s barcode, consumers would simply push their shopping cart through a sensor. The products in the shopping cart will be charged to the customer without any physical interaction. It is these small changes that will transform how we do the business of today. The process of paying for the groceries can also be made easier for the consumer. An RFID embedded in a credit card or other object could automatically charge the groceries to an account. One of the issues holding back widespread implementation of RFID tags in the retail industry is the fact that all manufacturers will need to add RFID tags to their products for full automation. It may prove more costly for businesses to identify which products have ID tags and which do not, than to continue the current processes. For RFID to really become a standard, all the producers for a certain market need to adopt changes at the same time. This could mean unexpected costs for companies who must update their product line or risk losing business. Certain Wal-Mart markets are beginning to require RFID tags on their vendor’s products. (Making the Cast to Deploy RFID by Mark Leon) In this case, manufacturers must comply with the wished of their retailers or risk losing Wal-Mart’s business and most of their income. 2
  12. 12. SPECIFIC ISSUES RELATED TO RFID Security The threat to privacy that involves RFID technology concerns when a tag can be read, who can read the tag, and how information can be protected against being read by the wrong person or at the wrong time. To keep a tag from being activated at a wrong time, researchers are developing special “sleep” and “kill” commands into the chips. When the chip receives this command it will become inactive, temporarily or permanently. To keep the tags from being read by the wrong person, or someone actively trying to take advantage of the information contained, sensitive information will have to be encrypted. The idea that an RFID tag could be cloned adds another problem to the list. A quick and easy solution to these problems is to add a button, which would restrict the transfer of sensitive information unless pushed. This solved the problem of information being accessed at the wrong time, but it does not solve the problem of the wrong person accessing the information when the button is pressed. Encryption systems are currently being developed to secure RFID information from being accessed from a hacker. (Minimalist Cryptography for Low-Cost RFID Tags by Ari Juels) Privacy There are many privacy issues involving RFID technology. Most of the issues with privacy are solved by increasing the security as stated above. The most intrusive risk seems to be related to global product tracking. With an RFID tag in every product, whether its something that a person carries around or which is embedded in their clothing, this could lead to a person being easy to track. The solution to this is that products be deactivated upon purchase or consumers could use a RFID “eraser” that deactivates RFID tags only after the product has been sold. For privacy to be secured there will have to be standards set for the uniform control of readability and deactivating retail RFID tags. Cost The cost of RFID technology will vary from instance to instance. Depending on how much information the tag needs to hold, and the sensing range, RFID tags can cost from at least 20 cents each (Making the Case to Deploy RFID by Mark Leon) to $1 each. These costs could drop to a cost as low as 5 cents each in the coming years (Minimalist Cryptography for Low-Cost RFID Tags by Ari Juels). The price can be very significant when you begin thinking about adding tags to thousands of products. Also, there is the initial cost of the equipment, label makers, and readers that could make some companies hesitant to invest. 3
  13. 13. CONSUMER ANALYSIS When creating a new company it’s especially important to determine who the target audience is. If you think back to about 10 years ago, only the rich or major businessmen seemed to have cell phones. The cell phones were large and not very appealing. With this new time of technology, cell phones have changed tremendously. They are now much smaller and lighter. Cell phones come with built in cameras, internet ready capability, music and much more. So because of this revolutionary change in technology there are changes in the target audience. It is now not all that uncommon to see teenagers walking around talking on a cell phone. You might think, there just using their parent’s phones. With the many different cell phone plans out there, its much easier for a whole family to each have a cell phone. So the cell phone the teenage girl is walking with is her own. From the Consumer Reports on Cell Phones from the mysimon.com website, they reported there are now over 190 million cell-phone subscribers. That means there is more than one cell phone per household on average. The site explained that a small number of users have a cell phone as their only phone. With all the new technology being developed including RFID, a younger age group is being drawn to having cell phones. Whether being able to download music, take pictures or surf the web teenagers have no reason why they shouldn’t have a cell phone. There is however new technology such as our companies idea, like using cell phones to pay for items at retail companies and to also use your phone for a keyless entry into your home. These new ideas may bring in some consumers who are a bit older and maybe more sophisticated. Being able to purchase items at retail stores and using your phone to get into your house, as a keyless entry, would be something that’s more appealing to men and women in their 30’s and up. Having these newly added capabilities would greatly increase the number of people using cell phones. The following graph will show you the progressive growth of cell phone users over the last decade. Cell Phone Usage Growth 100 15-20 80 Percentage Curve 21-28 60 29-38 39-44 40 45-52 20 0 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 Year . 4
  14. 14. COMPETITIVE ASSESSMENT When creating a new company it’s also important to consider who would be your competitor. Our company is using RFID to enable our users to use their cell phone for retail purchases and keyless entry. So which cell phone companies are in the market today using RFID? Cell-phone manufacturers Nokia and Motorola have been working with the credit card companies to develop new wireless payment features. Oliver Steeley who is the vice president of wireless payment devices for MasterCard International says Motorola plans to introduce a payment-enabled shell for its 3220 model this spring. Cingular and Verizon Wireless are also large competitors who may not at this moment have capabilities to use RFID, but it’s only a matter of time before they do. As of now, there are no companies who are using cell phones for keyless entry. Our company would be the first to create this idea. This technology would also bring a greater market of consumers to our product instead to our other competitors. OUR PRODUCT AND WHO IT IS INTENDED FOR The Goonies Corporation is in the business of making life easier for people. We have spent tireless hours creating a RFID chip that can be inserted into your cell phone. We have focused our attention in two primary areas. The following is the research we have uncovered: Replacing your wallet with your cell phone As a United States RFID payment specialist team, we have joined together to develop, test and promote contactless payment applications with the use of cell phone technology. A report by ABI Research predicts that within a few years, as many as 50 percent of cell phones will incorporate RFID chips to enable near field communication. This Idea is a win-win for both business and consumers. The applications will allow U.S. consumers to make cashless purchases from handsets enabled with NFC. (near field communication), NFC technology uses short-range RFID transmissions that provide easy and secure communications between various devices. That means that, for example, making a reservation could be as simple as holding your phone close (less than 20 centimeters) to a poster or advertising billboard. Without ever dialing a number or speaking to anyone on the phone, you’d be able to purchase concert tickets, book hotel rooms and make other types of reservations and have these transactions charged to a credit card using account information stored in the handheld device or phone Cellular carriers view payments as a way to boost user minutes and instill customer loyalty. For credit card issuers, cell phones offer a golden opportunity to cop a share of the lucrative cash payments market. Cell phone makers need new functionality to sell more units. Merchants speed up the payment cycle without expensive equipment changes. And busy consumers save time standing in line for their lunch or latte. 5
  15. 15. “Merchants lose money by having customers stand in line,” says Sue Gordon-Lathrop, vice president of consumer products platforms for Visa International. “Waving your card or your phone really does speed things up. I watch people and, while the [smart card] chip is nice, how do you orient your card with the chip? Does it face me or the terminal? There’s a fumble factor there. With magnetic stripes, how many times have you seen someone swipe their card and it didn’t pick up the read? So there were a lot of merchant drivers toward faster consumer experience.” The card companies found another pleasant surprise during pilot testing: Contactless buyers spend more. “Our studies show that the length of time for an ExpressPay transaction is less than both cash and credit card transactions, and customers using ExpressPay increase their average transaction size 20 to 30 percent compared to cash spending,” according to American Express spokeswoman Judy Tenzer. According to Erik Michielsen, a director at ABI Research, which is based in Oyster Bay, N.Y. Manufacturers of the NFC chips would include the same companies that currently make RFID tags, labels or chips, including Philips, TI, Infineon, Sony, ASK, and Inside Contactless. ABI Research sees NFC-enabled cell phones as the initial driver in the market. Consumers can expect the first NFC-equipped handsets to come on the market in 2005. By 2009, ABI estimates that up to 50 percent of the cell phones in use will be NFC-enabled. And what do we tend to have in our hands most often these days? You guessed it. “When you start talking to people, they’ll say, ‘You know what? When I leave home, I may not have my wallet, but I do know I have my cell phone,’” says Gordon-Lathrop. Oliver Steeley, vice president of wireless payment devices for MasterCard International, agrees. “We did some research last year and consumers consistently tell us that the cell phone is the form factor that they are most interested in having PayPass in, in addition to their existing card,” he says. “So we’ve been working for some time with cell phone manufacturers to make this happen.” Cell-phone manufacturers Nokia and Motorola have been working with the credit card companies to develop new wireless payment features. Steeley says Motorola plans to introduce a payment- enabled shell for its 3220 model this spring. Several factors would seem to portend rapid adoption of contactless payment in the United States: • It works with existing mag stripe payment infrastructure. Merchants can inexpensively add on a wireless receiver or upgrade to the new point-of-service terminals that are already integrating near-field communications. Consumers will simply have a broader choice of form factors with which to pay (under consideration: pens and even earrings). • There are few security issues. Your device must touch or pass within a couple inches of the reader to complete a transaction. The process might even be more secure than a credit card. • It’s an open architecture. The card companies have agreed to standardize the protocols for radio-frequency identification in the payment arena (impress your geek friends: it’s called 6
  16. 16. ISO 14443), much as they did with the mag stripe. That means that one day, your phone, like your wallet, will contain a variety of credit accounts from which to choose; there will not be a need for a separate handset for each card brand. In Visa’s as-yet-unnamed contactless program, there would be no air minutes involved; you would power on your phone solely to enter a password or PIN number to initiate the transaction. “We strongly recommend password protection so that, if I drop my phone, you can’t pick it up and conduct payment,” says Gordon-Lathrop. “This may be sacrilegious to the card world, but that is more secure than a card transaction because if I drop my card on the ground, you could go under the floor limit (buy less-expensive items that wouldn’t flag the fraud prevention system) and still conduct payment.” Added plus for card issuers: They could load account information directly onto the handset. “In the U.S. last year, MasterCard banks sent out around 60 million credit cards through the mail. You save 20 cents postage on that alone and that’s about $12 million,” Steeley adds. Recharge the phone battery and prepare to pay. Cards won’t disappear, of course; the phone, after all, won’t fit in an ATM or be usable at nonwireless merchants. But don’t be surprised if you receive a radio-frequency-enabled card, minicard or fob from the credit card company in the next two years. The thinking is that contactless cards will catch hold first, with cell phones to follow. Wireless New Hookup Way beyond “The Clapper” is a heading that is used by The Zigbee Alliance to promote their “wireless new hookup” for the home.(www.zigbee.org) They are one of the leaders in home automation using inexpensive wireless networks. However, their network does not use RFID, instead it uses low data rate WPAN along with a SIP surge. They offer sensor chips embedded throughout your home that will deliver wireless command and control. In an article in Popular Science, they list six ways Zigbee technology will change your home. Our product offers the same wireless command and control at your fingertips through your personal cell phone. The consumer will decide what command and control they want to initiate. Using the RFID technology will eliminate the unattractive, visible sensors needed to use the Zigbee network. Our RFID cell phone product will give you the ease of entering your house just by opening your door. The consumer is not going to have to worry about finding your keys, just hold your phone near the responder and the door will open. A short wave radio frequency will be sent to the door and automatically have it unlocked by the time you turn the knob. The RFID cell phone product will allow you to continue a conversation without fumbling for your keys or interrupting your call. There are RFID door locks that are available for installation by the average homeowner, however, it does require carrying a “door card” of some type, which looks like another credit card. Our cell phone product will not add any additional cards to your wallet, but 7
  17. 17. just a simple device to your cell phone. According to Zigbee, Samsung will be investigating the possibility of installing their wireless network into their cell phones to work on the replacement of traditional door locks. (www.zigbee.org- Samsung presentation, ZigBee 2005 conference, Paris, May 2005) Our cell phone product will allow the consumer the use of both hands when entering their home, so they won’t have to make several trips to their car to bring in packages, groceries or several suitcases from a trip. They will be able to get into their home without worrying about finding or forgetting their keys. The information necessary to gain entry to their home will be in their cell phone. Most cell phone carriers have their phones attached to their belt for easy access and storage. By being in this position, they will walk beside the door lock and the door will open for them as soon as the door receives the signal from their phone. The RFID product will not disturb the normal cell phone activities. The consumer will still be able to receive and send calls, text messages, check the Internet, or use the two-way radio if available on their model of phone. Our product will enhance the use of the phone and give the consumer a greater sense of security when entering their home. They will control who can and can’t enter their home. Without proper permission, the door will not unlock. This will be a great deterrent to the average burglar because they will not have easy access to a consumer’s home. No one will be able to enter a home through normal access without the consumer’s permission. INFORMAL SURVEY Team Goonies conducted an informal survey of 50 people, at random, to get a feel for how many consumers would be willing to use these devices in their cell phones. Of those polled, almost half want to be able to make purchases using RFID technology in a cell phone. A greater percentage was willing to use RFID for keyless entry purposes. Of those surveyed who answered that they did not want to use either service, all cited security risks as the main influence for their decision. We recommend an advertising campaign that will educate our consumers about the steps we will take to make their information secure, to boost consumer interest in the services. 35 30 25 20 For 15 Against 10 5 0 Credit RFID Keyless RFID 8
  18. 18. CONCLUSION AND FINAL RECOMMENDATIONS With our product having an RFID chip in it, our consumers will be able to make their life a little easier in two ways: 1) Being able to use their cell phone at retail stores to purchase items without having to use a credit card. Consumers will not have to supply a signature, which will make the paying process much quicker for both the consumer and the retail store. Not having to use a credit card may also elevate some of the credit card fraud that consumers have to deal with. 2) Using a cell phone for a keyless entry is an untapped market that our consumers will be able to use. Taking a cell phone and using it to gain access into their home will enable a person to avoid searching for their keys and then having to find the right one. We understand and take in consideration the overall concern for cost and security. As a company we feel that this added amenity to our cell phone would bring an older target audience to our company, which then will increase our total overall sales. 9
  19. 19. WORKS CITED Collins, J. (2004, September 20) Test Set for RFID-Enabled Phones. Retrieved on November 10, 2005, from the RFID Journal Web site: http://www.the3gportal.com/cgi- bin/framer/framer.cgihttp://www.rfidjournal.com/article/articleview/1125/1/1/ Consumer Reports-Cell Phones, Retrieved on November 14, 2005, from the mysimon website: http://www.mysimon.com/ Hennig, Jan E. (2004, March 23).Preserving Privacy in RFID Deployment. Retrieved on November 14, 2005 from the Hennignetz web site : http://www.hennignetz.de/home/jhennig/rfid/preserving_privacy_in_rfid_deploy ment.html Inoue, Konomi, and Yasuura. (2002) Privacy in the Digitally Named World with RFID Tags. Retrieved on November 14, 2005 from the Berkeley web site : http://guir.berkeley.edu/pubs/ubicomp2002/privacyworkshop/papers/report.pdf Juels, Ari. Minimalist Cryptography for Low-Cost RFID Tags. Retrieved on November 14, 2005 from the RSA Laboratories web site : http://www.rsasecurity.com/rsalabs/staff/bios/ajuels/publications/minimalist/Mini malist.pdf Leon, Mark. (2004, November 1). Making the Case to Deploy RFID. Retrieved on November 15, 2005 form the Information Week web site : http://informationweek.com/shared/printableArticle.jhtml?articleID=51201886 Mcdonald, J. (2005, March 28) Paying by cell phone on the way. Retrieved on November 10, 2005, from the Bankrate.com Web site: http://www.bankrate.com/brm/news/cc/20050329a1.asp Mclver, Rich. (2005, March 22). How RFID Will Impact Consumer Privacy. Retrieved on November 15, 2005 from the RFID Gazette web site : http://www.rfidgazette.org/2005/03/rfid_privacy_is.html O’Connor, Mary Catherine. (2005, April 13). RFID and the Media Revolution. Retrieved on November 14, 2005 from the RFID Journal web site : http://www.rfidjournal.com/article/articleview/1508/1/1/ Schechner, B. (2004, June 23) Near Field Communications coming to a handset near you. Retrieved on November 10, 2005, from the Web site: http://www.abiresearch.com/abiprdisplay.jsp?pressid=149 10

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