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 Ed 656 visualization and literacy
 Ed 656 visualization and literacy
 Ed 656 visualization and literacy
 Ed 656 visualization and literacy
 Ed 656 visualization and literacy
 Ed 656 visualization and literacy
 Ed 656 visualization and literacy
 Ed 656 visualization and literacy
 Ed 656 visualization and literacy
 Ed 656 visualization and literacy
 Ed 656 visualization and literacy
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Ed 656 visualization and literacy

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  • 1. Visualization and Literacy
  • 2. Literacy is the ability to encode and decode meaning using the culture’s symbol systems
  • 3. . Students must become literate with their culture’s symbol systems
  • 4. Visualization can form the basis for creative and critical thinking.
  • 5. Visual symbol systems offer unique ways of knowing.
  • 6. Allows students to think broadly – allows for use of multiple intelligences.
  • 7. . Fosters Memory and uses emotion
  • 8.   Visualization can be used for learning as students construct images to represent knowledge.  
  • 9.   Visual literacy includes the ability to think, learn, and express oneself in terms of images.
  • 10. . Visual literacy includes the ability to deconstruct images. It can be used to construct and represent knowledge
  • 11. • Gambrell, L.B., & Bales, R.J. (1986). Mental imagery and the comprehension-monitoring performance of fourth- and fifth-grade poor readers. Reading Research Quarterly, 21(4), 454–464. doi:10.2307/747616 •   • Gambrell, L.B., & Koskinen, P.S. (2002). Imagery: A strategy for enhancing comprehension. In C.C. Block & M. Pressley (Eds.), Comprehension instruction: Research-based best practices (pp. 305–318). New York: Guilford. •   • Braden, R.A., & Hortin, J.A. (1982). Identifying the theoretical foundations of visual literacy. Journal of Visual/Verbal Language, 2(2), 37–42. •   • Long, T. (2008). The full circling process: Leaping into the ethics of history using critical visual literacy and arts- based education. Journal of Adolescent and Adult literacy, 51(6), 498-508. •   • ONeill. K. (2011). Reading pictures: Developing visual literacy for greater comprehension. The Reading Teacher, 65(3), 214-22. •   • Sadowski, M. & Paivio, A. (2001). Imagery and text: A dual coding theory of reading and writing. Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum •   • Sarafini. F. (2011). Expanding Perspectives for Comprehending Visual Images in Multimodal Texts. Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy, 54(5), 342-250. •   •   • Wilhelm, J. (2004). Reading is seeing: Learning to visualize scenes, characters, ideas, and text worlds to improve comprehension and reflective reading. New York: Scholastic.

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