STRATEGICPLAN2009–2012DECEMBER2009STRATEGICPLAN2009–2012DECEMBER2009
TABLE
OF
CONTENTS
PAGE
LIST
OF
ABBREVIATIONS
AND
ACRONYMS
...................................................................
PLAN
................................................................................
.....3
1.6
ORGANIZATION
OF
THE
PLAN....
CURRENT
INSTITUTIONAL
STRUCTURE
................................................................................
............
.................... 28
CHAPTER
SEVEN:
INSTITUTIONAL
STRUCTURE
..............................................................
LIST
OF
ABBREVIATIONS
AND
ACRONYMS
AGOA
–
African
Growth
and
Opportunity
Act
AIDS
–
Acquired
Immune
Deficiency
Syndrome
CE...
FEWA
–
Fund
for
the
Education
of
Women
of
Africa
HR
–
Human
Resource
HIV
–
Human
Immunodeficiency
Virus
ICT
–
Information
...
–
Kenya
Integrated
Household
Baseline
Survey
KIPI
–
Kenya
Industrial
Property
Institute
KIRDI
–
Kenya
Industrial
Research
...
National
Environment
Management
Authority
PPOA
–
Public
Procurement
Oversight
Authority
SACCO
–
Savings
and
Credit
Co-oper...
FOREWORD
The
launch
of
the
first
Women
Enterprise
Fund
Strategic
Plan
covering
the
period
2009
–
2012
is
an
important
mile...
institution
that
will
play an
instrumental
and
effective
role
in
women
empowerment
and
gender
equality.
The
strategic
plan...
of
the
final
document.
Potential
development
partners
were
constructively
engaged
to
enable
them
articulate
their
possible...
markets
and
linkages
with
big
companies.
These
challenges
are
accentuated
by inhibitive
cultural
practices
that
consign
wo...
It
can
no
longer
be
business
as
usual
but
rather
–business
unusual
approach–.
Greater
success
and
satisfaction
is
derived
...
to
ones
destination.
Institutional
strengthening
of
the
Fund
in
terms
of
legal
independence,
staffing
and
automation
are
a...
The
Fund
will
therefore
pursue
a
business
partnership
model
with
like-minded
partners
to
mobilize
financial,
technical
and...
faith.
I
am
confident
that
the
board,
management
and
other
stakeholders
have
what
it
takes
to
make
this
noble
idea
work
in...
of
women
empowerment
and
gender
equality.
In
our
life
time
we
can
enable
millions
of
women
to
work
their
way
out
of
povert...
-2012
PREFACE
The
Women
Enterprise
Fund
is
a
unique
institution
in
several
ways,
namely:
(a)
its
very existence
as
a
government
...
of
the
3rd
Millennium
Development
Goal
on
women
empowerment
and
gender
equity,
(d)
targeting
of
women
who
constitute
sligh...
as
the
principal
funding
agency,
tax
payers,
local
and
international
partners.
The
Advisory Board
and
management
have
to
w...
organizations
to
actualize
their
dream
of
improved
sustainable
livelihoods
and
gender
equality through
the
interventions
t...
on
creating
a
robust,
lean,
efficient
and
sustainable
organization
that
is
BUILT
TO
LAST.
The
formulators
and
implementers...
ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
The
formulation
of
this
Strategic
Plan
has
been
very participative.
The
final
product
is
the
collective
wi...
being
the
1st
strategic
plan
for
the
–young–
institution,
it
is
appropriate
to
acknowledge
by
names
the
great
Kenyans
who
...
namely,
Judith
Kibaki,
Grace
Ngala,
Elizabeth
Kimenyi,
Prof.
Collette
Suda,
Anne
Waiguru,
Esther
Maiyo,
Wambua
Kilonzo,
Ru...
Muyumbu,
Lydia
Mwadime,
Edmund
Ndumbi,
Robert
Kinge,
Flora
Mbae,
Kiprono
Cheruiyot,
Charles
Kibocha,
Zablon
Mwangai,
Lilia...
Consultants,
Samuel
Kibe
and
Harada
Kyoko
–
Japan
International
Cooperation
Agreement
(JICA),
Dr.
Jankan
M.
Gutu
–
Tips
Ma...
and
last
but
not
least,
Mary
Frances
Lukera
–
Federation
of
Women
Lawyers
(FIDA
–
Kenya).
The
following
institutions
had
d...
Strategic
Plan
2009
-2012
Gender
Commission,
Women
Political
Alliance,
Federation
of
Women
Lawyers
(FIDA
–
Kenya)
and
UNIFEM.
The
consultants,
M/s
V...
sharpened
and
focused
the
content
in
the
plan.
The
role
of
the
secretariat
in
this
process
was
instrumental
in
its
success...
EXECUTIVE
SUMMARY
The
Women
Enterprise
Fund
(the
Fund)
was
established
through
Legal
Notice
No.
147:
Government
Financial
...
of
providing
loans
to
women
using
the
two
channels,
namely,
micro-finance
institutions
(MFIs)
and
the
Ministry of
Gender,
...
Fund
developed
its
vision
and
mission
statements,
and
the
core
values.
The
vision
of
the
fund
is
–tosocial
llyandeconomica...
A
situational
analysis
was
undertaken
to
evaluate
the
past
performance
of
the
Fund,
identify the
strengths,
weaknesses,
op...
services.
2.
Full
operationalization
of
the
other
mandates
of
the
Fund.
3.
Strengthening
the
institutional
capacity.
4.
Op...
To
grow
the
Fund
from
Kshs.
1.215
billion
to
Kshs.
3
billion
by the
year
2012.
3.
To
increase
the
number
of
women
entrepre...
facilitate
marketing
of
products
and
services
of
women
enterprises
in
local
and
international
markets.
7.
To
facilitate
de...
identified.
In
addition,
the
implementing
actors,
the
time
frame
and
expected
impacts
were
specified.
These
have
been
docu...
CHAPTER
ONE
INTRODUCTION
1.1
BACKGROUND
The
Women
Enterprise
Fund
(WEF)
is
an
initiative
of
the
government
and
was
establi...
Notice
No.147
is
to
undertake
the
following:
i.
Provide
loans
to
credible
micro-finance
institutions
(MFIs),
registered
no...
iii.
Support
women
oriented
micro,
small
and
medium
enterprises
to
develop
linkages
with
large
enterprises;
iv.
Facilitate...
at
creating
a
globally competitive
and
prosperous
country
with
a
high
quality of
life
by the
year
2030.
The
Vision
2030
is...
Plan
2009
-2012
1
–
Science,
technology and
innovation;
–
Land
reform;
–
Human
resource
development;
–
Security;
and
–
Public
sector
reforms...
by
making
fundamental
changes
in
four
areas,
namely:
opportunity,
empowerment,
capabilities
and
vulnerabilities.
These
cha...
help
correct
gender
gaps
in
access
to
and
control
of
resources,
economic
opportunities,
power,
and
political
voice.
These
...
Vision
2030
also
has
the
establishment
and
institutionalisation
of
Women
Enterprise
Fund
as
one
of
the
flagship
projects.
...
community.
The
Fund
therefore,
has
an
important
role
to
play in
the
realisation
of
the
Vision
2030
and
the
medium
term
goa...
to
women
entrepreneurs,
including
capacity building
and
facilitation
of
access
to
business
linkages
among
others.
1.3
RATI...
WEF
Strategic
Plan
(2009-2012)
has
been
necessitated
by the
need
to
focus
on
sustainable
outcomes
and
to
provide
a
framewo...
2030
and
the
Medium
Term
Plan
goals
and
objectives.
1.4
KEY
ASSUMPTIONS
In
the
development
of
the
strategic
plan,
the
foll...
d.
Economic
growth
prospects
will
improve.
e.
There
will
be
political
stability
and
security in
the
country.
1.5
METHODOLO...
and
representatives
of
the
development
partners.
Specifically the
following
methodology was
used:
1.5.1
Document
review
Wo...
Various
documents
were
reviewed
for
the
purposes
of
extracting
relevant
information
for
use
in
the
Strategic
Plan.
These
d...
e.
WEF
Rapid
Assessment
Report
2009;
f.
Recommendations
for
Enhancing
the
Policy
and
Regulatory Framework
for
the
Women–s
...
Women
Enterprise
Development
Fund
appraisal
report
2009,
by FIDA
Kenya;
and
l.
Other
relevant
documents.
1.5.2
Pre-worksho...
Advisory
Board,
staff
and
selected
representatives
of
WEF
partners.
A
one-day
validation
workshop
was
also
held
with
a
wid...
Chapter
one
is
the
introduction,
which
covers
the
Fund–s
background,
its
role
towards
Vision
2030,
the
rationale
for
strat...
provides
the
institutional
review
covering
the
core-business,
clients
and
services,
vision,
mission,
core
values
and
the
c...
the
implementation
matrix,
which
covers
for
each
of
the
strategic
objectives,
the
strategies,
impacts,
activities,
impleme...
CHAPTER
TWO
CONCEPTUAL
FRAMEWORK
2.1
ECONOMIC
STATUS
OF
WOMEN
IN
KENYA
For
a
long
time,
the
contribution
of
women
in
econo...
laws
in
Kenya
discriminate
against
women
(e.g.
the
customary law)
when
it
comes
to
inheritance
of
property.
The
female
gen...
hostility and
move
away from
their
homes
to
live
in
abject
poverty.
This
makes
them
face
economic
difficulties,
especially...
in
the
country.
These
disparities
may be
attributed
to
various
factors,
among
them,
societal
beliefs
and
practices.
Many w...
employment
may
be
attributed
to
low
education
attainment
and
is
one
of
the
reasons
for
disparities
in
income.
The
report
f...
2.2
STRATEGIC
POSITIONING
OF
THE
WEF
The
establishment
of
Women
Enterprise
Fund
is
a
positive
step
towards
ensuring
resour...
target
women
entrepreneurs.
This
is
being
undertaken
through
two
main
operational
channels,
namely the
Ministry of
Gender,...
rate
per
annum
on
reducing
balance.
The
loans
disbursed
through
the
Ministry channel
attract
a
5%
one-off
administrative
f...
women
face
in
venturing
and
growing
sustainable
enterprises.
The
Fund
is
expected
to
contribute
to
poverty reduction
and
e...
development
support
services.
It
must
however
be
noted
that
reliance
on
government
funding
alone
may
not
enable
the
Fund
a...
The
Fund,
as
is
currently constituted
under
the
Financial
Regulations,
faces
constraints
that
may
hinder
the
attainment
of...
ministry’s
field
staff
who
are
not
directly
accountable
to
the
Fund.
These
officers
have
their
regular
core
duties
while
t...
parties
and
deliver
on
its
mandates.
Women
Enterprise
Fund
Strategic
Plan
2009
-2012
8
CHAPTER
THREE
INSTITUTIONAL
REVIEW
3.1
CORE
BUSINESS
The
core
business
of
the
Fund
is
derived
from
its
mandate
as
stipulat...
will
enable
them
contribute
to
national
development.
3.2
CLIENTS
AND
SERVICES
The
Fund
has
categorised
Kenyan
women
entrep...
entrepreneurs
The
Fund
targets
both
women
entrepreneurs
and
potential
women
entrepreneurs
at
different
levels
of
the
pyram...
The
clients
to
be
targeted
for
funds
channeled
through
the
constituencies
are
women
entrepreneurs
and
/or
potential
women
...
channelled
through
the
MFIs
target
women
entrepreneurs
operating
small
and
medium
enterprises
who
would
like
to
borrow
as
...
enterprises
oriented
infrastructure
Facilitation
of
investment
in
micro,
small
and
medium
enterprises
oriented
infrastruct...
large
enterprises
will
be
aimed
at
linking
the
woman
entrepreneur
to
large
enterprises
where
she
can
have
access
to
techno...
enterprises
by
way of
creating
awareness
of
and
promoting
the
products
and
services
both
in
the
local
and
international
ma...
small
quantities.
Women
Enterprise
Fund
Strategic
Plan
2009
-2012
10
Capacity building
will
target
both
internal
and
external
customers.
Internal
customers
include
the
Advisory Board,
WEF
sec...
further
create
awareness
through
enhanced
networking.
3.3
VISION
Our
vision
is:
Tosocial
llyandeconomical
llyempowerKenyan...
and
probity in
dealing
with
our
stakeholders.
3.5.2
Teamwork
In
the
discharge
of
WEF’s
mandate,
we
will
embrace
teamwork
a...
Women
Enterprise
Fund
Strategic
Plan
2009
-2012
11
In
WEF,
we
believe
it
is
possible
to
break
the
vicious
cycle
of
poverty facing
the
country through
women
empowerment
and
w...
is
currently managed
through
the
following
institutions:
3.6.1
The
Advisory
Board
The
Advisory Board
is
responsible
for
ov...
and
Industry;
’
Permanent
Secretary,
Ministry of
Agriculture;
’
Permanent
Secretary,
Ministry of
Planning,
National
Develo...
responsible
for
the
following
duties:
’
Supervise
and
control
the
administration
of
the
Fund;
’
Consult
with
the
Advisory ...
’
Prepare
a
statement
of
accounts
relating
to
the
Fund
and
showing
the
expenditure
incurred
from
the
Fund
in
respect
of
ea...
Controller
and
Auditor
General
in
accordance
with
the
provisions
of
the
Public
Audit
Act,
2003;
and
’
Open
and
operate
a
b...
’
Create
awareness
on
the
funds
disbursement
procedures
and
requirements;
and
’
Assist
in
the
mobilization,
selection,
ide...
representative
of
the
Local
Authority in
the
Division/District;
’
A
representative
of
one
active
local
NGO
in
the
Division...
2009
-2012
13
These
are
ministry officials
who
reach
the
various
women
entrepreneurs
at
the
constituency level
on
behalf
of
the
Fund.
Th...
Micro
Finance
Institutions
These
are
WEF
business
partners
who
assist
in
distribution
of
funds.
The
funds
distributed
thro...
CHAPTER
FOUR
SITUATIONAL
ANALYSIS
4.1
EVALUATION
OF
PAST
PERFORMANCE
A
review
of
the
Fund’s
performance
was
undertaken
in
...
results
are
as
follows:
4.1.1
Allocation
of
funds
As
at
30th
June,
2009,
the
amount
of
funds
received
by
WEF
had
been
allo...
1:
Allocation
of
funds
Some
of
the
amount
allocated
to
the
financial
intermediaries
was
not
disbursed
due
to
delay in
furn...
’
Lack
of
awareness
of
the
Fund.
Given
that
it
was
the
first
year
of
operation,
many women
were
still
not
aware
of
the
exi...
system
that
resulted
in
much
time
being
taken
in
communicating
between
the
different
levels
of
the
Fund
thus
causing
delay...
to
community mobilization
were
also
applied
on
the
development
of
the
Fund’s
logo
and
the
official
launch
of
the
Fund.
Mos...
were
met
by the
Fund.
4.1.2
Beneficiaries
of
loans
disbursed
The
funds
disbursed
through
the
constituencies
were
lent
to
w...
enterprises
had
benefited
from
the
funds
loaned
through
the
financial
intermediaries’
channel.
4.1.3
Progress
made
on
the
...
There
has
been
insignificant
progress
made
in
the
attainment
of
the
other
four
mandates
of
the
Fund
as
depicted
in
the
tab...
business
incubators
that
will
be
beneficial
to
women
enterprises.
Nil
3
Support
women
oriented
micro,
small
and
medium
ent...
disbursement
In
reviewing
the
performance
of
the
two
channels,
it
has
been
established
that
the
MFI
channel
may
not
reach
...
that
WEF
funds
are
accessed
by the
targeted
women
entrepreneurs
and
at
the
agreed
terms
and
conditions.
The
Ministry chann...
staff
to
ov
ersee
the
loaning
process.
It
relies
on
the
Divisional
Women
Enterprise
Fund
Committees
(DWEFC),
who
may not
h...
Strategic
Plan
2009
-2012
17
4.2
INTERNAL
ENVIRONMENT
Analysis
of
the
internal
environment
identifies
factors
within
the
organization
that
may influenc...
group
of
women
entrepreneurs.
iv.
Ability of
the
Fund
to
recruit
and
engage
financial
intermediaries
that
have
technical
c...
the
parent
ministry for
some
of
its
operations.
This
also
inhibits
its
ability to
contract
with
third
parties.
ii.
Insuffi...
of
a
fully operationalised
risk
management
framework.
vi.
Insufficient
funds
to
have
significant
impact
even
after
full
op...
18
4.3
EXTERNAL
ENVIRONMENT
Analysis
of
the
external
environment
identifies
factors
outside
the
control
of
the
organization
t...
gender
policy in
place.
iii.
Existing
organized
and
registered
self
help
groups.
iv.
Existence
of
institutions
offering
te...
markets,
decent
work
sheds
and
business
solution
centres.
vi.
Existence
of
trading
blocks
and
treaties
like
the
East
Afric...
to
poor
loan
repayment.
ii.
Impact
of
HIV/AIDS
and
other
pandemics
leading
to
frequent
collapse
of
enterprises
and
diversi...
especially
in
the
rural
and
semi
urban
areas.
vi.
Women
enterprises
engaging
in
activities
that
are
detrimental
to
the
env...
closed
down
by National
Environment
Management
Authority (NEMA)
or
other
government
agencies.
vii.
Climatic
changes
and
na...
that
when
women
are
empowered
gender
based
violence
may
increase
and
destabilise
families.
x.
Competition
from
other
organ...
organization.
WEF
has
many stakeholders
in
its
core
functions.
Some
of
the
key stakeholders
include:
4.4.1
Women
entrepren...
an
obligation
to
repay
their
loans
according
to
the
agreement
with
the
Fund.
4.4.2
The
government
The
government
is
the
ma...
Gender,
Children
and
Social
Development,
provincial
administration
and
Ministry of
Finance
in
the
discharge
of
its
mandate...
20
4.4.3
Financial
intermediaries
MFIs
play a
major
role
in
the
disbursement
of
loans
to
the
Fund’s
target
group.
A
portion
o...
its
mandate,
the
Fund
recognizes
the
role
played
by the
development
partners.
Most
of
its
operations
require
collaboration...
Fund
should
partner
with
the
private
sector
in
spearheading
women
enterprise
development.
In
particular,
there
is
need
to
...
hence
their
welfare
is
of
utmost
importance.
WEF
is
committed
to
adopting
best
practices
in
management
of
its
staff
to
ens...
to
time.
4.4.8
Research
and
academic
institutions
The
Fund
is
key in
facilitating
information
dissemination
on
matters
aff...
access
to
relevant
information
and
emerging
issues
affecting
the
operations
of
women
enterprises.
Research
and
academic
in...
women.
They
also
offer
a
platform
to
lobby for
favourable
policies
and
regulations.
4.4.10
Community
leadership
The
struct...
Women
Enterprise
Fund
Strategic
Plan
2009
-2012
22
CHAPTER
FIVE
STRATEGIC
FRAMING
5.1
BUSINESS
MODEL
The
business
model
to
be
used
to
reach
the
targeted
women
with
different...
time
to
time
bearing
in
mind
the
risks,
capacity,
efficiency and
desirable
impact.
WEF
intends
to
recruit
volunteers
at
co...
directly through
grassroot
based
organisations.
In
this
regard,
the
Fund
will
explore
the
possibilities
of
mobilizing
and
...
its
operations,
WEF’s
funding
will
initially come
from
government
and
development
partners.
However,
in
the
long
run
its
f...
Fund
intends
to
collaborate
with
development
partners,
private
sector
and
training
institutions,
and
work
together
with
ot...
5.2
STRATEGIC
THEMES
Strategic
themes
are
the
key
areas
of
performance
for
an
organization
in
a
given
time
period.
The
fol...
by
commercial
banks
and
MFIs.
Approximately 40%
of
all
Kenyan
women
have
no
access
to
finance
at
all;
another
40%
have
acc...
sustainable,
it
has
to
mobilize
enough
funds
for
continuous
lending.
It
is
therefore
vital
to
scale
up
the
size
of
the
Fun...
development,
facilitation
of
marketing
and
linkages
with
large
organisations)
need
to
be
fully operationalised
in
order
fo...
financial
management
and
business
management
to
enhance
business
sustainability and
growth.
Women’s
access
to
markets
for
...
Fund
Strategic
Plan
2009
-2012
24
In
addition,
women
need
to
be
assisted
in
forming
business
associations
and
networks
to
exchange
ideas,
gain
access
to
bus...
initiatives
and
provision
of
decent,
secure
and
safe
market
sheds
or
work
spaces.
5.2.3
Strengthening
the
institutional
ca...
are
reluctant
to
engage
with
the
Fund
since
its
legal
status
is
not
permanent
nor
certain.
There
is
therefore
need
to
stre...
Fund.
In
addition,
employees
should
be
equipped
with
the
necessary skills
as
a
way of
enhancing
productivity and
motivatio...
financial
institution
and
thus
adequate
processes
and
ICT
systems
are
necessary to
enhance
effective
and
efficient
operati...
Fund
Strategic
Plan
2009
-2012
25
5.3
STRATEGIC
OBJECTIVES
AND
STRATEGIES
The
following
are
the
strategic
objectives
and
respective
strategies
under
each
of...
loan
products
and
other
products
2.
To
grow
the
Fund
from
Kshs.
1.215
billion
to
Kshs.
3
billion
by
the
year
2012
i.
Advoc...
with
the
MFIs
to
ensure
funds
channelled
through
them
reach
targeted
women
ii.
Use
financial
institutions
and
organization...
large
enterprises
on
the
products
and
services
by
women
entrepreneurs
iii.
Facilitate
subcontracting
programme
between
wom...
partners
in
training
3.
To
facilitate
marketing
of
products
and
services
of
women
owned
enterprises
in
local
and
internati...
space
in
the
constituency
markets
v.
Advocate
for
allocation
of
at
least
30%
of
government’s
procurements
to
women
entrepr...
4.
To
facilitate
development
of
supportive
infrastructure
for
women
enterprises
i.
Seek
development
partners
to
incubate
f...
HR
capacity,
organization
structure
and
governance
structure
of
the
Fund
iii.
Build
necessary
infrastructure
to
support
th...
operational
processes,
policies
&
procedures
ii.
Enhance
information
management
system
iii.
Put
in
place
a
functional
moni...
CHAPTER
SIX
IMPLEMENTATION
PLAN
Theme
1:
Financial
Services
Objective
1:
To
increase
the
loan
portfolio
from
the
current
K...
the
financial
partners
(
i)
Hold
discussions
with
the
financial
partners
aimed
at
leveraging
the
fund
(
ii)
Enter
into
MOU...
products
that
meet
the
needs
of
the
target
women
entrepreneurs
April
2010
August
2010
and
continuous
CEO/
Operations
Manag...
Objective
2:
To
grow
the
Fund
from
Kshs.
1.215
billion
to
Kshs.
3
billion
by
the
year
2012
Strategy
Impact
(s)
Activity
Ti...
next
three
years
to
the
relevant
allocation
from
ministries
the
government
(
ii)
Hold
discussions
with
the
January
2010
&
...
to
’
the
identified
partners
Enhance
risk
Minimal
resources
(
i)
Develop
&
implement
risk
June
2010
CEO/Operations
Operati...
iv)
Prepare
quarterly
reports
on
the
performance
of
revolving
fund
Quarterly
Credit
Officer
/Finance
&
Administration
Mana...
Objective3:
To
increase
the
number
of
women
entrepreneur
borrowers
from
92,000
to
over
600,000
by
2012
Strategy
Impact
(
s...
agreeing
on
policies
that
ensure
the
loans
reach
the
target
women
(
ii)
Implement
the
policies
agreed
on
with
the
MFIs
(
i...
institutions
and
to
women
with
branches
at
grassroot
level
Operations
Manager
budget
organizations
with
entrepreneurs
in
a...
which
funds
could
be
disbursed
to
the
women
(
iv)
Advocate
for
privatization
of
the
Fund
with
the
formed
women
association...
Theme
2:
Full
Operationalization
of
the
Other
Mandates
of
the
Fund
Objective
1:
To
link
at
least
60
women
micro,
small
and...
&
service
demonstrations/
shows
by
large
enterprises
to
women
entrepreneurs
July
2010
and
continuous
CEO/
Marketing
&
Rese...
June
2010
CEO/
Marketing
&
13
million
information
to
of
women
selling
the
women
enterprises
in
the
Research
Manager
large
...
entrepreneurs
using
internet,
TV
and
Radio
programmes
and
WEF
website
December
2010
and
continuous
CEO/
Marketing
&
Resear...
Strategy
Impact
(s)
Activity
Time
Frame
Implementing
Actors
Resources
(Shs)
Facilitate
subcontracting
programme
between
wo...
quarterly
December
2010
December
2010
and
continuous
CEO/
Marketing
&
Research
Manager/
ICT
Officer
10
million
Facilitate
...
their
products
and
services
December
2010
and
continuous
Continuous
’
CEO/
Marketing
&
Research
Manager
million
Women
Ente...
Objective
2:
To
enhance
and
strengthen
the
knowledge,
skills
and
capacity
of
women
entrepreneurs
Strategy
Impact
(
s)
Acti...
province
June
2010
July
2010
and
continuous
CEO/
Marketing
&
Research
Manager/
Training
Officer
’
5
million
(
iii)
Impleme...
modules/curriculum
in
partnership
with
development
partners
April
2010
’
(
iii)
Identify
development
partners
to
sponsor
t...
Strategy
Impact
(
s)
Activity
Time
Frame
Implementing
Actors
Resources
(Kshs)
Involvement
of
financial
institutions
and
ot...
Monitor
the
training
of
women
entrepreneurs
undertaken
by
the
trainers
November
2009
and
continuous
”
”
CEO/
training
Offi...
Objective
3:
To
facilitate
marketing
of
products
and
services
of
women
owned
enterprises
in
local
and
international
market...
information
to
them
(
ii)
Link
women
beneficiaries
to
marketing
organizations
e.
g.
EPC,
FEWA
Immediate
and
continuous
”
C...
2010
and
continuous
Encourage
women
entrepreneurs
to
organize
themselves
into
marketing
groups
or
companies
Better
prices/...
CEO/
Marketing
&
Research
Manager
CEO/
Marketing
&
Research
Manager/Training
Officer
million
Women
Enterprise
Fund
Strateg...
Facilitate
provision
of
market
information
to
women
entrepreneurs
Informed
women
entrepreneurs
(
i)
Gather
&
compile
marke...
for
women
entrepreneurs
to
be
allocated
space
Increased
involvement
of
women
entrepreneurs
in
(
i)
Investigate
women
entre...
women
entrepreneurs
Hold
discussions
with
PPOA
and
other
relevant
bodies
aimed
at
revising
the
procurement
regulations
to
...
Objective
4:
To
facilitate
development
of
supportive
infrastructure
of
women
enterprises
Strategy
Impact
(s)
Activity
Time...
with
the
identified
institutions
to
incubate
the
enterprises
February
2010
&
continuous
March
2010
and
continuous
CEO/
Mar...
Venture
into
public-private
partnerships
aimed
at
developing
markets
for
women
entrepreneurs
December
2009
and
continuous
...
Theme
3:
Strengthening
the
Institutional
Capacity
Objective1:
To
strengthen
institutional
capacity
of
the
Fund
Strategy
Im...
HR
capacity,
organization
structure
and
governance
structure
of
the
Fund
Adequate
human
resources
and
structures
for
effec...
(
v)
Engage
and
train
volunteers
in
every
constituency
through
an
internship
programme
(
vi)
Develop
HR
policies
and
schem...
”
”
”
”
”
HR
Officer/Training
Officer
million
Women
Enterprise
Fund
Strategic
Plan
2009
-
2012
38
Strategy
Impact
(s)
Activity
Time
Frame
Implementing
Actors
Resources
(Kshs)
Build
the
necessary
infrastructure
to
support...
Fund
Immediate
Immediate
April
2010
CEO/Operations
Manager/
Finance
Administration
Manager
CEO/Operations
Manager/ICT
offi...
Strategic
Plan
2009
-
2012
39
Objective
2:
To
enhance
advocacy
and
publicity
of
the
Fund
targeting
all
stakeholders
Strategy
Impact
(s)
Activity
Time
Fr...
i)
Place
advertisements
in
daily
newspapers,
radios
and
TVs
(
ii)
Develop
and
distribute
fliers
on
the
products
of
the
Fun...
v)
Develop
WEF
website
(
vi)
WEF
to
participate
in
local
and
international
forums
related
to
its
mandate,
e.
g.
internatio...
Manager/
ICT
officer
CEO/
Marketing
&
Research
Manager
22
million
Women
Enterprise
Fund
Strategic
Plan
2009
-
2012
40
Theme
4:
Operational
Processes
and
Systems
Objective:
To
enhance
efficiency
in
the
operations
and
processes
of
the
Fund
St...
processes,
policies
&
procedures
(
iii)
Develop
a
service
charter
of
the
Fund
(
iv)
Decentralize
verification
of
loan
appl...
/ICT
Officer/
Credit
Officer
5.5
million
Enhance
information
management
system
Efficient
and
effective
flow
of
information...
by
financial
partners
to
report
on
the
status
of
loans
disbursement
December
2009
Operations
Manager/Credit
Officer
Women
...
StrategyImpact(
s)
ActivityTimeFrameImplementingActorsResources(
Kshs)
Putinplaceafunctionalmonitoringandevaluationframewo...
CHAPTER
SEVEN
INSTITUTIONAL
STRUCTURE
7.1
ADVISORY
BOARD
The
Advisory Board
is
responsible
for
overseeing
the
management
o...
discharging
its
role:
7.1.1
Audit
and
risk
committee
The
audit
and
risk
committee”s
role
is
to
assist
the
Board
in
the
eff...
i.
The
annual
financial
reporting
process
and
accounting
policies
for
the
Fund;
ii.
The
scope
of
the
Fund”s
internal
audit...
The
effectiveness
of
the
processes
used
by
management
to
monitor
and
ensure
compliance
with
laws,
regulations,
ethical
gui...
-2012
43
7.1.2
Loans
approval
committee
The
loans
approval
committee
is
charged
with
the
responsibility of
overseeing
the
allocatio...
the
Advisory Board
when
desirable;
iii.
Review
and
approve
or
disapprove
loan
applications
for
amounts
determined
by the
B...
the
system
of
remuneration
and
benefits
for
the
staff.
The
Committee
shall
review
and
provide
recommendations
to
the
Advis...
direct
reports;
v.
Remuneration
policies;
vi.
The
professional
development
of
Directors,
the
Chief
Executive
Officer
and
D...
7.2
CHIEF
EXECUTIVE
OFFICER
The
Chief
Executive
Officer
shall
ensure
proper
and
efficient
management
of
the
Fund
under
the...
the
Fund”s
initiatives
in
sourcing
of
finances
for
various
programmes
and
overseeing
their
application;
v.
Promoting
posit...
Department;
5.
Legal
Department.
The
functions
of
these
departments
are
explained
below:
7.3.1
Operations
Department
The
O...
Women
Enterprise
Fund
Strategic
Plan
2009
-2012
45
vi.
Offer
financial
advisory services
to
beneficiaries;
vii.
Take
necessary action
to
recover
overdue
loans;
and
viii.Perf...
procedures,
rules
and
regulations;
ii.
Undertaking
promotions
and
publicity campaigns
and
establishment
of
market
networks...
for
training
and
research
interventions
in
the
Fund;
vii.
Ensuring
production
of
quality research
reports;
viii.
Facilitat...
other
external
parties;
xiii.
Overseeing
preparation
of
the
Fund
publications
such
as
newsletters,
calendars
and
articles
...
7.3.3
Finance
and
Administration
Department
The
Finance
and
Administration
Department
will
be
responsible
for
the
followin...
Fund”s
commitments
and
contractual
obligations;
vi.
Preparation
of
all
financial
reports
in
accordance
with
the
relevant
r...
and
services
for
WEF
in
accordance
with
the
applicable
laws;
xii.
Ensuring
proper
custody of
records,
resources
and
mainte...
functions
of
the
Finance
and
Administration
Department
as
approved
by the
Advisory Board.
7.3.4
Audit
Department
The
Audit...
-2012
47
iv.
Monitoring
and
evaluating
processes
and
procedures
of
loan
approvals,
disbursement,
usage,
repayment
and
banking
of
ca...
x.
Carrying
out
compliance
tests
on
various
aspects
of
operations
against
the
laid
down
internal
control
systems;
xi.
Ensu...
Strategic plan wef 2009 2012
Strategic plan wef 2009 2012
Strategic plan wef 2009 2012
Strategic plan wef 2009 2012
Strategic plan wef 2009 2012
Strategic plan wef 2009 2012
Strategic plan wef 2009 2012
Strategic plan wef 2009 2012
Strategic plan wef 2009 2012
Strategic plan wef 2009 2012
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Strategic plan wef 2009 2012

  1. 1. STRATEGICPLAN2009–2012DECEMBER2009STRATEGICPLAN2009–2012DECEMBER2009
  2. 2. TABLE OF CONTENTS PAGE LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS AND ACRONYMS ................................................................................ ............. II FOREWORD ................................................................................ ................................................................ III PREFACE......................................................................... .............................................................................. V ACKNOWLEDGEMENT................................................................. .............................................................. VI EXECUTIVE SUMMARY......................................................................... ................................................... VIII CHAPTER ONE: INTRODUCTION ................................................................................ .............................. 1 1.1 BACKGROUND ................................................................................ ...........................................................1 1.2 THE ROLE OF WEF TOWARDS VISION 2030 ................................................................................ ..........1 1.3 RATIONALE FOR THE STRATEGIC PLAN ................................................................................ ...............3 1.4 KEY ASSUMPTIONS ................................................................................ ....................................................3 1.5 METHODOLOGY OF DEVELOPING THE
  3. 3. PLAN ................................................................................ .....3 1.6 ORGANIZATION OF THE PLAN............................................................................ ....................................4 CHAPTER TWO: CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK....................................................................... .................. 6 2.1 ECONOMIC STATUS OF WOMEN IN KENYA ................................................................................ .........6 2.2 STRATEGIC POSITIONING OF THE WEF............................................................................. ...................7 CHAPTER THREE: INSTITUTIONAL REVIEW ................................................................................ ........... 9 3.1 CORE BUSINESS ................................................................................ .........................................................9 3.2 CLIENTS AND SERVICES ................................................................................ ...........................................9 3.3 VISION.......................................................................... ..............................................................................11 3.4 MISSION ................................................................................ .....................................................................11 3.5 CORE VALUES.......................................................................... .................................................................11 3.6
  4. 4. CURRENT INSTITUTIONAL STRUCTURE ................................................................................ ...........12 CHAPTER FOUR: SITUATIONAL ANALYSIS ................................................................................ ............ 15 4.1 EVALUATION OF PAST PERFORMANCE ................................................................................ ..............15 4.2 INTERNAL ENVIRONMENT ................................................................................ ....................................18 4.3 EXTERNAL ENVIRONMENT ................................................................................ ...................................19 4.4 STAKEHOLDER ANALYSIS ................................................................................ ......................................20 CHAPTER FIVE: STRATEGIC FRAMING ................................................................................ ................... 23 5.1 BUSINESS MODEL ................................................................................ ....................................................23 5.2 STRATEGIC THEMES ................................................................................ ...............................................24 5.3 STRATEGIC OBJECTIVES AND STRATEGIES ................................................................................ .......26 CHAPTER SIX: IMPLEMENTATION PLAN............................................................................
  5. 5. .................... 28 CHAPTER SEVEN: INSTITUTIONAL STRUCTURE ................................................................................ .. 43 7.1 ADVISORY BOARD ................................................................................ ...................................................43 7.2 CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER ................................................................................ ..................................45 7.3 DEPARTMENTS ................................................................................ .........................................................45 CHAPTER EIGHT: MONITORING AND EVALUATION...................................................................... ...... 50 8.1 OBJECTIVES OF MONITORING AND EVALUATION ..........................................................................50 8.2 M&E FRAMEWORK ................................................................................ ..................................................50 i Women Enterprise Fund Strategic Plan 2009 -2012
  6. 6. LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS AND ACRONYMS AGOA – African Growth and Opportunity Act AIDS – Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome CEO – Chief Executive Officer COMESA – Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa C-WES – Constituency Women Enterprise Scheme DWEFC – Divisional Women Enterprise Fund Committee EFT – Electronic Fund Transfer EPC – Export Promotion Council EPZA – Export Processing Zones Authority
  7. 7. FEWA – Fund for the Education of Women of Africa HR – Human Resource HIV – Human Immunodeficiency Virus ICT – Information and Communication Technology JICA – Japan International Co-operation Agency JKUAT – Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology KEBS – Kenya Bureau of Standards KGT – Kenya Gatsby Trust KIBT – Kenya Institute of Business Training KIE – Kenya Industrial Estate KIHBS
  8. 8. – Kenya Integrated Household Baseline Survey KIPI – Kenya Industrial Property Institute KIRDI – Kenya Industrial Research and Development Institute MDGs – Millennium Development Goals MFI – Micro-Finance Institutions MOU – Memorandum Of Understanding MSE – Micro and Small Enterprises MSED – Micro and Small Enterprises Development M&E – Monitoring and Evaluation MTP – Medium Term Plan NGOs – Non Governmental Organizations NEMA –
  9. 9. National Environment Management Authority PPOA – Public Procurement Oversight Authority SACCO – Savings and Credit Co-operative SAGA – Semi Autonomous Government Agency SMEP – Small & Micro Enterprise Programme SWOT – Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats UNDP – United Nations Development Programme WEF – Women Enterprise Fund ii Women Enterprise Fund Strategic Plan 2009 -2012
  10. 10. FOREWORD The launch of the first Women Enterprise Fund Strategic Plan covering the period 2009 – 2012 is an important milestone in the life of the nascent institution that was established in August, 2007 and commenced operations in 2008. As a pioneer board, we are in an enviable position of providing a shared vision and laying a solid foundation for an
  11. 11. institution that will play an instrumental and effective role in women empowerment and gender equality. The strategic plan provides the clear path that we will pursue towards this bigger noble goal. The formulation of this plan involved a broad cross-section of stakeholders both from within the parent ministry and externally. The consultative process which begun in July 2009 was aimed at ensuring ownership
  12. 12. of the final document. Potential development partners were constructively engaged to enable them articulate their possible areas of future support. The Fund–s mandates capture the perennial challenges that have chained women to poverty through marginalization or exclusion from access to economic resources and opportunities. This include access to credit, business development support services like capacity building, decent and secure market infrastructure, information on
  13. 13. markets and linkages with big companies. These challenges are accentuated by inhibitive cultural practices that consign women to the periphery of the formal economy. The enormity of tasks facing the Fund in terms of scope, depth and diversity of women (nb. there are various levels of exclusion depending on a woman–s level of education, ethnicity, religion, marital status, age, etc) calls for innovative, creative and holistic solutions.
  14. 14. It can no longer be business as usual but rather –business unusual approach–. Greater success and satisfaction is derived when one achieves disproportionate results using minimal resources. The strategic plan for the period sets out very clear goals and strategies that will be implemented in execution of the Fund–s legal mandates. We are cognizant of the fact that a robust vessel is critical in getting
  15. 15. to ones destination. Institutional strengthening of the Fund in terms of legal independence, staffing and automation are a priority. Given the difficult times the country is going through as a result of the global economic meltdown, the drought and famine affecting more than ten million Kenyans, resources flow from the government may not be guaranteed. iii Women Enterprise Fund Strategic Plan 2009 -2012
  16. 16. The Fund will therefore pursue a business partnership model with like-minded partners to mobilize financial, technical and other forms of support. We believe that the partnership approach will provide us with the necessary leverage to achieve greater impact. The achievement of the ambitious targets in this plan will require sacrifice, self-discipline, determination, commitment, focus, integrity, smart work and a good dose of
  17. 17. faith. I am confident that the board, management and other stakeholders have what it takes to make this noble idea work in an effective and sustainable manner in empowering women. To conclude, my clarion call is for each one of us, individually and collectively to rededicate ourselves to the realization of goals set in this plan, which are critical building blocks to the grand objective
  18. 18. of women empowerment and gender equality. In our life time we can enable millions of women to work their way out of poverty through this Fund and by so doing we will have created prosperous families, hence our motto, –you empower a woman, you empower a family and a whole nation–. Ms.RoseN.Ogega,MBS Chairperson iv Women Enterprise Fund Strategic Plan 2009
  19. 19. -2012
  20. 20. PREFACE The Women Enterprise Fund is a unique institution in several ways, namely: (a) its very existence as a government agency goes against the traditional best international practice in microfinance, which is private sector or NGO driven, (b) its high ranking as a flagship project in the country–s Vision 2030 development blueprint, (c) it–s a demonstration of Kenya–s international commitment to the achievement
  21. 21. of the 3rd Millennium Development Goal on women empowerment and gender equity, (d) targeting of women who constitute slightly over 50% of the Kenyan population, but nonetheless have been marginalized from accessing economic resources and opportunities for myriad reasons, e.g. institutional, cultural and structural factors. The foregoing factors set very high expectations on the Fund–s performance from key stakeholders, mainly, the women clients, the government
  22. 22. as the principal funding agency, tax payers, local and international partners. The Advisory Board and management have to work hard and smartly to not only meet these expectations but surpass them if the Fund is to remain relevant in the crowded arena of microfinance and women empowerment. Given the many decades of marginalization of women, it will require concerted, focused and coordinated efforts from like minded
  23. 23. organizations to actualize their dream of improved sustainable livelihoods and gender equality through the interventions to be delivered through the Fund–s mandates. The three year strategic plan which has been aligned with the government–s Medium Term Plan (2008-2012) and Vision 2030 sets out strategic objectives, strategies, activities and the resources required to implement them. As the first substantial planning effort, emphasis is placed
  24. 24. on creating a robust, lean, efficient and sustainable organization that is BUILT TO LAST. The formulators and implementers of this plan owe it to the future generations to live the spirit of women empowerment and gender equality. S. T. Wainaina Chief Executive/Director v Women Enterprise Fund Strategic Plan 2009 -2012
  25. 25. ACKNOWLEDGEMENT The formulation of this Strategic Plan has been very participative. The final product is the collective wisdom of many stakeholders that included both institutions and individuals who sacrificed their time to participate in meetings, research work on the Fund, read through many documents, and provide constructive critique and feedback. To all of them we will for ever be indebted. This
  26. 26. being the 1st strategic plan for the –young– institution, it is appropriate to acknowledge by names the great Kenyans who have made it possible to produce the document: the Advisory Board has spent long hours in various committees to make sure the plan captures the spirit envisioned by the founders of this dream. The Chairperson Madam Rose N. Ogega provided visionary leadership to her team members
  27. 27. namely, Judith Kibaki, Grace Ngala, Elizabeth Kimenyi, Prof. Collette Suda, Anne Waiguru, Esther Maiyo, Wambua Kilonzo, Rukia Subow, Amy Ndungu and Katherine Muoki. The following officers and institutions provided insightful ideas during the process, The Permanent Secretary, Ministry of Gender, Children and Social Development, Dr. James W. Nyikal, Anne Muturi, Esther Ndirangu, Mutea Rukwaru, Lukas Nkumbuku, George G. Jilo, Ben Makotsi, Florence Mburu, Monica Wegulo, Caroline
  28. 28. Muyumbu, Lydia Mwadime, Edmund Ndumbi, Robert Kinge, Flora Mbae, Kiprono Cheruiyot, Charles Kibocha, Zablon Mwangai, Lilian Olunga, Rhoda Odhiambo, Tom Onyina, Agnes Oriri, Rodgers Waliaula, John Kairianja, Charles Mogoba, Jane Obiero, Kenya Industrial Estates (KIE), Ministry of Lands, Kenya Industrial Research and Development Institute (KIRDI), Mr. Kent Noel and Sam Gakunga – Educational Development Center (EDC), Mercy Rurii – IDRC, Dunstan Ngumo – Intellectual Capital
  29. 29. Consultants, Samuel Kibe and Harada Kyoko – Japan International Cooperation Agreement (JICA), Dr. Jankan M. Gutu – Tips Management, L.W. Waithaka – Export Promotions Council (EPC), Francis Muema amd Ben Kiragu – Kenya Gatsby Trust, Benson Kimithi – International Labour Organisation (ILO), Wanjiku Wakigi – HBF, Margaret Mbugua and Esther Wanjau – Women Political Alliance (Kenya), Stella Morange – United Nations Fund for Women (UNIFEM),
  30. 30. and last but not least, Mary Frances Lukera – Federation of Women Lawyers (FIDA – Kenya). The following institutions had done some research work on the Fund and their findings and recommendations were very useful in clarifying the thinking on how to position the Fund to be an effective instrument of promoting women empowerment and gender equality; The National vi Women Enterprise Fund
  31. 31. Strategic Plan 2009 -2012
  32. 32. Gender Commission, Women Political Alliance, Federation of Women Lawyers (FIDA – Kenya) and UNIFEM. The consultants, M/s VAS Consultants Ltd led by the team leader Mirie Mwangi, worked tirelessly in guiding the Board and management in the process. Their unwavering support and commitment made the long journey a delightful learning experience. We cannot forget the role Betty Maina played during the validation session, it
  33. 33. sharpened and focused the content in the plan. The role of the secretariat in this process was instrumental in its success. The Secretary, Gloria and otherstaffmembersspentlonghoursplanningthediscussionmeetings,invitations,securin gmeetingvenues,coordinatingfeedback,etc. Lastbutnotleast,wearegratefultoourAlmighty Godforgivingusthishistoricopportunity tochartthedestiny ofthisGREATINSTITUTIONTHATISBUILTTOLASTintheserviceofsocially andeconomically empoweringKenyanwomenentrepreneursforthenationaldevelopmentofourbelovedcountry,K enya. S.T.WainainaChiefExecutive/Director vii Women Enterprise Fund Strategic Plan 2009 -2012
  34. 34. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The Women Enterprise Fund (the Fund) was established through Legal Notice No. 147: Government Financial Management (Women Enterprise Fund) Regulations, 2007 and began its operations in December 2007. The Fund was officially launched by His Excellency the President on 26th May 2009. It has five mandates as provided in the establishing legal notice. The Fund has operationalised the mandate
  35. 35. of providing loans to women using the two channels, namely, micro-finance institutions (MFIs) and the Ministry of Gender, Children & Social DevelopmentundertheConstituency WomenEnterpriseScheme(C- WES).Theotherfourmandateshavenotyetbeensignificantlyoperationalised.Theseareasfo llows: i.Attractingandfacilitationofinvestmentinmicro,smallandmediumenterprisesoriented infrastructuresuchasbusinessmarketsorbusinessincubatorsthatwillbebeneficialtowom enenterprises; ii.Supportingwomenorientedmicro,smallandmediumenterprisestodeveloplinkageswithla rgeenterprises; iii.Facilitationofmarketingofproductsandservicesofwomenenterprisesinbothdomestic andinternationalmarkets;andiv.Supportingcapacity buildingofthebeneficiariesoftheFundandtheirinstitutions. Developmentofastrategicplantherefore,becamenecessary toenabletheFundimproveonthedelivery ofitsmandateaswellasdealwithemergingchallengesintheoperatingenvironment.Thestrat egicplanwasdevelopedthroughaparticipatory approach,whichensuredthatviewsofthekey stakeholderswereincorporated.Theparticipationwasthroughdiscussions,consultations anda two-day workshop with the key stakeholders. The final draft was subjected to a one-day validation process by a wider stakeholders– group. Having reviewed its mandate, the
  36. 36. Fund developed its vision and mission statements, and the core values. The vision of the fund is –tosocial llyandeconomical llyempowerKenyanwomen entrepreneursforeconomicdevelopment–. The mission of the Fund is –tomobiliseresourcesandofferaccesstoaf ffordablecreditand businesssupportservicestowomenentrepreneurs. viii Women Enterprise Fund Strategic Plan 2009 -2012
  37. 37. A situational analysis was undertaken to evaluate the past performance of the Fund, identify the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats and hence isolate the key strategic themes that require intervention. The strategic themes formed the basis for setting objectives of the Fund for the next three years and strategies that would enable the achievement of the objectives. The strategic themes are: 1. Financial
  38. 38. services. 2. Full operationalization of the other mandates of the Fund. 3. Strengthening the institutional capacity. 4. Operational processes and systems. To deal with these issues, the Fund set ten objectives that would assist in the attainment of its mission. These are: 1. To increase the loan portfolio from the current Kshs. 682 million to Kshs. 4 billion by the year 2012. 2.
  39. 39. To grow the Fund from Kshs. 1.215 billion to Kshs. 3 billion by the year 2012. 3. To increase the number of women entrepreneur borrowers from 92,000 to over 600,000 by 2012. 4. To link at least 60 women micro, small and medium enterprises in each province with large enterprises by 2012. 5. To enhance and strengthen the knowledge, skills and capacity of women entrepreneurs. 6. To
  40. 40. facilitate marketing of products and services of women enterprises in local and international markets. 7. To facilitate development of supportive infrastructure for women enterprises 8. To strengthen institutional capacity of the Fund. 9. To enhance advocacy and publicity of the Fund. 10. To enhance efficiency in the operations and processes of the Fund. To enable the achievement of these objectives, strategies and the appropriate activities for each strategy were
  41. 41. identified. In addition, the implementing actors, the time frame and expected impacts were specified. These have been documented in an implementation plan presented in chapter six of this strategic plan. A monitoring and evaluation framework that will help ensure successful implementation of the strategic plan has also been provided. ix Women Enterprise Fund Strategic Plan 2009 -2012
  42. 42. CHAPTER ONE INTRODUCTION 1.1 BACKGROUND The Women Enterprise Fund (WEF) is an initiative of the government and was established through Legal Notice No. 147: Government Financial Management (Women Enterprise Fund) Regulations, 2007. WEF operations began in December 2007 while its official launch by His Excellency the President was on 26th May 2009. The mandate of the Fund as stipulated in the Legal
  43. 43. Notice No.147 is to undertake the following: i. Provide loans to credible micro-finance institutions (MFIs), registered non-governmental organisations (NGOs) involved in micro financing, and savings and credit co-operative organisations (SACCOs) for on-lending to women enterprises; ii. Attract and facilitate investment in micro, small and medium enterprises oriented infrastructure such as business markets or business incubators that will be beneficial to women enterprises;
  44. 44. iii. Support women oriented micro, small and medium enterprises to develop linkages with large enterprises; iv. Facilitate marketing of products and services of women enterprises in both domestic and international markets; v. Support capacity building of the beneficiaries of the Fund and their institutions. 1.2 THE ROLE OF WEF TOWARDS VISION 2030 The Vision 2030 is the new long-term development blueprint for Kenya which aims
  45. 45. at creating a globally competitive and prosperous country with a high quality of life by the year 2030. The Vision 2030 is anchored on three key pillars, namely Economic Pillar, Social Pillar and Political Pillar. These pillars are anchored on the following foundations: – Macroeconomic stability; – Continuity in governance reforms; – Enhanced equity and wealth creation opportunities for the poor; – Infrastructure; – Energy; Women Enterprise Fund Strategic
  46. 46. Plan 2009 -2012 1
  47. 47. – Science, technology and innovation; – Land reform; – Human resource development; – Security; and – Public sector reforms. The Vision 2030 is to be realized through the implementation of medium term plans with the first Medium Term Plan (MTP) covering the period 2008 – 2012. The goal of the government in the Vision 2030 regarding women is to reduce gender disparities
  48. 48. by making fundamental changes in four areas, namely: opportunity, empowerment, capabilities and vulnerabilities. These changes are aimed at increasing women–s access to education, training, capital and other productive resources. In addition, the government aims to remove all obstacles that hinder women–s contribution to national development. Under the Social Pillar in the Vision 2030, specific policy measures have been identified that when implemented would
  49. 49. help correct gender gaps in access to and control of resources, economic opportunities, power, and political voice. These include: – Gender mainstreaming in government policies, plans, budgets and programmes; and – Affirmative action for 30% representation of women in all decision making levels. The Vision 2030 has identified increasing access to funds and training of women entrepreneurs as a flagship project. The
  50. 50. Vision 2030 also has the establishment and institutionalisation of Women Enterprise Fund as one of the flagship projects. The Fund is expected to: – Provide Kenyan women with access to alternative financial services aimed at positively impacting on family welfare and increase the estimated earned incomes; and – Strengthen women–s voices and bargaining power within the home as well as in the wider
  51. 51. community. The Fund therefore, has an important role to play in the realisation of the Vision 2030 and the medium term goals through facilitating access to finance and other business development services Women Enterprise Fund Strategic Plan 2009 -2012 2
  52. 52. to women entrepreneurs, including capacity building and facilitation of access to business linkages among others. 1.3 RATIONALE FOR THE STRATEGIC PLAN Strategic planning is the process by which an organization develops the most desirable vision of the future, taking into account the constraints within which it is likely to operate and determines how it can realize that vision. The development of
  53. 53. WEF Strategic Plan (2009-2012) has been necessitated by the need to focus on sustainable outcomes and to provide a framework of long–term goals and outcomes to guide annual work plans of the Fund. Directing the Fund–s activities towards achieving specific outcomes will help in accomplishing the most out of limited resources. Further, strategic planning gives the Fund the opportunity to align its programmes with the Vision
  54. 54. 2030 and the Medium Term Plan goals and objectives. 1.4 KEY ASSUMPTIONS In the development of the strategic plan, the following key assumptions were made; that: a. WEF will be legally independent so as to unlock or free the Fund to work. b. Key personnel will be recruited to handle the core mandates of the Fund. c. There will be adequate resources.
  55. 55. d. Economic growth prospects will improve. e. There will be political stability and security in the country. 1.5 METHODOLOGY OF DEVELOPING THE PLAN A participatory strategic planning process was used to ensure ownership of the strategic plan by the stakeholders and enhance effective and efficient implementation of the plan. The process entailed involvement of the Ministry of Gender, Children and Social Development, the Fund Advisory Board, WEF staff
  56. 56. and representatives of the development partners. Specifically the following methodology was used: 1.5.1 Document review Women Enterprise Fund Strategic Plan 2009 -2012 3
  57. 57. Various documents were reviewed for the purposes of extracting relevant information for use in the Strategic Plan. These documents included: a. The Government Financial Management (Women Enterprise Fund) Regulation, 2007, legal notice 147; b. The guidelines for the Women Enterprise Fund; c. The Ministry of Gender, Children and Social Development Strategic Plan; d. The organizational structure and staff establishment of the Fund;
  58. 58. e. WEF Rapid Assessment Report 2009; f. Recommendations for Enhancing the Policy and Regulatory Framework for the Women–s Enterprise by the Women Political Alliance-Kenya 2009; g. Documents from Divisional Women Enterprise Fund Committees (DWEFC); h. Strategic Planning guidelines from the Ministry of Planning, National Development and Vision 2030; i. The Kenya Vision 2030 and the Medium Term Plan; j. Strategic Plan of Youth Enterprise Development Fund; k.
  59. 59. Women Enterprise Development Fund appraisal report 2009, by FIDA Kenya; and l. Other relevant documents. 1.5.2 Pre-workshop interviews Discussions were held with the Ministry of Gender, Children and Social Development officials, the Advisory Board and WEF staff. 1.5.3 Strategic planning workshops To incorporate the views of key stakeholders and in order to enhance ownership of the strategic plan, a two-day workshop was held with the
  60. 60. Advisory Board, staff and selected representatives of WEF partners. A one-day validation workshop was also held with a wider stakeholders– group. 1.6 ORGANIZATION OF THE PLAN This Strategic Plan consists of eight chapters: Women Enterprise Fund Strategic Plan 2009 -2012 4
  61. 61. Chapter one is the introduction, which covers the Fund–s background, its role towards Vision 2030, the rationale for strategic planning, the methodology of developing the Plan and organization of the Plan. Chapter two looks at the conceptual framework, which covers the economic status of women in Kenya, their struggle for economic empowerment and the strategic positioning of WEF. Chapter three
  62. 62. provides the institutional review covering the core-business, clients and services, vision, mission, core values and the current institutional structure. Chapter four presents situational analysis covering evaluation of WEF’s past performance, the internal and external environment and stakeholder analysis. Chapter five looks at the strategic framing, which covers the business model, strategic themes, objectives and strategies. Chapter six presents
  63. 63. the implementation matrix, which covers for each of the strategic objectives, the strategies, impacts, activities, implementing actors, time frame and resource requirements. Chapter seven covers the proposed institutional structure. Chapter eight highlights the mechanisms for monitoring and evaluation of the implementation process. Women Enterprise Fund Strategic Plan 2009 -2012 5
  64. 64. CHAPTER TWO CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK 2.1 ECONOMIC STATUS OF WOMEN IN KENYA For a long time, the contribution of women in economic development was not recognized even though they constitute about 50.5% of the total population. Socio-cultural practices have contributed to the economic isolation of women. These practices deny many women the right to ownership of property and other productive assets. Some of the
  65. 65. laws in Kenya discriminate against women (e.g. the customary law) when it comes to inheritance of property. The female gender largely accesses resources through parentage or marriage but with no ownership, control or decision-making power. Further, many women are left destitute in the society after the death of their husbands or parents exposing them to threats and hostility from their in-laws. Many succumb to the threats and
  66. 66. hostility and move away from their homes to live in abject poverty. This makes them face economic difficulties, especially in accessing financial services from financial intermediaries who require them to provide some form of collateral. Gender disparities in terms of access to education, retention in school, transition from one level of education to the other and academic performance remains one of the challenges facing girl-child
  67. 67. in the country. These disparities may be attributed to various factors, among them, societal beliefs and practices. Many women, especially in rural areas, therefore find themselves disadvantaged in establishing and running successful businesses due to lack of technical qualifications and inadequate market information. According to a survey conducted in 2006 on the well-being in Kenya1, women constitute 29% of formal wage employment. The low formal wage
  68. 68. employment may be attributed to low education attainment and is one of the reasons for disparities in income. The report found out that 50.8% of females are poor with 31.2% of poor households being female headed. 1 Report on well being in Kenya, KIHBS, 2006 Women Enterprise Fund Strategic Plan 2009 -2012 6
  69. 69. 2.2 STRATEGIC POSITIONING OF THE WEF The establishment of Women Enterprise Fund is a positive step towards ensuring resources reach excluded women. It is also a testimony of the Kenya government’s commitment to the realization of the 3rd Millennium Development Goal (MDG) on women empowerment and gender equity. In a bid to achieve its mandate, the Fund started by availing funds to the
  70. 70. target women entrepreneurs. This is being undertaken through two main operational channels, namely the Ministry of Gender, Children and Social Development (the Ministry channel) and the Micro Finance Institutions (MFI) channel. The MFI channel takes the large part of the funds compared to the Ministry channel. The selected MFIs disburse the funds availed to them at 1% p.a. for on’lending to women entrepreneurs at 8% interest
  71. 71. rate per annum on reducing balance. The loans disbursed through the Ministry channel attract a 5% one-off administrative fee. In its endeavour to reduce the challenges facing women, the Fund intends to concentrate on the following areas: · Financial services to target women entrepreneurs; · Capacity building; and · Access to information. Successful execution of the Fund’s mandate is supposed to address the existing hurdles
  72. 72. women face in venturing and growing sustainable enterprises. The Fund is expected to contribute to poverty reduction and employment creation among women. The medium term goal of the Fund is to improve the economic conditions of the excluded women and graduate them to the mainstream financial institutions. The long term goal is to provide a one-stop shop where women can access financial and other business
  73. 73. development support services. It must however be noted that reliance on government funding alone may not enable the Fund achieve these objectives nor have the desired long-term impact. The Fund needs to mobilize funds from other sources so as to carry out its planned activities in a sustainable manner. Women Enterprise Fund Strategic Plan 2009 -2012 7
  74. 74. The Fund, as is currently constituted under the Financial Regulations, faces constraints that may hinder the attainment of its objectives. Its legal capacity to contract with development partners, financiers and other parties is limited thus unable to foster much needed partnerships and fund raising activities among others. The Fund also faces challenge in attracting qualified and experienced officers. It has to depend on the parent
  75. 75. ministry’s field staff who are not directly accountable to the Fund. These officers have their regular core duties while the Fund’s activities are peripheral. This compromises the Fund’s efficiency and effectiveness. It is therefore imperative to give the Fund legal independence through appropriate legislation that is superior to current regulations. It is expected that such legal independence will enable the Fund to effectively engage other
  76. 76. parties and deliver on its mandates. Women Enterprise Fund Strategic Plan 2009 -2012 8
  77. 77. CHAPTER THREE INSTITUTIONAL REVIEW 3.1 CORE BUSINESS The core business of the Fund is derived from its mandate as stipulated in the Legal Notice No. 147: Government Financial Management (Women Enterprise Fund) Regulations, 2007. The role of the Fund can thus, be interpreted to be the provision of support, both technical and financial, to women entrepreneurs that
  78. 78. will enable them contribute to national development. 3.2 CLIENTS AND SERVICES The Fund has categorised Kenyan women entrepreneurs as depicted in the pyramid below: Figure 1: Classification of Kenyan women entrepreneurs A ’ Women entrepreneurs operating medium and large enterprises B ’ Women entrepreneurs operating micro and small enterprises C ’ Potential women
  79. 79. entrepreneurs The Fund targets both women entrepreneurs and potential women entrepreneurs at different levels of the pyramid as described in figure 1 above. The Fund will offer different products and services for each category of women entrepreneurs. 3.2.1 Financial services Women Enterprise Fund Strategic Plan 2009 -2012 9
  80. 80. The clients to be targeted for funds channeled through the constituencies are women entrepreneurs and /or potential women entrepreneurs, be they in the formal or the informal sector (e.g. hawkers2 and Kiosk3 owners), who are unable to access funds through the established financial institutions. They are able to borrow an initial amount up to Kshs. 50,000 as a group. The loans
  81. 81. channelled through the MFIs target women entrepreneurs operating small and medium enterprises who would like to borrow as individuals, a group or companies owned by women, up to Kshs. 500,000, without reference to the Fund Advisory Board. The Advisory Board will review the maximum amount that can be loaned through each channel from time to time. 3.2.2 Investment in micro, small and medium
  82. 82. enterprises oriented infrastructure Facilitation of investment in micro, small and medium enterprises oriented infrastructure such as business markets or business incubators is aimed at creating an all inclusive conducive environment for women in the informal sector to run their businesses efficiently. This service targets women operating micro, small and medium enterprises. 3.2.3 Development of linkages with large enterprises Development of linkages with
  83. 83. large enterprises will be aimed at linking the woman entrepreneur to large enterprises where she can have access to technology, information, business sub’ contracting programmes and quality improvement through benchmarking. It targets women operating micro, small and medium enterprises. 3.2.4 Facilitation of marketing of products and services of women enterprises The Fund plans to facilitate marketing of products and services of women owned
  84. 84. enterprises by way of creating awareness of and promoting the products and services both in the local and international markets. The women targeted with these services are those operating micro, small, medium and large enterprises. 3. 2.5 Capacity building 2 Vendors selling merchandise by moving from place to place asking people to buy them. 3 A small shop where household goods are sold in
  85. 85. small quantities. Women Enterprise Fund Strategic Plan 2009 -2012 10
  86. 86. Capacity building will target both internal and external customers. Internal customers include the Advisory Board, WEF secretariat and the Ministry gender officers. The external customers include women entrepreneurs in micro, small and medium businesses, potential individual women entrepreneurs, constituency committees and partnering MFIs. Carrying out capacity building for both the internal and external customers is expected to result in the target groups acquiring the relevant skills, knowledge and
  87. 87. further create awareness through enhanced networking. 3.3 VISION Our vision is: Tosocial llyandeconomical llyempowerKenyanwomenentrepreneursforeconomic development. 3.4 MISSION Our mission is: Tomobiliseresourcesandofferaccesstoaffordablecreditandbusinesssupportservicesto womenentrepreneurs. 3.5 CORE VALUES In its endeavor to realize its vision and mission, WEF upholds the following core values: 3.5.1 Integrity We undertake to always act morally, ethically and consistently demonstrate a high degree of respect
  88. 88. and probity in dealing with our stakeholders. 3.5.2 Teamwork In the discharge of WEF’s mandate, we will embrace teamwork and be committed to maintaining high standards of service delivery. 3.5.3 Innovation We believe that the way forward in attaining the Fund’s mandate is through generation of creative and innovative ideas. We therefore, welcome and support creativity and innovation. 3.5.4 Courageous
  89. 89. Women Enterprise Fund Strategic Plan 2009 -2012 11
  90. 90. In WEF, we believe it is possible to break the vicious cycle of poverty facing the country through women empowerment and will boldly facilitate undertakings aimed at changing the status quo. 3.5.5 Respect for diversity We appreciate the different backgrounds and beliefs of the people we interact with and will always respect these diversities. 3.6 CURRENT INSTITUTIONAL STRUCTURE The Women Enterprise Fund
  91. 91. is currently managed through the following institutions: 3.6.1 The Advisory Board The Advisory Board is responsible for overseeing the management of the Fund and advising the Ministry generally on the operations of the Fund. It is composed of the following members: ’ A non-executive chairperson; ’ Permanent Secretary, Ministry of Gender, Children and Social Development; ’ Permanent Secretary, Ministry of Finance; ’ Permanent Secretary, Ministry of Trade
  92. 92. and Industry; ’ Permanent Secretary, Ministry of Agriculture; ’ Permanent Secretary, Ministry of Planning, National Development and Vision 2030; and ’ Five persons with expertise and experience in Enterprise Development and Financial Management. 3.6.2 Secretariat The secretariat is responsible for the day to day management of the affairs of the Fund. It is headed by a Chief Executive Officer who, like other staff, is appointed competitively. The Secretariat is
  93. 93. responsible for the following duties: ’ Supervise and control the administration of the Fund; ’ Consult with the Advisory Board on matters relating to the administration of the Fund; ’ Maintain books of accounts and records of all activities relating to the Fund and undertakings financed from the Fund; Women Enterprise Fund Strategic Plan 2009 -2012 12
  94. 94. ’ Prepare a statement of accounts relating to the Fund and showing the expenditure incurred from the Fund in respect of each financial year and transmit to the Controller and Auditor General in accordance with the provisions of the Public Audit Act, 2003; ’ Furnish such additional information as may be deemed proper and sufficient for the purpose of examination and audit by the
  95. 95. Controller and Auditor General in accordance with the provisions of the Public Audit Act, 2003; and ’ Open and operate a bank account at a bank to be approved by the Minister for Finance. 3.6.3 Divisional Women Enterprise Fund Committee (DWEFC) The DWEFC is responsible for undertaking the following roles: ’ Support the capacity building of the beneficiaries of the Fund and their institutions;
  96. 96. ’ Create awareness on the funds disbursement procedures and requirements; and ’ Assist in the mobilization, selection, identification and vetting of the women groups seeking loans. It is composed of the following members: ’ The chairperson who is the Divisional Officer; ’ The secretary who is the District Gender and Social Development Officer; ’ The treasurer who is elected by the Committee; ’ A
  97. 97. representative of the Local Authority in the Division/District; ’ A representative of one active local NGO in the Division/District; ’ A representative of women with disability; ’ A prominent woman entrepreneur; ’ A representative of Faith Based Organization; ’ A representative of the Provincial Administration; and ’ Ex-official sitting member of Parliament. 3.6.4 The District Gender and Social Development Officers Women Enterprise Fund Strategic Plan
  98. 98. 2009 -2012 13
  99. 99. These are ministry officials who reach the various women entrepreneurs at the constituency level on behalf of the Fund. They have the following roles: · Secretary to the Divisional Women Enterprise Fund Committee; · Monitor the disbursement of the funds through the financial intermediaries; · Monitor how the beneficiaries are utilizing the loan; · Facilitate loan recovery; and · Participate in the capacity building of the groups who obtain loans. 3.6.5
  100. 100. Micro Finance Institutions These are WEF business partners who assist in distribution of funds. The funds distributed through the MFIs are open to women entrepreneurs who would like to borrow up to Kshs. 500,000. Amounts above this figure have to be referred to the Advisory Board for approval. Women Enterprise Fund Strategic Plan 2009 -2012 14
  101. 101. CHAPTER FOUR SITUATIONAL ANALYSIS 4.1 EVALUATION OF PAST PERFORMANCE A review of the Fund’s performance was undertaken in order to isolate factors that may have had favourable or unfavourable influence on the results. This was carried out through an analysis of the status of the fund disbursements to date and the effectiveness of the two disbursement channels. The
  102. 102. results are as follows: 4.1.1 Allocation of funds As at 30th June, 2009, the amount of funds received by WEF had been allocated and disbursed as shown in the table below: Amount allocated Amount disbursed Kshs. Kshs. Financial intermediaries 640,000,000 515,000,000 Constituency 210,000,000 167,000,000 Capacity building 30,000,000 6,000,000 WEF Administration 100,000,000 20,000,000 Community mobilization 20,000,000 8,400,000 Total 1,000,000,000 716,400,000 Table
  103. 103. 1: Allocation of funds Some of the amount allocated to the financial intermediaries was not disbursed due to delay in furnishing the Fund with the required securities. The amount allocated to constituencies was not fully disbursed due to the following reasons: Women Enterprise Fund Strategic Plan 2009 -2012 15
  104. 104. ’ Lack of awareness of the Fund. Given that it was the first year of operation, many women were still not aware of the existence of the Fund while others were not familiar with the procedures to be followed for one to obtain a loan. ’ Errors in filling some of the loan forms leading to delays in loan disbursement. ’ Centralised loan approval
  105. 105. system that resulted in much time being taken in communicating between the different levels of the Fund thus causing delays in disbursement of funds. ’ Post election disruptions. Out of the funds allocated for community mobilization and capacity building, the amount disbursed was utilised in activities aimed at publicising the Fund and training of the constituency committees that vet loan applications. The funds allocated
  106. 106. to community mobilization were also applied on the development of the Fund’s logo and the official launch of the Fund. Most of the funds allocated for administration were not spent because initially the Fund did not have its own staff thus relied on the Ministry officials to carry out the administrative duties. The salaries for the officials were paid for by the Ministry. Other operational costs
  107. 107. were met by the Fund. 4.1.2 Beneficiaries of loans disbursed The funds disbursed through the constituencies were lent to women groups within the constituencies. The number of individual women-owned micro, small and medium enterprises that benefitted from the funds disbursed through the constituency channel was 80,000 as at 30th June, 2009. As at the same date, 12,000 women-owned micro, small and medium
  108. 108. enterprises had benefited from the funds loaned through the financial intermediaries’ channel. 4.1.3 Progress made on the other mandates of the Fund Women Enterprise Fund Strategic Plan 2009 -2012 16
  109. 109. There has been insignificant progress made in the attainment of the other four mandates of the Fund as depicted in the table below: No. Mandate Status 1 Capacity building of women entrepreneurs and their institutions. 210 constituency committees trained. 2,000 women trained. 2 Attract and facilitate investment in micro, small and medium enterprises oriented commercial infrastructure such as business markets or
  110. 110. business incubators that will be beneficial to women enterprises. Nil 3 Support women oriented micro, small and medium enterprises to develop linkages with large enterprises. Nil 4 Facilitate marketing of products and services of women enterprises in both domestic and international markets. Participation in Nairobi International Show Table 2: Progress made on the other mandates 4.1.4 The channels of loan
  111. 111. disbursement In reviewing the performance of the two channels, it has been established that the MFI channel may not reach many of the targeted women though it has the requisite technical capacity. Using this channel, WEF is able to reduce its credit risk to almost zero since this is borne by the MFIs. However, no monitoring and evaluation system has been put in place to ensure
  112. 112. that WEF funds are accessed by the targeted women entrepreneurs and at the agreed terms and conditions. The Ministry channel, on the other hand, has the advantage of having greater impact in reaching the targeted women entrepreneurs. Under this channel, the Fund takes the whole risk of default in loan repayment. It is also worth noting that the Ministry channel does not have technically qualified
  113. 113. staff to ov ersee the loaning process. It relies on the Divisional Women Enterprise Fund Committees (DWEFC), who may not have the technical know-how on credit management including appraising of loan applications. The other challenge posed by this channel is lack of control by the Fund over the Ministry staff making it difficult to effectively manage the loan disbursement and recovery processes. Women Enterprise Fund
  114. 114. Strategic Plan 2009 -2012 17
  115. 115. 4.2 INTERNAL ENVIRONMENT Analysis of the internal environment identifies factors within the organization that may influence the Fund positively (strengths) or negatively (weaknesses). 4.2.1 Strengths The main strengths of WEF include: i. Supportive and committed Advisory Board with diverse expertise hence able to offer strategic direction to the Fund. ii. Committed staff. iii. Subsidized interest rate that is able to attract the target
  116. 116. group of women entrepreneurs. iv. Ability of the Fund to recruit and engage financial intermediaries that have technical capacity and established infrastructure. v. The support by the parent ministry, especially at the grassroots, enables the Fund to reach women entrepreneurs all over the country. 4.2.2 Weaknesses The weaknesses of WEF are: i. Limiting legislation. The Fund does not have legal independence and thus relies on
  117. 117. the parent ministry for some of its operations. This also inhibits its ability to contract with third parties. ii. Insufficient staff to manage the process of loan disbursement and recovery, both at the head office and grassroots. iii. Staff have inadequate technical skills and experience in credit management and execution of other Fund mandates. iv. Manual processes and operations which are inefficient and inherently risky. v. Lack
  118. 118. of a fully operationalised risk management framework. vi. Insufficient funds to have significant impact even after full operationalization of the Fund. vii. Existence of a bureaucratic loan management process, e.g. difficulties in accessing the loan application forms and long period of waiting for the loans to be approved. viii.Inadequate monitoring and evaluation processes and systems. Women Enterprise Fund Strategic Plan 2009 -2012
  119. 119. 18
  120. 120. 4.3 EXTERNAL ENVIRONMENT Analysis of the external environment identifies factors outside the control of the organization that impact on the organization positively (opportunities) or negatively (threats). 4.3.1 Opportunities The opportunities available to the Fund are: i. High demand for products and services of the Fund. ii. Existence of supporting frameworks such as the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) framework, Vision 2030 and
  121. 121. gender policy in place. iii. Existing organized and registered self help groups. iv. Existence of institutions offering technological support and training for women entrepreneurs e.g. Kenya Institute of Business Training (KIBT), Kenya Industrial Estate (KIE), Kenya Industrial Research and Development Institute (KIRDI) and Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology (JKUAT), etc. v. Existence of several government initiatives targeting Micro and Small Enterprises (MSE), e.g. construction of
  122. 122. markets, decent work sheds and business solution centres. vi. Existence of trading blocks and treaties like the East Africa Community, Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa (COMESA), African Growth Opportunity Act (AGOA), which may provide a market for the products of women entrepreneurs. 4.3.2 Threats Threats to WEF are: i. Global financial meltdown and poor performance of the economy which could lead
  123. 123. to poor loan repayment. ii. Impact of HIV/AIDS and other pandemics leading to frequent collapse of enterprises and diversion of funds which may lead to high rates of loan default. iii. Political interference and social unrests that may hinder the operations of the Fund. iv. Insecurity in the country that may affect the funded women entrepreneurs resulting into loss of loaned funds. v. Low levels of financial literacy among women,
  124. 124. especially in the rural and semi urban areas. vi. Women enterprises engaging in activities that are detrimental to the environment e.g. charcoal trade and sand harvesting etc., which could lead to loan default if such funded enterprises are Women Enterprise Fund Strategic Plan 2009 -2012 19
  125. 125. closed down by National Environment Management Authority (NEMA) or other government agencies. vii. Climatic changes and natural calamities that may affect the funded enterprises resulting into loss of loaned funds. Current drought and famine has had negative impact on borrowers. viii.Low level of women representation in key decision making organs in the country. ix. Cultural barriers, e.g. the fear among men
  126. 126. that when women are empowered gender based violence may increase and destabilise families. x. Competition from other organisations targeting women, especially those giving grants. xi. Widespread culture of free things, e.g. free training, past failures of similar government initiatives where beneficiaries were not paying interest, etc. 4.4 STAKEHOLDER ANALYSIS A stakeholder is any person, group or institution that has an interest in the activities of an
  127. 127. organization. WEF has many stakeholders in its core functions. Some of the key stakeholders include: 4.4.1 Women entrepreneurs These form the key stakeholder of the Fund. The Fund will continue to liaise with women entrepreneurs to ensure adequate facilitation and support of their businesses. This will be achieved by providing them with the necessary information regarding eligibility requirements, loans application process and repayment terms. The women entrepreneurs have
  128. 128. an obligation to repay their loans according to the agreement with the Fund. 4.4.2 The government The government is the main financier of the WEF and expects the Fund to carry out its functions within the stipulated mandate thus assisting in the attainment of the government goals and objectives. As a government institution, the Fund collaborates with other government institutions especially the Ministry of
  129. 129. Gender, Children and Social Development, provincial administration and Ministry of Finance in the discharge of its mandate. Apart from financial support to the Fund, the government is also expected to create a conducive environment for the Fund’s operations. The Fund should therefore develop and promote strong linkages with the parent Ministry and other government institutions. Women Enterprise Fund Strategic Plan 2009 -2012
  130. 130. 20
  131. 131. 4.4.3 Financial intermediaries MFIs play a major role in the disbursement of loans to the Fund’s target group. A portion of the fund is loaned to women entrepreneurs through selected MFIs. The Fund should therefore ensure the selected MFIs meet the pre-set conditions for partnering to enable effective and efficient coverage of the targeted women entrepreneurs. 4.4.4 Development partners In carrying out
  132. 132. its mandate, the Fund recognizes the role played by the development partners. Most of its operations require collaboration with partners, who are expected to provide both financial and technical support to the Fund. The Fund will therefore foster a good working relationship with the identified development partners. 4.4.5 Private sector Activities of the private sector play a significant role in promoting Kenya’s economy. The
  133. 133. Fund should partner with the private sector in spearheading women enterprise development. In particular, there is need to partner with the private sector in provision of business development services to the beneficiaries. 4.4.6 Employees Human resource is a critical determinant of an organization’s performance and largely determines the success or failure of the organization. The employees of WEF constitute a critical asset and
  134. 134. hence their welfare is of utmost importance. WEF is committed to adopting best practices in management of its staff to ensure high productivity and motivation. 4.4.7 The media Media is an important channel of information to the public. The Fund should partner with the media to enhance public awareness of its operations and as a channel of communication with its customers from time
  135. 135. to time. 4.4.8 Research and academic institutions The Fund is key in facilitating information dissemination on matters affecting women entrepreneurs. Linkages and collaborations with research and academic institutions will enhance Women Enterprise Fund Strategic Plan 2009 -2012 21
  136. 136. access to relevant information and emerging issues affecting the operations of women enterprises. Research and academic institutions will also offer an opportunity for learning the ’best practices’ and benchmarking. 4.4.9 Membership associations The Fund recognizes the importance of working in consultation with the existing women associations in pursuing its mandate. The associations provide the Fund with an opportunity to reach many of the targeted
  137. 137. women. They also offer a platform to lobby for favourable policies and regulations. 4.4.10 Community leadership The structure of the Fund provides for divisional committees whose membership is drawn from a cross section of organisations including the local authorities and sitting members of parliament as ex-officials. The support of the grass root leaders is critical for the success of the Fund.
  138. 138. Women Enterprise Fund Strategic Plan 2009 -2012 22
  139. 139. CHAPTER FIVE STRATEGIC FRAMING 5.1 BUSINESS MODEL The business model to be used to reach the targeted women with different services is as follows: 5.1.1 Channels of loan disbursement In disbursing credit to the target women, the Fund intends to make use of the Ministry channel and MFIs with grassroot networks. An appropriate ratio will be determined from
  140. 140. time to time bearing in mind the risks, capacity, efficiency and desirable impact. WEF intends to recruit volunteers at constituency level under a volunteership programme. The interns will be trained on credit management and business development services. They are to work closely with the DWEFC and the Gender and Social Development Officers. However, the ultimate goal of the Fund is to disburse the funds
  141. 141. directly through grassroot based organisations. In this regard, the Fund will explore the possibilities of mobilizing and facilitating the formation of associations of women self-help groups, which would be loaned money for on- lending to individual groups or women. The associations could buy shares of the Fund and be the owners once the Fund is privatised in the future. 5.1.2 Sources of funds In financing
  142. 142. its operations, WEF’s funding will initially come from government and development partners. However, in the long run its funding will mainly be from internally generated resources and commercial funds. Caution will be exercised to make sure that the Fund does not lose its clients targeting and its founding rationale as it raises funds. 5.1.3 Delivery on the other mandates In delivering the other mandates, the
  143. 143. Fund intends to collaborate with development partners, private sector and training institutions, and work together with other government ministries, departments and parastatals. Women Enterprise Fund Strategic Plan 2009 -2012 23
  144. 144. 5.2 STRATEGIC THEMES Strategic themes are the key areas of performance for an organization in a given time period. The following are the strategic themes of WEF for the planning period. 5.2.1 Financial services The primary function of WEF is to provide access to financial services to Kenyan women entrepreneurs who are unable to access finance under the terms and conditions applied
  145. 145. by commercial banks and MFIs. Approximately 40% of all Kenyan women have no access to finance at all; another 40% have access to only informal financial systems4. The demand for loans is thus high. However, the current size of the Fund is limiting in terms of the number of entrepreneurs who can benefit. For the Fund to deliver on its mandate and remain
  146. 146. sustainable, it has to mobilize enough funds for continuous lending. It is therefore vital to scale up the size of the Fund. 5.2.2 Full operationalization of the other mandates of the Fund The Fund has five functions as per its mandate, however only one of these mandates (provision of loans to women entrepreneurs) has been substantially operationalised to date. The other functions (capacity building, infrastructure
  147. 147. development, facilitation of marketing and linkages with large organisations) need to be fully operationalised in order for the Fund to realize its vision. A coordinated process of deliberate interventions to upgrade entrepreneurial skills among women and improving business processes need to be put in place to enable women entrepreneurs achieve economic empowerment. There is need to improve women’s business skills, especially in information technology,
  148. 148. financial management and business management to enhance business sustainability and growth. Women’s access to markets for their products and services is a major challenge, thus development of a marketing strategy that will improve women’s access to new markets including corporate and public sectors procurement opportunities and international markets is important. 4 Women Enterprise Fund Rapid assessment report, 2009 Women Enterprise
  149. 149. Fund Strategic Plan 2009 -2012 24
  150. 150. In addition, women need to be assisted in forming business associations and networks to exchange ideas, gain access to business support and information as well as create a ’voice’ that represents their specific concerns and needs. To encourage start-up women entrepreneurs to venture into production and value addition for their primary products, they need to be supported with the necessary infrastructure by way of business incubation
  151. 151. initiatives and provision of decent, secure and safe market sheds or work spaces. 5.2.3 Strengthening the institutional capacity The way WEF is currently constituted as a semi-autonomous government agency ( SAGA) without independent legal capacity hinders the attainment of its mandate. To discharge its mandate, WEF will require partnering with other organizations for technical support and to help raise funds for its operations. Such partners
  152. 152. are reluctant to engage with the Fund since its legal status is not permanent nor certain. There is therefore need to strengthen its legal capacity by anchoring it in an Act of Parliament or through a Presidential Decree. The Fund also needs to strengthen its human resource capacity. An appropriate organisation structure should be put in place to enhance the management of the
  153. 153. Fund. In addition, employees should be equipped with the necessary skills as a way of enhancing productivity and motivation. Further, there is need to undertake advocacy and publicity of the Fund. The Fund should profile itself strategically in the eyes of the public and lay a claim as a key player in the field of microfinance. 5.2.4 Operational processes and systems The Fund assumes the role of a
  154. 154. financial institution and thus adequate processes and ICT systems are necessary to enhance effective and efficient operations. Further, the Fund operates in all parts of the country, which necessitates systems that will effectively link the operations at the headquarters and the constituencies. To reduce operational risks, it is important that the Fund develops appropriate policies and procedures that will guide the day-to-day business. Women Enterprise
  155. 155. Fund Strategic Plan 2009 -2012 25
  156. 156. 5.3 STRATEGIC OBJECTIVES AND STRATEGIES The following are the strategic objectives and respective strategies under each of the strategic themes: Objective Strategy Theme 1: Financial services 1. To increase the loan portfolio from the current Kshs. 682 million to Kshs. 4 billion by the year 2012 i. Negotiate with participating financial partners to leverage the Fund ii. Develop new market led
  157. 157. loan products and other products 2. To grow the Fund from Kshs. 1.215 billion to Kshs. 3 billion by the year 2012 i. Advocate for enhanced budgetary allocation from the government ii. Collaboration with other partners iii. Enhance risk management of the Fund 3. To increase the number of target women entrepreneur borrowers from 92,000 to over 600,000 by 2012 i. Review partnership agreement
  158. 158. with the MFIs to ensure funds channelled through them reach targeted women ii. Use financial institutions and organizations with grassroot networks Theme 2: Full operationalization of the other mandates of the Fund 1. To link at least 60 women micro, small and medium enterprises in each province with large enterprises by 2012 i. Facilitation of exchange programmes with large enterprises ii. Provide information to
  159. 159. large enterprises on the products and services by women entrepreneurs iii. Facilitate subcontracting programme between women enterprises and large enterprises iv. Facilitate production of quality goods and services by women entrepreneurs 2. To enhance and strengthen the knowledge, skills and capacity of women entrepreneurs i. Facilitate mentorship programmes ii. Facilitate and support training of the Fund beneficiaries iii. Involvement of financial institutions and other
  160. 160. partners in training 3. To facilitate marketing of products and services of women owned enterprises in local and international markets i. Facilitate the participation of women entrepreneurs in local and international trade fairs and exhibitions ii. Encourage women entrepreneurs to organize themselves into marketing groups or companies iii. Facilitate provision of market information to women entrepreneurs iv. Advocate for women entrepreneurs to be allocated
  161. 161. space in the constituency markets v. Advocate for allocation of at least 30% of government’s procurements to women entrepreneurs Women Enterprise Fund Strategic Plan 2009 -2012 26
  162. 162. 4. To facilitate development of supportive infrastructure for women enterprises i. Seek development partners to incubate funded women enterprises e.g. KIRDI, Constituency Development Centres, MSED, EPZA, KGT, etc. ii. Facilitate and support development of decent market space for women entrepreneurs Theme 3: Strengthening the institutional capacity 1. To strengthen institutional capacity of the Fund i. Establishment of an autonomous WEF ii. Build the
  163. 163. HR capacity, organization structure and governance structure of the Fund iii. Build necessary infrastructure to support the operations of the Fund iv. Establish an institutional framework for partnerships 2. To enhance advocacy and publicity of the Fund Develop and implement a communication and marketing strategy Theme 4: Operational processes and systems To enhance efficiency in the operations and processes of the Fund i. Develop
  164. 164. operational processes, policies & procedures ii. Enhance information management system iii. Put in place a functional monitoring and evaluation framework Women Enterprise Fund Strategic Plan 2009 -2012 27
  165. 165. CHAPTER SIX IMPLEMENTATION PLAN Theme 1: Financial Services Objective 1: To increase the loan portfolio from the current Kshs. 682 million to Kshs. 4 billion by the year 2012 Strategy Impact ( s) Activity Time Frame Implementing Actors Resources ( Shs) Negotiate with participating financial partners to leverage the Fund More funds availed to women entrepreneurs by
  166. 166. the financial partners ( i) Hold discussions with the financial partners aimed at leveraging the fund ( ii) Enter into MOUs with financial partners June 2010 June 2010 and continuous Advisory Board/CEO ’ Operational budget Develop new market-led loan products and other products Products tailored to customer needs ( i) Carry out market analysis on the loan products and other products ( ii) Develop
  167. 167. products that meet the needs of the target women entrepreneurs April 2010 August 2010 and continuous CEO/ Operations Manager / Credit Officer million Women Enterprise Fund Strategic Plan 2009 - 2012 28
  168. 168. Objective 2: To grow the Fund from Kshs. 1.215 billion to Kshs. 3 billion by the year 2012 Strategy Impact (s) Activity Time Frame Implementing Actors Resources ( Shs) Advocate for Additional ( i) Prepare and present budget November 2009 and CEO / Finance Operational enhanced allocations from the estimates of the Fund for the continuous Administration Manager budget budgetary government
  169. 169. next three years to the relevant allocation from ministries the government ( ii) Hold discussions with the January 2010 & Advisory Board/CEO parent ministry and Treasury continuous Collaboration with other partners Funding and other support by development ( i) Identify potential development partners December 2009 and continuous CEO/Operations Manager Operational budget partners ( ii) Prepare and submit proposals ’ for funding & other support
  170. 170. to ’ the identified partners Enhance risk Minimal resources ( i) Develop & implement risk June 2010 CEO/Operations Operational management of leakage/losses management policy Manager/Credit Officer budget the Fund Optimal returns to the Fund ( ii) Establish & implement adequate internal controls ’ CEO/ Audit Manager/Operations Manager/ICT Officer ( iii) Review the screening criteria of projects to be funded Immediate CEO/Operations Manager/Credit Officer (
  171. 171. iv) Prepare quarterly reports on the performance of revolving fund Quarterly Credit Officer /Finance & Administration Manager Women Enterprise Fund Strategic Plan 2009 - 2012 29
  172. 172. Objective3: To increase the number of women entrepreneur borrowers from 92,000 to over 600,000 by 2012 Strategy Impact ( s) Activity Time Frame Implementing Actors Resources ( Shs) Review partnership agreement with the MFIs to ensure funds channeled through them reach targeted women Funds channeled through MFIs reaching the target women ( i) Hold meetings with the participating MFIs aimed at
  173. 173. agreeing on policies that ensure the loans reach the target women ( ii) Implement the policies agreed on with the MFIs ( iii) Facilitate joint training for all participating MFIs November 2009 November 2009 and continuous January 2010 and continuous Advisory Board/CEO ’ CEO/ Operations Manager 2 million Use financial Accessibility of loans ( i) Identify financial intermediaries February/ March 2010 Advisory Board/CEO/ Operational
  174. 174. institutions and to women with branches at grassroot level Operations Manager budget organizations with entrepreneurs in all grassroot parts of the country ( ii) Hold discussions & enter into networks agreement with the identified intermediaries aimed at involving them in loan distribution to women entrepreneurs August 2010 and continuous ( iii) Pilot formation of umbrella associations of self help groups at the constituencies through
  175. 175. which funds could be disbursed to the women ( iv) Advocate for privatization of the Fund with the formed women associations as the shareholders March 2010 and continuous September 2012 CEO/ Operations Manager/ Credit Officer Advisory Board/CEO Women Enterprise Fund Strategic Plan 2009 - 2012 30
  176. 176. Theme 2: Full Operationalization of the Other Mandates of the Fund Objective 1: To link at least 60 women micro, small and medium enterprises in each province with large enterprises by 2012 Strategy Impact (s) Activity Time Frame Implementing Actors Resources (Shs) Facilitation of exchange programmes with large enterprises Improved quality of the products by women entrepreneurs ( i) Organize product
  177. 177. & service demonstrations/ shows by large enterprises to women entrepreneurs July 2010 and continuous CEO/ Marketing & Research Manager/ Business Development Officer million Expanded market opportunities through large orders/ subcontracting ( ii) Organize 2 local exchange programmes with large enterprises per province ( iii) Facilitate certification of products June 2010 and continuous Continuous Provide Increased number ( i) Carry out a survey and profile
  178. 178. June 2010 CEO/ Marketing & 13 million information to of women selling the women enterprises in the Research Manager large enterprises their product to provinces and categorize their on the products large enterprises goods and services and services by women ( ii) Identify large enterprises and December 2010 and CEO/ Marketing & entrepreneurs their requirements continuous Research Manager ( iii) Disseminate information to women
  179. 179. entrepreneurs using internet, TV and Radio programmes and WEF website December 2010 and continuous CEO/ Marketing & Research Manager/ ICT Officer Women Enterprise Fund Strategic Plan 2009 - 2012 31
  180. 180. Strategy Impact (s) Activity Time Frame Implementing Actors Resources (Shs) Facilitate subcontracting programme between women enterprises and large enterprises Increased sales volumes by women entrepreneurs ( i) Identify and develop a database of products and services of women entrepreneurs ( ii) Develop a women enterprise directory ( iii) Disseminate the information to women entrepreneurs using internet, TV and Radio programmes December 2010 and
  181. 181. quarterly December 2010 December 2010 and continuous CEO/ Marketing & Research Manager/ ICT Officer 10 million Facilitate production of quality goods & services by women entrepreneurs Competitive quality products and services by women entrepreneurs ( i) Facilitate demonstrations by experts in production ( ii) Sensitize women entrepreneurs about quality standards ( iii) Liaise & link women entrepreneurs with KEBS and KIRDI for certification of
  182. 182. their products and services December 2010 and continuous Continuous ’ CEO/ Marketing & Research Manager million Women Enterprise Fund Strategic Plan 2009 - 2012 32
  183. 183. Objective 2: To enhance and strengthen the knowledge, skills and capacity of women entrepreneurs Strategy Impact ( s) Activity Time Frame Implementing Actors Resources (Kshs) Facilitate mentorship programmes Improved ability to manage enterprises Higher survival rates of women owned enterprises ( i) Develop WEF specific mentorship programmes ( ii) With partner support identify, train & certify at least 5 mentors per
  184. 184. province June 2010 July 2010 and continuous CEO/ Marketing & Research Manager/ Training Officer ’ 5 million ( iii) Implement the mentorship programme ’ Facilitate and support training of the Fund beneficiaries Better management of women enterprises ( i) Carry out a training needs assessment for women entrepreneurs February 2010 CEO/ Marketing & Research Manager/ Training Officer 14.8 million ( ii) Develop standard training
  185. 185. modules/curriculum in partnership with development partners April 2010 ’ ( iii) Identify development partners to sponsor the trainings April 2010 ( iv) Undertake training of at least 2000 women per province per year on the identified areas April 2010 & continuous Women Enterprise Fund Strategic Plan 2009 - 2012 33
  186. 186. Strategy Impact ( s) Activity Time Frame Implementing Actors Resources (Kshs) Involvement of financial institutions and other partners in training More women entrepreneurs trained ( i) Undertake training of trainers programme for participating MFIs in partnership with development partners e. g. JICA, ILO, etc. ( ii) Identify and involve government ministries, departments and parastatals that undertake entrepreneurial training to train women ( iii)
  187. 187. Monitor the training of women entrepreneurs undertaken by the trainers November 2009 and continuous ” ” CEO/ training Officer CEO/Training Officer/ M & E Officer Operational budget Women Enterprise Fund Strategic Plan 2009 - 2012 34
  188. 188. Objective 3: To facilitate marketing of products and services of women owned enterprises in local and international markets Strategy Impact (s) Activity Time Frame Implementing Actors Resources (Kshs) Facilitate the participation of women entrepreneurs in local and international trade fairs and exhibitions Increased sales of women enterprise products and services ( i) Assist women produce market led products by availing market
  189. 189. information to them ( ii) Link women beneficiaries to marketing organizations e. g. EPC, FEWA Immediate and continuous ” CEO/ Marketing & Research Manager Business Development Officer 3.5 million ( iii) Liaise with organizers of local and international trade fairs and exhibitions for affordable charges to beneficiaries of the Fund February 2010 and continuous ( iv) Sensitize women on ”improving your exhibition skills” March
  190. 190. 2010 and continuous Encourage women entrepreneurs to organize themselves into marketing groups or companies Better prices/Increased sales turnover by women enterprises ( i) Educate women on benefits of marketing their products through marketing groups ( ii) Liaise with the Ministry of Co- operative Development and Marketing, UNDP and other partners to assist women form marketing groups April 2010 and continuous January 2010 and continuous
  191. 191. CEO/ Marketing & Research Manager CEO/ Marketing & Research Manager/Training Officer million Women Enterprise Fund Strategic Plan 2009 - 2012 35
  192. 192. Facilitate provision of market information to women entrepreneurs Informed women entrepreneurs ( i) Gather & compile market information ( ii) Provide market information on the Fund website ( iii) Organize interactive radio programmes aimed at disseminating market information and other relevant information to women entrepreneurs April 2010 and continuous May 2010 and continuous January 2010 and continuous ICT/ Marketing Research Manager million Advocate
  193. 193. for women entrepreneurs to be allocated space Increased involvement of women entrepreneurs in ( i) Investigate women entrepreneurs” space requirements December 2011 CEO/ Marketing & Research Manager Operational budget in the constituency markets business activities ( ii) Hold discussions with the relevant local authorities January 2012 ” Advocate for allocation of at least 30% of government procurements to women entrepreneurs Increased business avenues for
  194. 194. women entrepreneurs Hold discussions with PPOA and other relevant bodies aimed at revising the procurement regulations to provide for at least 30% of procurement contracts to women entrepreneurs May 2010 Advisory Board/CEO Operational budget Women Enterprise Fund Strategic Plan 2009 - 2012 36
  195. 195. Objective 4: To facilitate development of supportive infrastructure of women enterprises Strategy Impact (s) Activity Time Frame Implementing Actors Resources ( Kshs) Seek development partners to incubate funded women enterprises e. g. KIRDI, Constituency Development Centres, MSED, EPZA, KGT, etc. Sustainable women enterprises ( i) Identify the enterprises that qualify for incubation with the respective partners ( ii) Enter into agreement
  196. 196. with the identified institutions to incubate the enterprises February 2010 & continuous March 2010 and continuous CEO/ Marketing & Research Manager Operational budget Facilitate and support development of decent market space for women entrepreneurs Conducive work environment for women entrepreneurs ( i) Enter into partnerships with organizations e. g. local authorities, Kenya Gatsby Trust, etc. for development of markets for women entrepreneurs ( ii)
  197. 197. Venture into public-private partnerships aimed at developing markets for women entrepreneurs December 2009 and continuous ” CEO/ Business Development Officer Operational budget Women Enterprise Fund Strategic Plan 2009 - 2012 37
  198. 198. Theme 3: Strengthening the Institutional Capacity Objective1: To strengthen institutional capacity of the Fund Strategy Impact (s) Activity Time Frame Implementing Actors Resources (Kshs) Establishment of an Prompt decision Organize discussions with the relevant Immediate Advisory Board/CEO Operational autonomous WEF making in the Fund authorities e. g. the Kenya Law Reform Commission, aimed at making the Fund autonomous budget Build the
  199. 199. HR capacity, organization structure and governance structure of the Fund Adequate human resources and structures for effective and efficient service delivery ( i) Review the organization and governance structures ( ii) Develop job descriptions and specifications for the Advisory Board committees and the secretariat staff ( iii) Recruit appropriate staff at the head office and in the field ( iv) Formulate policy on volunteership
  200. 200. ( v) Engage and train volunteers in every constituency through an internship programme ( vi) Develop HR policies and scheme of service ( vii) Develop and roll out policy on volunteership ( viii) Conduct staff training needs analysis ( ix) Train staff November 2009 January 2010 June 2010 ” ” ” ” August 2010 September 2010 and continuous Advisory Board/ CEO/ HR Officer ”
  201. 201. ” ” ” ” ” HR Officer/Training Officer million Women Enterprise Fund Strategic Plan 2009 - 2012 38
  202. 202. Strategy Impact (s) Activity Time Frame Implementing Actors Resources (Kshs) Build the necessary infrastructure to support operations of the Fund Efficiency and effectiveness in operations of the Fund ( i) Review the infrastructure in place and identify the gaps that need filling ( ii) Acquire the necessary facilities including additional office space to fill the identified gaps ( iii) Automate processes of the
  203. 203. Fund Immediate Immediate April 2010 CEO/Operations Manager/ Finance Administration Manager CEO/Operations Manager/ICT officer ” 8 million ( iv) Establish constituency offices February 2011 ” Establish an Improved ( i) Develop guidelines for partnerships Immediate CEO/Operations Operational institutional relationship with Manager budget framework to the partners ( ii) Implement the guidelines and review engage partners them regularly Immediate and continuous Women Enterprise Fund
  204. 204. Strategic Plan 2009 - 2012 39
  205. 205. Objective 2: To enhance advocacy and publicity of the Fund targeting all stakeholders Strategy Impact (s) Activity Time Frame Implementing Actors Resources (Kshs) Develop and implement a communication and marketing strategy Increased awareness and more women accessing the services of the fund More development partners involved in the Fund activities Depoliticization of the Fund Public goodwill in Fund and support (
  206. 206. i) Place advertisements in daily newspapers, radios and TVs ( ii) Develop and distribute fliers on the products of the Fund ( iii) Organize visits to various constituencies in liaison with the community leaders to market the products ( iv) Popularize the WEF brand name by ensuring the participating MFIs use the WEF”s brand name and all WEF documents contain the brand name (
  207. 207. v) Develop WEF website ( vi) WEF to participate in local and international forums related to its mandate, e. g. international women”s day, etc. ( vii) Participate in ASK shows/ trade fairs/ regional and international exhibitions January 2010 and continuous ” ” November 2009 March 2010 Continuous ” Marketing &Research Manager/ Business Development Officer CEO/ Marketing & Research Manager/ Business Development Officer CEO/ Operations
  208. 208. Manager/ ICT officer CEO/ Marketing & Research Manager 22 million Women Enterprise Fund Strategic Plan 2009 - 2012 40
  209. 209. Theme 4: Operational Processes and Systems Objective: To enhance efficiency in the operations and processes of the Fund Strategy Impact ( s) Activity Time Frame Implementing Actors Resources ( Kshs) Develop operational processes, policies & procedures Increased efficiency and effectiveness in service delivery ( i) Identify the gaps in the current operational processes, policies & procedures ( ii) Document the operational
  210. 210. processes, policies & procedures ( iii) Develop a service charter of the Fund ( iv) Decentralize verification of loan application forms under C-WES ( v) Use current technology in disbursement of funds to successful applicants and in loan recovery e.g. EFT, M-Pesa, ZAP Immediate December 2009 Immediate December 2009 ” CEO/Operations Manager Advisory Board/CEO ” CEO/ Operations Manager / Credit Officer CEO/ Operations Manager
  211. 211. /ICT Officer/ Credit Officer 5.5 million Enhance information management system Efficient and effective flow of information in the Fund ( i) Identify and procure relevant software and hardware for the Fund ( ii) Train personnel at all levels on IT Immediate April 2010 Operations Manager / ICT officer ICT Officer /Training Officer 20.1 million ( iii) Develop a standardized reporting format to be used
  212. 212. by financial partners to report on the status of loans disbursement December 2009 Operations Manager/Credit Officer Women Enterprise Fund Strategic Plan 2009 - 2012 41
  213. 213. StrategyImpact( s) ActivityTimeFrameImplementingActorsResources( Kshs) PutinplaceafunctionalmonitoringandevaluationframeworkIncreasedeffectivenessofthe Fund( i) Conductabaselinesurveyonthestatusofwomenenterprises( ii) Developamonitoringandevaluationtool( iii) CarryoutM&EofwomenenterprisesMarch2010March2010June2010& annuallyAdvisoryBoard/ CEO/ ExpertsCEO/ AuditManager/ M& EOfficer” 9millionStrategyImpact( s) ActivityTimeFrameImplementingActorsResources( Kshs) PutinplaceafunctionalmonitoringandevaluationframeworkIncreasedeffectivenessofthe Fund( i) Conductabaselinesurveyonthestatusofwomenenterprises( ii) Developamonitoringandevaluationtool( iii) CarryoutM&EofwomenenterprisesMarch2010March2010June2010& annuallyAdvisoryBoard/ CEO/ ExpertsCEO/ AuditManager/ M& EOfficer” 9million Women Enterprise Fund Strategic Plan 2009 - 2012 42
  214. 214. CHAPTER SEVEN INSTITUTIONAL STRUCTURE 7.1 ADVISORY BOARD The Advisory Board is responsible for overseeing the management of the Fund and advising the Ministry on the operations of the Fund. The board has the power to establish appropriate committees (standing and ad hoc) to enable it fulfil its role efficiently. During the planning period, the following committees will assist the Board in
  215. 215. discharging its role: 7.1.1 Audit and risk committee The audit and risk committee”s role is to assist the Board in the effective discharge of its responsibilities for the financial reporting, internal control structures, internal and external audit functions and risk management and compliance systems of the Fund. The committee will review, oversee and report to the Board on the following:
  216. 216. i. The annual financial reporting process and accounting policies for the Fund; ii. The scope of the Fund”s internal audit and external audit programs and any material issues arising from these audits; iii. The performance of the internal and external auditors; iv. The effectiveness of the systems of accounting and internal controls for the Fund; v. The quality of reporting by the Fund; vi.
  217. 217. The effectiveness of the processes used by management to monitor and ensure compliance with laws, regulations, ethical guidelines and obligations for external reporting of financial information; vii. Identification and management of material risk exposures (actual or potential) to the Fund; viii.The effectiveness of the Fund”s risk management systems and strategies; and ix. Other duties as assigned by the Board. Women Enterprise Fund Strategic Plan 2009
  218. 218. -2012 43
  219. 219. 7.1.2 Loans approval committee The loans approval committee is charged with the responsibility of overseeing the allocation and disbursement of the Fund”s loans. In particular, the functions of the loan approval committee are as follows: i. Review periodically the rules, regulations, procedures and standards for the granting of loans to the women entrepreneurs and partnering MFIs; ii. Recommend changes to the loan policy to
  220. 220. the Advisory Board when desirable; iii. Review and approve or disapprove loan applications for amounts determined by the Board; iv. Establish WEF”s administrative loan policies; and v. Other duties as assigned by the Board. 7.1.3 Staff and remuneration committee The staff and remuneration committee assists the WEF Board in the effective discharge of its responsibilities for the appointment and review of performance of the Fund”s secretariat and
  221. 221. the system of remuneration and benefits for the staff. The Committee shall review and provide recommendations to the Advisory Board on: i. The appointment and termination of the CEO and his/her direct reports; ii. The performance measures for the CEO and his/her direct reports; iii. Annual performance payments to the CEO and his/her direct reports; iv. Succession planning for the CEO and his/her
  222. 222. direct reports; v. Remuneration policies; vi. The professional development of Directors, the Chief Executive Officer and Direct reports to CEO; and vii. Other duties as assigned by the Board. Women Enterprise Fund Strategic Plan 2009 -2012 44
  223. 223. 7.2 CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER The Chief Executive Officer shall ensure proper and efficient management of the Fund under the policy guidance of the Board. The CEO will be responsible for overall leadership and management of the Fund operations including: i. Formulation and implementation of appropriate policies and procedures within the Fund; ii. Financial management and reporting; iii. Human resources management; iv. Spearheading
  224. 224. the Fund”s initiatives in sourcing of finances for various programmes and overseeing their application; v. Promoting positive image of the Fund; and vi. Performing any other lawful duties as approved by the Advisory Board. 7.3 DEPARTMENTS To discharge its mandate effectively, Women Enterprise Fund should establish the following departments: 1. Operations Department; 2. Marketing and Research Department; 3. Finance and Administration Department; and 4. Audit
  225. 225. Department; 5. Legal Department. The functions of these departments are explained below: 7.3.1 Operations Department The Operations Department shall be responsible for the following duties: i. Formulation and implementation of the lending policies, procedures and practices; ii. Process, appraise and recommend loan applications; iii. Coordinate all activities in relation to lending; iv. Evaluation of partnering MFIs; v. Handle loan enquiries;
  226. 226. Women Enterprise Fund Strategic Plan 2009 -2012 45
  227. 227. vi. Offer financial advisory services to beneficiaries; vii. Take necessary action to recover overdue loans; and viii.Perform any other lawful duties incidental to the functions of the Operations Department as approved by the Advisory Board. 7.3.2 Marketing, Research and Communication Department The Marketing, Research and Communication Department is responsible for the following duties: i. Formulation, interpretation and application of marketing, research and communication policies,
  228. 228. procedures, rules and regulations; ii. Undertaking promotions and publicity campaigns and establishment of market networks and linkages for beneficiaries” product /services; iii. Organizing for market linkages and business incubations; iv. Ensuring effective market research and development; v. Ensuring provision of quality training, research assistance and analysis services to the Fund and the beneficiaries of the Fund; vi. Continuous assessment and prioritization of needs, opportunities and demands
  229. 229. for training and research interventions in the Fund; vii. Ensuring production of quality research reports; viii. Facilitation of business development services; ix. Designing new competitive and customer driven products for the Fund; x. Ensuring good public relations between the Fund and its partners and the world at large; xi. Production and dissemination of the Fund”s information; xii. Ensuring timely and effective communication with the media and
  230. 230. other external parties; xiii. Overseeing preparation of the Fund publications such as newsletters, calendars and articles in journals; and xiv. Performing any other lawful duties incidental to the functions of the Market, Research and Communication Department as approved by the Advisory Board. Women Enterprise Fund Strategic Plan 2009 -2012 46
  231. 231. 7.3.3 Finance and Administration Department The Finance and Administration Department will be responsible for the following functions: i. Formulation and implementation of financial and accounting policies and procedures; ii. Formulation and implementation of administration and human resource policies and procedures; iii. Formulation and implementation of procurement policies and procedures; iv. Formulation and implementation of ICT policies and procedures; v. Advising on
  232. 232. Fund”s commitments and contractual obligations; vi. Preparation of all financial reports in accordance with the relevant regulations; vii. Preparation, implementation, control and coordination of all the Fund”s budgets; viii. Expenditure monitoring and reporting; ix. Overall management of the procurement, storage and dispatch of office supplies; x. Management of WEF”s facilities in terms of cleanliness, security and provision of utilities; xi. Planning, procuring and supply of goods
  233. 233. and services for WEF in accordance with the applicable laws; xii. Ensuring proper custody of records, resources and maintenance of sound flow of information with the Fund; xiii. Maintenance of the Fund”s asset registers; xiv. Development, implementation and management of computerised information system; xv. Ensuring timely provision of ICT service to all the functions of the Fund; and xvi. Performing any other lawful duties incidental to the
  234. 234. functions of the Finance and Administration Department as approved by the Advisory Board. 7.3.4 Audit Department The Audit Department services shall be responsible for: i. Formulation and implementation of internal control systems; ii. Carrying out timely and continuous audits, verifying and monitoring all financial transactions; iii. Reviewing and ensuring adequacy of accounting systems and making appropriate recommendations; Women Enterprise Fund Strategic Plan 2009
  235. 235. -2012 47
  236. 236. iv. Monitoring and evaluating processes and procedures of loan approvals, disbursement, usage, repayment and banking of cash; v. Vouching and monitoring expenditure; vi. Risk management; vii. Conducting investigations of special cases and making appropriate recommendations; viii.Preparing monthly audit reports, monthly loan reports, reconciliation reports and performance reports; ix. Carrying out physical inspections of the Fund”s decentralised offices to ascertain compliance to the requirements;
  237. 237. x. Carrying out compliance tests on various aspects of operations against the laid down internal control systems; xi. Ensuring accuracy of internal management reports; xii. Liaising with the external auditors; and xiii.Performing any other lawful duties incidental to the functions of the Audit Department as approved by the Advisory Board. 7.3.5 Legal Department The Legal Department shall be responsible for the following: i. Formulation, interpretation and

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