Truth in Technologies 2004: RFID and Bar Coding Annual Meeting and First AIDC 100 Open Forum Charles  Wang  Center AIDC 100
8:30 -  9:00 Networking Continental Breakfast 9:00 -  9:10   Welcome and Introductions   RICHARD MEYERS   Chairman AIDC 10...
1:15 -  2:00 Implementing RFID in a 3PL Environment  JIM DEAN Third Party Synchronization  Manager of Supply Chain,   Ener...
Paul and Elisabeth Bergé got everyone started in the right direction! What a team!
Kathy Smith, OSD Steve Braun, Hospira John Hill, ESYNC Dr. Daniel Engels, M.I.T. Let the festivities begin! Mark Reboulet,...
Dick Pocek and Jim Dean, Energizer Craig Harmon QED Systems Richard Rees, Scanology John Greaves, Deloitte Mark Roberti RF...
Speaker Wall of Fame Dr. Yacov Shamash Vice President, Stony Brook University John Hill Principal, ESYNC Dr. Daniel Engels...
Speaker Wall of Fame Dick Pocek Director Logistics, Energizer Jim Dean Manager Supply Chain, Energizer Richard Rees Presid...
Steve Lambright,  Vice President Savi Technology Kevin Jost,  President & CEO Hand Held Products Tom Miller,  President & ...
This forum attracted more than 100 who turned out to be a very attentive and involved audience!
Dr. John Hamilton, St. Louis University during a special luncheon session
Bar Codes Expected To Have A Long Life   October 21, 2004   Despite all the noise about the impact of radio-frequency iden...
For its November RFID test, the Air Force has purchased 5,000 class 0 tags from Matrics Inc. to put on boxes shipped from ...
Group  Dinner for 60 AIDC 100
Karen, Mike and Mark just chillin’ out! Elisabeth  has Kevin’s attention!
Sprague is trying to collect from Mike! Sure looks like everything is ok! Larry and Don feel no pain, but not sure about C...
Now here are some very happy people!
 
The dinner must have been good! What magic was Mark performing?
Thank you one and all!
Leadership Council dinner-meeting on October 19th
Leadership Council dinner-meeting on October 19th
Oh… We also worked at our annual meeting on October 21 st ! Tom Miller and Dan Mullen of AIM presenting a proposed relatio...
 
 
Members in Attendance Sprague Ackley David Allais Francis Beck Paul Bergé Chuck Biss Rick Bushnell David Collins Gabriele ...
<ul><li>Promotion/Publicity </li></ul><ul><li>Rick Bushnell </li></ul><ul><li>Rick Morgan </li></ul><ul><li>Gabriele Edgel...
Special thanks to Bonney and  Gabrielle
A TON of kudus to Teddy for all of the food arrangements and to Robbi for all of the wonderful photographs.
Jason Torre University Archivist Special Collections Department & University Archives Frank Melville, Jr. Memorial Library...
George Goldberg &quot;The AIDC 100 is an important voice for automatic identification and data collection, both for member...
Truth in Technologies 2005: RFID and Bar Coding Put October 26-27, 2005 on your calendar! Charles  Wang  Center AIDC 100
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October 2004 Forum

  1. 1. Truth in Technologies 2004: RFID and Bar Coding Annual Meeting and First AIDC 100 Open Forum Charles Wang Center AIDC 100
  2. 2. 8:30 - 9:00 Networking Continental Breakfast 9:00 - 9:10 Welcome and Introductions RICHARD MEYERS Chairman AIDC 100 9:10 - 9:15 Welcome Dr. YACOV SHAMASH Vice President Economic Development, Stony Brook University 9:15 - 10:00 DoD RFID Policy KATHY SMITH Implementation Details OSD Supply Chain Integration Office for DoD 10:00 - 10:45 RFID Passive Label Test Project MARK REBOULET USAF AIT-PMO Chief The pilot will demonstrate the ability of a prototype EPC (Electronic Product Code) Class 0 passive RFID Military Shipping Label (MSL) to automatically record transportation event transactions, 10:45 - 11:00 Break 11:00 - 11:45 Creating Successful RFID Implementation Programs STEVEN BRAUN Marketing Manager, Hospira Worldwide Program Definition and How Key Elements Will be Identified 11:45 - 12:00 Moderator Summary Dr. DANIEL ENGELS Director Auto I.D. Labs, M.I.T. JOHN HILL Principal, ESYNC 12:00 - 1:10 Networking Lunch and Luncheon Speaker 12:40 - 1:10 Business Strategy and the RFID Challenge Dr. JOHN HAMILTON Assistant Professor, Management Associate Director, Consortium for Supply Chain Management The John Cook School of Business, St. Louis University Wednesday October 20, 2004 AIDC 100 Morning Session
  3. 3. 1:15 - 2:00 Implementing RFID in a 3PL Environment JIM DEAN Third Party Synchronization Manager of Supply Chain, Energizer Holdings & Integration Planning DICK POCEK Director of Logistics, Energizer Holdings 2:00 - 2:45 Panel: Is EPC Really Global? RICHARD REES An International Perspective President, Scanology; Boxmeer, The Netherlands - Current non-UHF Installed Base JOHN GREAVES - Euro Power & Spectrum Limitations Deloitte Global RFID Technology Integration - The Future 2:45 - 3:30 The Emperor Has No Clothes! CRAIG HARMON President Q.E.D. Systems A review of contentious and real-world compliance issues - Both commercial and government 3:30 - 4:00 Networking Break 4:00 - 5:00 Executive Technology Provider Perspective: TOM MILLER Panel Discussion and Attendee Participation President, Intermec Technologies - Are we ready? MICHAEL LOWRY - Technology barriers President & CEO, Lowry Computer Products - Lessons learned KEVIN JOST President & CEO, Hand Held Products STEPHEN LAMBRIGHT Sr. Vice President, Savi Technology 5:00 - 5:15 Editorial Summary MARK ROBERTI Founder and Editor, RFID Journal 5:15 Wrap Up RICHARD MEYERS Chairman AIDC 100 Afternoon Session AIDC 100
  4. 4. Paul and Elisabeth Bergé got everyone started in the right direction! What a team!
  5. 5. Kathy Smith, OSD Steve Braun, Hospira John Hill, ESYNC Dr. Daniel Engels, M.I.T. Let the festivities begin! Mark Reboulet, USAF Dr. Yacov Shamash Stony Brook University
  6. 6. Dick Pocek and Jim Dean, Energizer Craig Harmon QED Systems Richard Rees, Scanology John Greaves, Deloitte Mark Roberti RFID Journal
  7. 7. Speaker Wall of Fame Dr. Yacov Shamash Vice President, Stony Brook University John Hill Principal, ESYNC Dr. Daniel Engels Director, Auto ID Labs, M.I.T. Kathy Smith Special Assistant, OSD Mark Reboulet Chief, USAF AIT-PMO Steve Braun Marketing Manager, Hospira
  8. 8. Speaker Wall of Fame Dick Pocek Director Logistics, Energizer Jim Dean Manager Supply Chain, Energizer Richard Rees President, Scanology John Greaves Consultant, Deloitte Dr. John Hamilton Assistant Professor, St. Louis University Mark Roberti Founder & Editor, RFID Journal Craig Harmon President, QED Systems
  9. 9. Steve Lambright, Vice President Savi Technology Kevin Jost, President & CEO Hand Held Products Tom Miller, President & CEO Intermec Technologies Mike Lowry, President & CEO Lowry Computer Products Steve Lambright Vice President Savi Technology Kevin Jost President & CEO Hand Held Products Mike Lowry President & CEO Lowry Computer Products Tom Miller President Intermec Technologies Wall of Fame Panel
  10. 10. This forum attracted more than 100 who turned out to be a very attentive and involved audience!
  11. 11. Dr. John Hamilton, St. Louis University during a special luncheon session
  12. 12. Bar Codes Expected To Have A Long Life October 21, 2004 Despite all the noise about the impact of radio-frequency identification technology on retailers and their suppliers, well-entrenched bar codes will continue to play a vital role for many years. That was the consensus of executives attending a &quot;Truth in Technologies 2004: RFID and Bar Codes&quot; conference at Stony Brook University on Long Island Wednesday, which was hosted by the AIDC 100, a nonprofit organization of automatic identification and data capture professionals. For nearly 10 years, the U.S. Department of Defense has been using Savi Technology Inc.'s active RFID tags on freight containers, consolidated air pallets, and large engine containers shipped to its sites. Active tags, unlike passive tags, have batteries built into them. Now, as part of a mandate that takes effect in January, the Defense Department is asking its suppliers to affix passive RFID tags on cases and pallets they ship to key receiving sites, the Defense Distribution San Joaquin center in California, and the Defense Distribution Susquehanna center in Pennsylvania. The department wants to take advantage of RFID's benefits, including the fact that RFID tags can be re-used and don't have to be positioned directly under scanners, in line-of-sight positions, to be read. Nonetheless, the Defense Department says it will continue to use bar-code technology. &quot;We feel that bar codes have done a good job so far, but we want the re-usable read/write capabilities and the automated visibility that isn't possible with bar codes,&quot; said Kathy Smith, special assistant of the Office of the Secretary of Defense Supply Chain Integration office with the Department of Defense. &quot;However, bar codes aren't going away; we'll just be using RFID in cases where line of site is questionable, where read/write is required, where unattended scanning is desired, and during simultaneous reading and identification of multiple tags.&quot; Smith told conference attendees that the Defense Department will require that two-dimensional bar codes be used on military shipping labels in addition to the RFID tags on cases and pallets. Two-dimensional bar codes are more advanced than traditional bar codes. They can store more characters and don't require line-of-sight readings. By 2007, the Defense Department will require these bar codes on unique items such as circuit boards, critical parts, and on items valued at $5,000 or more, Smith said. All three technologies--active RFID tags, passive RFID tags, and two-dimensional bar codes--will complement each other, Smith said. Similar to the Department of Defense, the U.S. Air Force has been tagging freight containers with active RFID tags at the Military Ocean Terminal at Sunny Point, N.C., for the past three years. Although active RFID tags have proven successful, Mark Reboulet, automated identification technology manager of the Air Force Material Command, said it's unclear how active RFID tags will behave in the ammunition environment. The Air Force will begin a project on Nov. 8 to test passive RFID. But the Air Force isn't going to depend solely on RFID. &quot;Our hand-held readers will have a bar-code capability and every RFID label will have a readable bar code in the back of it. So, if an RFID tag fails, we will have a bar code to fall back on,&quot; he said.
  13. 13. For its November RFID test, the Air Force has purchased 5,000 class 0 tags from Matrics Inc. to put on boxes shipped from the U.S. to a base in Germany, where readers have been installed. Reboulet said the Air Force is only purchasing 5,000 class 0 tags because it plans to use next-generation RFID tags instead, as soon as they're available . Energizer Holdings Inc. is working with its third-party logistics provider, Exel Logistics, part of NFC plc, to implement RFID. Although Energizer has seen success with class 0 and class 0+ tags, the company isn't expecting to see a return on its RFID investment for a long time, Dick Pocek, director of logistics at Energizer, told conference attendees. Energizer won't change its use of bar codes near term, he said, and the company's internal projects will continue as scheduled, using bar codes. &quot;As we move product down the conveyer line, we want to verify that the RFID tag is a working tag and verify it against our bar codes, which unlike RFID, have proven to be 100% successful,&quot; said Pocek. While the Air Force and Energizer see RFID and bar codes as co-existing technologies, Hospira Worldwide Inc., a specialty pharmaceuticals and medication-delivery company, is still making a transition from linear bar codes to reduced-space symbology (RSS) bar codes and said it isn't ready for RFID. Traditionally, Hospira has used standard UCC.EAN-128 linear bar codes, but they're too large to fit on injectable and intravenous-solution products. The company recently adopted the newer reduced-space symbology for bar-coding those types of products because it allows all information to fit in an area as small as a pen cap. The technology has been successfully tested; now Hospira must replace drug codes on injectable and I.V. solution products with RSS. In the health-care industry, RFID may be useful for patient identification and for locating pumps, equipment, and drugs. But there are plenty of hurdles. RF waves could interfere with equipment such as pacemakers, and RFID tags can't always be read through liquid solutions, said Steven Braun, marketing manager at Hospira. RFID tags still cost too much, and the health-care industry, known to lag behind others when it comes to IT, may not be prepared for such a leading-edge technology as RFID. &quot;Hospitals aren't ready to adopt RFID from a financial perspective and because of the hospital IT infrastructure. They're barely ready for bar-coding,&quot; said Braun. &quot;I see in 10 to 20 years bar-coding still being used at hospitals, as opposed to RFID.&quot; A complete transition to RFID will take between 10 and 15 years, according to Dr. John Hamilton, assistant professor of management and management information systems at the John Cook School of Business at St. Louis University. That means companies implementing the technology will need to make important strategic decisions and not look at RFID simply as the technology that will solve supply-chain problems. &quot;RFID implementation will take a long time, which means bar codes aren't going away. They both must co-exist in order to serve different user needs,&quot; Hamilton said. Richard Meyers, Chairman of the AIDC 100, agreed. Companies implementing RFID shouldn't look for ways to replace bar codes with RFID, he told conference attendees. Instead, they should identify the supply-chain problem and select the technology that best solves that problem. &quot;I don't see an end date for the use of bar-coding,&quot; he said. &quot;Bar codes are a viable, cheap technology driven by standards and unless standards change, bar codes will remain.&quot; by Elena Malykhina
  14. 14. Group Dinner for 60 AIDC 100
  15. 15. Karen, Mike and Mark just chillin’ out! Elisabeth has Kevin’s attention!
  16. 16. Sprague is trying to collect from Mike! Sure looks like everything is ok! Larry and Don feel no pain, but not sure about Chuck!
  17. 17. Now here are some very happy people!
  18. 19. The dinner must have been good! What magic was Mark performing?
  19. 20. Thank you one and all!
  20. 21. Leadership Council dinner-meeting on October 19th
  21. 22. Leadership Council dinner-meeting on October 19th
  22. 23. Oh… We also worked at our annual meeting on October 21 st ! Tom Miller and Dan Mullen of AIM presenting a proposed relationship with the AIDC 100.
  23. 26. Members in Attendance Sprague Ackley David Allais Francis Beck Paul Bergé Chuck Biss Rick Bushnell David Collins Gabriele Edgell Jim Fales Allan Gilligan Teddy Goldberg Mike Guillory Craig Harmon Peter Hicks John Hill Clive Hohberger Chris Hook Cliff Horwitz Jack Householder Chris Kapsambelis Tom Kirkham Robert LaMoreaux Mike Lowry Chuck Mara Brian Marcel Dick Meyers Mike Ohanian Mark Reboulet Richard Rees Larry Roberts Bob Rylander Dick Sawyer Bonney Shuman Mike Weaver Ted Williams Bruce Wray George Wright IV George Wright Sr.
  24. 27. <ul><li>Promotion/Publicity </li></ul><ul><li>Rick Bushnell </li></ul><ul><li>Rick Morgan </li></ul><ul><li>Gabriele Edgell </li></ul><ul><li>Flyer Production/Distribution </li></ul><ul><li>Rick Bushnell </li></ul><ul><li>Gabriele Edgell </li></ul><ul><li>Paul Bergé </li></ul><ul><li>Mementos </li></ul><ul><li>Bonnie Shuman </li></ul><ul><li>Paul Bergé </li></ul><ul><li>Dave Allais </li></ul><ul><li>Attendance </li></ul><ul><li>Rick Bushnell </li></ul><ul><li>Dick Sawyer </li></ul><ul><li>Bruce Wray </li></ul><ul><li>Logistics </li></ul><ul><li>Stony Brook University </li></ul><ul><li>- Jason Torre </li></ul><ul><li>Kristen Nyitray </li></ul><ul><li>Meal Planning </li></ul><ul><li>Teddy Goldberg </li></ul>Conference Materials Paul Bergé Treasury Sprague Ackley Minutes LC Meeting = Larry Roberts Forum (Notes) = John Hill Annual Meeting = Bonnie Shuman Photography Teddy Goldberg Robbi Goldberg Bus Organization Chuck Biss David Allais Sponsors Paul Bergé Website Larry Roberts Registration Paul Bergé Larry Roberts The Team That Made It Happen! AIDC 100
  25. 28. Special thanks to Bonney and Gabrielle
  26. 29. A TON of kudus to Teddy for all of the food arrangements and to Robbi for all of the wonderful photographs.
  27. 30. Jason Torre University Archivist Special Collections Department & University Archives Frank Melville, Jr. Memorial Library Stony Brook University For an outstanding job, AIDC 100
  28. 31. George Goldberg &quot;The AIDC 100 is an important voice for automatic identification and data collection, both for members who are grappling with changing standards and implementation challenges, and for businesses that need these technologies and are looking for an unbiased source of information. I look forward to collaborating with the other members to help the business community better understand how these technologies can help them cut costs and implement efficient supply chain management.“ Cliff Horwitz, Member of AIDC 100 A man with vision! 1925 - 2003
  29. 32. Truth in Technologies 2005: RFID and Bar Coding Put October 26-27, 2005 on your calendar! Charles Wang Center AIDC 100
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