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Welcome
 Croeso
CARDIFF DEPOSIT
                        Local Development Plan
                        2006 - 2021




                   ...
Cardiff
                                                                       Civic
                        CARDIFF DEPOS...
18th & 20th May 2009 6.15pm
Committee Rooms,                 Frameworks for urban                                      Tra...
Session 1
Session 1
- What the LDP says about housing and
urban design
- Keynote: John Punter: Urban design
and housing
- Discussion...
Session 2
Session 2
- What the LDP says about work and
the economy
- Keynote: presentation from Ideopolis -
The Work Foundation
- Di...
The LDP “Vision”
The LDP “Vision”
To ensure Cardiff is a world class
European capital city with an
exceptional quality of life and at the
h...
Economic Vision
Economic Vision
To ensure that Cardiff, as a competitive
international capital city, is an inclusive,
vibrant and thriving...
Social Vision
Social Vision
To create a safe, healthy and learning
community which celebrates
diversity and promotes genuine
opportuniti...
Environmental
Vision
Environmental
Vision
To ensure Cardiff is a clean, safe and
attractive environment which people
can enjoy and care for at ...
Strategic objectives to deliver the
vision
Strategic objectives to deliver the
vision
 Mitigate and adapt to climate change and set high standards for
 sustainable d...
Strategic objectives to deliver the
vision
 Mitigate and adapt to climate change and set high standards for
 sustainable d...
Strategic objectives to deliver the
vision
 Mitigate and adapt to climate change and set high standards for
 sustainable d...
Strategic objectives to deliver the
vision
 Mitigate and adapt to climate change and set high standards for
 sustainable d...
Strategic objectives to deliver the
vision
 Mitigate and adapt to climate change and set high standards for
 sustainable d...
Strategic objectives to deliver the
vision
 Mitigate and adapt to climate change and set high standards for
 sustainable d...
Strategic objectives to deliver the
vision
 Mitigate and adapt to climate change and set high standards for
 sustainable d...
LDP on:
Urban design and housing
LDP on:
Urban design and housing
Policy summary from LDP
Policy summary from LDP
 High growth housing targets
 to match projected
 employment growth
Policy summary from LDP
 High growth housing targets
 to match projected
 employment growth
  40% affordable, full range/
...
Policy summary from LDP
 High growth housing targets
 to match projected
 employment growth
  40% affordable, full range/
...
Policy summary from LDP
 High growth housing targets
 to match projected
 employment growth
  40% affordable, full range/
...
Policy summary from LDP
 High growth housing targets    2021 - housing will be
 to match projected
 employment growth
  40...
Policy summary from LDP
 High growth housing targets    2021 - housing will be
 to match projected
                       ...
Policy summary from LDP
 High growth housing targets    2021 - housing will be
 to match projected
                       ...
Policy summary from LDP
 High growth housing targets    2021 - housing will be
 to match projected
                       ...
Housing growth
Housing growth
 27,442 new dwellings average 1,829 pa
Housing growth
 27,442 new dwellings average 1,829 pa
  this is higher than 5 year average 1,811
Housing growth
 27,442 new dwellings average 1,829 pa
  this is higher than 5 year average 1,811
  significantly higher tha...
Housing growth
 27,442 new dwellings average 1,829 pa
  this is higher than 5 year average 1,811
  significantly higher tha...
Housing growth
 27,442 new dwellings average 1,829 pa
  this is higher than 5 year average 1,811
  significantly higher tha...
Housing growth
 27,442 new dwellings average 1,829 pa
  this is higher than 5 year average 1,811
  significantly higher tha...
Housing growth
 27,442 new dwellings average 1,829 pa
  this is higher than 5 year average 1,811
  significantly higher tha...
Community safety and creating a
safe environment
Community safety and creating a
safe environment
 All new development shall be designed to promote a safe and secure
 envi...
Community safety and creating a
safe environment
 All new development shall be designed to promote a safe and secure
 envi...
Community safety and creating a
safe environment
 All new development shall be designed to promote a safe and secure
 envi...
Community safety and creating a
safe environment
 All new development shall be designed to promote a safe and secure
 envi...
Community safety and creating a
safe environment
 All new development shall be designed to promote a safe and secure
 envi...
Community safety and creating a
safe environment
 All new development shall be designed to promote a safe and secure
 envi...
Keynote by John Punter:
Urban design and housing
Keynote by John Punter:
Urban design and housing
Discussion: Urban design and
housing
Discussion: Urban design and
housing
Break
20 mins!
LDP on: Work and economy
LDP on: Work and economy
Policy summary from LDP
Policy summary from LDP
 Jobs are 88% service sector
 - 25% business & financial
Policy summary from LDP
 Jobs are 88% service sector
 - 25% business & financial
 Planned city office
 development for 20k j...
Policy summary from LDP
 Jobs are 88% service sector
 - 25% business & financial
 Planned city office
 development for 20k j...
Policy summary from LDP
 Jobs are 88% service sector
 - 25% business & financial
 Planned city office
 development for 20k j...
Policy summary from LDP
 Jobs are 88% service sector      Small, green technology site
 - 25% business & financial
 Planned...
Policy summary from LDP
 Jobs are 88% service sector      Small, green technology site
 - 25% business & financial
        ...
Policy summary from LDP
 Jobs are 88% service sector      Small, green technology site
 - 25% business & financial
        ...
Policy summary from LDP
 Jobs are 88% service sector      Small, green technology site
 - 25% business & financial
        ...
Policy summary from LDP
 Jobs are 88% service sector      Small, green technology site
 - 25% business & financial
        ...
Policy summary from LDP
 Jobs are 88% service sector      Small, green technology site
 - 25% business & financial
        ...
Delivering sustainable growth
Delivering sustainable growth
  Support the development of Cardiff as the heart of a sustainable
  competitive and integra...
Delivering sustainable growth
  Support the development of Cardiff as the heart of a sustainable
  competitive and integra...
Delivering sustainable growth
  Support the development of Cardiff as the heart of a sustainable
  competitive and integra...
Delivering sustainable growth
continued
Delivering sustainable growth
continued
  Ensure a range and choice of employment land and business
  premises is provided...
Delivering sustainable growth
continued
  Ensure a range and choice of employment land and business
  premises is provided...
Delivering sustainable growth
continued
  Ensure a range and choice of employment land and business
  premises is provided...
Capacity
Capacity
  there could be 400,00 sq m of office space developed in Bay and
  south Cardiff - for 20,000 employees
Capacity
  there could be 400,00 sq m of office space developed in Bay and
  south Cardiff - for 20,000 employees
  three h...
Capacity
  there could be 400,00 sq m of office space developed in Bay and
  south Cardiff - for 20,000 employees
  three h...
Capacity
  there could be 400,00 sq m of office space developed in Bay and
  south Cardiff - for 20,000 employees
  three h...
Capacity
  there could be 400,00 sq m of office space developed in Bay and
  south Cardiff - for 20,000 employees
  three h...
Employment growth
Employment growth
  The LDP would accommodate the 10.7% growth in jobs in Cardiff
  (23,200 jobs), forecast by Cambridge E...
Employment growth
  The LDP would accommodate the 10.7% growth in jobs in Cardiff
  (23,200 jobs), forecast by Cambridge E...
Retail growth
  Given the level of recent and current retail development in the city
  (90,000 sq m at St David's 2), it i...
Thoughts on Work and economy
- Ideopolis/Work Foundation
Thoughts on Work and economy
- Ideopolis/Work Foundation
Changing Working Patterns

Findings from independent research conducted by The Work
Foundation, supported by BT
‘New’ and ‘old’ technologies at work




© The Work Foundation.
                                       Base: All (1243)
New technologies are providing additional ways to
communicate




© The Work Foundation.
Employees use different communication tools for
different relationships and tasks




© The Work Foundation.
Relationships at work matter to job satisfaction – but
friendships don’t rely on working in the same place…




© The Work...
Relationships at work matter to job satisfaction – but
friendships don’t rely on working in the same place…
              ...
Relationships at work matter to job satisfaction – but
friendships don’t rely on working in the same place…
              ...
Relationships at work matter to job satisfaction – but
friendships don’t rely on working in the same place…
              ...
Relationships at work matter to job satisfaction – but
friendships don’t rely on working in the same place…
              ...
Relationships at work matter to job satisfaction – but
friendships don’t rely on working in the same place…
              ...
Relationships at work matter to job satisfaction – but
friendships don’t rely on working in the same place…
              ...
Relationships at work matter to job satisfaction – but
friendships don’t rely on working in the same place…
              ...
Working relationships are the most important
aspect of organisational culture




© The Work Foundation.
Working relationships are the most important
aspect of organisational culture




© The Work Foundation.
Working relationships are the most important
aspect of organisational culture




© The Work Foundation.
Working relationships are the most important
aspect of organisational culture




© The Work Foundation.
Technology and work




© The Work Foundation.
Technology and work

• Technology is a new communication tool; it is not technology that
  makes the difference but how it...
Technology and work

• Technology is a new communication tool; it is not technology that
  makes the difference but how it...
Technology and work

• Technology is a new communication tool; it is not technology that
  makes the difference but how it...
Technology and work

• Technology is a new communication tool; it is not technology that
  makes the difference but how it...
Technology and work

• Technology is a new communication tool; it is not technology that
  makes the difference but how it...
Technology and work

• Technology is a new communication tool; it is not technology that
  makes the difference but how it...
Technology and work

• Technology is a new communication tool; it is not technology that
  makes the difference but how it...
Technology and work

• Technology is a new communication tool; it is not technology that
  makes the difference but how it...
Technology and work

• Technology is a new communication tool; it is not technology that
  makes the difference but how it...
Ongoing importance of place: Geography of Knowledge
Economy
                               % Employment in knowledge-
    ...
Ongoing importance of place: Geography of Knowledge
Economy
                               % Employment in knowledge-
    ...
In summary - my notes




© The Work Foundation.
In summary - my notes


• Work has largely changed from post industrial to knowledge economy -
  plus the supporting servi...
In summary - my notes


• Work has largely changed from post industrial to knowledge economy -
  plus the supporting servi...
In summary - my notes


• Work has largely changed from post industrial to knowledge economy -
  plus the supporting servi...
In summary - my notes


• Work has largely changed from post industrial to knowledge economy -
  plus the supporting servi...
In summary - my notes


• Work has largely changed from post industrial to knowledge economy -
  plus the supporting servi...
In summary - my notes


• Work has largely changed from post industrial to knowledge economy -
  plus the supporting servi...
In summary - my notes


• Work has largely changed from post industrial to knowledge economy -
  plus the supporting servi...
Discussion: Work & Economy
Discussion: Work & Economy
5 minute
 sum up
Next steps ...
  Cardiff Civic Society
   will document the key points from these sessions
   make inputs on the topics to...
Discussing the local development plan

A plan for Cardiff?
Part 2:
 Wednesday,
                Cardiff
same time and   Civic
    place.
  Transport,
                Society
 Environ...
Part 1 Cardiff Local Development Plan session 1
Part 1 Cardiff Local Development Plan session 1
Part 1 Cardiff Local Development Plan session 1
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Cardiff Civic Society (www.cardiffcivicsociety.org) arranged two public consultation events at Cardiff University in May 2009. This presentation covered how the LDP would affect housing and work and the economy. There is a companion presentation for the second meeting.

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  • BT supported The Work Foundation to conduct research on how technology was affecting relationships at work.

    This was because they recognised that the UK economy has evolved from one dominated by basic manufacturing to becoming what is often called a ‘knowledge economy’. There are more women in the workforce, and the workforce is also more ethnically diverse than it has ever been. Technology has underpinned the changes and revolutionised the world of business. Use of computers and communications devices in a work context has changed business models, relationships at work and relationships with customers.

    I’m going to present a snapshot of the findings we gained through conducting interviews with academics, leading thinkers and organisations, which informed a survey of 1243 people.
  • The vast majority of people have access to ‘older’ technologies such as desktop computers, email and the internet at work
    BUT: 8 per cent of respondents continue not to have any access to even these technologies at work.

    Nearly half of respondents (45 per cent) have access to and use one or more forms of new technology a day at work
    BUT Some of the ‘newer’ technologies are less widespread: the least widespread technologies at work are Virtual World Technologies (used by 3 per cent of respondents), Miniblogs (4 per cent), Social Networking (13 per cent), Blogs (13 per cent) and Wikis (18 per cent).

    Access to new technologies varies by sector: IT, Telecommunications and Media and Leisure businesses are most likely to offer access, whilst Transport & Logistics, Retail and Public Sector organisations are least likely to do so

    Most people started using technologies at home before they used them at work
    The majority of respondents have been using desktops, laptops, mobiles, email, the internet, instant messaging, wikis, social networks, virtual world technologies and blogs for longer at home than at work.
    The exceptions - videoconferencing, teleconferencing, PDAs, professional networks and Unified Communications – all have much clearer applications at work than at home

    Organisations may be missing an opportunity to capitalise upon these skills in the workplace
  • Additionality: Technologies are not replacing traditional methods of communication but instead complementing them.
    Technologies have not replaced face to face contact: 52 per cent of respondents spend more than three hours each day talking face to face.
    People spend more time in their average working day using old technologies: 38% of respondents spend more than 3 hours a day sending and responding to emails and 24% spend more than 3 hours a day using the internet
    But new technologies are being used: of those who have access to instant messaging, 9 per cent say they use it for more than 3 hours each day. 7 per cent of those with access to professional networks and 6 per cent who have access to social networks at work also spend more than three hours using them on an average working day.
  • Use of new technologies is associated with confidence in general. Those who access and use one or more new technologies per day at work have significantly more confidence in interpreting people’s thoughts and emotions in face to face meetings than those who do not use new technologies. People who are more confident in communication in general may be more adventurous about using new technologies and those who are not may stick to the ways they know best.
    People using new technologies are also selecting which types of communication to use for different relationships. For example, over two thirds (69 per cent) of those with access to instant messaging use it to contact their immediate colleagues, but only 19 per cent would use instant messaging to contact senior managers.
    New technologies are also being used to interact with clients: for example 12 per cent of the 407 people with access to instant messaging and 14% of the 226 people with access to professional networks at work use these tools to contact clients,
    New technologies are clearly being used to support personal relationships: 52 per cent of those with access to social networking, 20 per cent with access to blogs and 20 per cent with access to instant messaging use it to keep in touch with personal and social contacts not connected to work. This may mirror their use of new technologies in their personal lives.
    People also select different technologies for different tasks. For example six in ten (61 per cent) of the 407 people with access to instant messaging to share information internally but only 15 per cent use it to manage others and 11 per cent use it to manage conflict.
  • Relationships matter: in other words, being satisfied with relationships at work makes it much more likely that an individual will also be satisfied with their job
    Most people (76%) still work at a single company premises: where people work has not changed as much as is sometime thought, but nearly a quarter of respondents do not work at a single company premises(14 per cent mainly work in multiple locations, 5 per cent at a mix of company premises and home and 2 per cent mainly at home).
    Most people still work in the same place as their colleagues: Similarly, we found that whilst nearly two thirds of people (63 per cent) worked in the same company premises as their immediate colleagues,a significant minority - nearly two in ten (19 per cent) – of people’s colleagues work in multiple different locations
    Work friendships are not reliant on working in the same place: nearly two thirds of respondents disagreed with the statement that ’most of their friends work in the same physical place as them’.

    RESEARCH NOTES
    Measuring social capital: our survey measured social capital by responses to three questions:
    * I feel treated fairly by others at work;
    * Work colleagues take a personal interest in me;
    * My supervisor always considers my best interests when making decisions that concern me.

    Measuring job satisfaction: our survey measured job satisfaction by satisfaction ratings for five related areas:
    * Pay;
    * Job Security;
    * The actual work itself;
    * The sense of achievement you get from your job;
    * Hours worked.
  • Relationships matter: in other words, being satisfied with relationships at work makes it much more likely that an individual will also be satisfied with their job
    Most people (76%) still work at a single company premises: where people work has not changed as much as is sometime thought, but nearly a quarter of respondents do not work at a single company premises(14 per cent mainly work in multiple locations, 5 per cent at a mix of company premises and home and 2 per cent mainly at home).
    Most people still work in the same place as their colleagues: Similarly, we found that whilst nearly two thirds of people (63 per cent) worked in the same company premises as their immediate colleagues,a significant minority - nearly two in ten (19 per cent) – of people’s colleagues work in multiple different locations
    Work friendships are not reliant on working in the same place: nearly two thirds of respondents disagreed with the statement that ’most of their friends work in the same physical place as them’.

    RESEARCH NOTES
    Measuring social capital: our survey measured social capital by responses to three questions:
    * I feel treated fairly by others at work;
    * Work colleagues take a personal interest in me;
    * My supervisor always considers my best interests when making decisions that concern me.

    Measuring job satisfaction: our survey measured job satisfaction by satisfaction ratings for five related areas:
    * Pay;
    * Job Security;
    * The actual work itself;
    * The sense of achievement you get from your job;
    * Hours worked.
  • Relationships matter: in other words, being satisfied with relationships at work makes it much more likely that an individual will also be satisfied with their job
    Most people (76%) still work at a single company premises: where people work has not changed as much as is sometime thought, but nearly a quarter of respondents do not work at a single company premises(14 per cent mainly work in multiple locations, 5 per cent at a mix of company premises and home and 2 per cent mainly at home).
    Most people still work in the same place as their colleagues: Similarly, we found that whilst nearly two thirds of people (63 per cent) worked in the same company premises as their immediate colleagues,a significant minority - nearly two in ten (19 per cent) – of people’s colleagues work in multiple different locations
    Work friendships are not reliant on working in the same place: nearly two thirds of respondents disagreed with the statement that ’most of their friends work in the same physical place as them’.

    RESEARCH NOTES
    Measuring social capital: our survey measured social capital by responses to three questions:
    * I feel treated fairly by others at work;
    * Work colleagues take a personal interest in me;
    * My supervisor always considers my best interests when making decisions that concern me.

    Measuring job satisfaction: our survey measured job satisfaction by satisfaction ratings for five related areas:
    * Pay;
    * Job Security;
    * The actual work itself;
    * The sense of achievement you get from your job;
    * Hours worked.
  • Relationships matter: in other words, being satisfied with relationships at work makes it much more likely that an individual will also be satisfied with their job
    Most people (76%) still work at a single company premises: where people work has not changed as much as is sometime thought, but nearly a quarter of respondents do not work at a single company premises(14 per cent mainly work in multiple locations, 5 per cent at a mix of company premises and home and 2 per cent mainly at home).
    Most people still work in the same place as their colleagues: Similarly, we found that whilst nearly two thirds of people (63 per cent) worked in the same company premises as their immediate colleagues,a significant minority - nearly two in ten (19 per cent) – of people’s colleagues work in multiple different locations
    Work friendships are not reliant on working in the same place: nearly two thirds of respondents disagreed with the statement that ’most of their friends work in the same physical place as them’.

    RESEARCH NOTES
    Measuring social capital: our survey measured social capital by responses to three questions:
    * I feel treated fairly by others at work;
    * Work colleagues take a personal interest in me;
    * My supervisor always considers my best interests when making decisions that concern me.

    Measuring job satisfaction: our survey measured job satisfaction by satisfaction ratings for five related areas:
    * Pay;
    * Job Security;
    * The actual work itself;
    * The sense of achievement you get from your job;
    * Hours worked.
  • Relationships matter: in other words, being satisfied with relationships at work makes it much more likely that an individual will also be satisfied with their job
    Most people (76%) still work at a single company premises: where people work has not changed as much as is sometime thought, but nearly a quarter of respondents do not work at a single company premises(14 per cent mainly work in multiple locations, 5 per cent at a mix of company premises and home and 2 per cent mainly at home).
    Most people still work in the same place as their colleagues: Similarly, we found that whilst nearly two thirds of people (63 per cent) worked in the same company premises as their immediate colleagues,a significant minority - nearly two in ten (19 per cent) – of people’s colleagues work in multiple different locations
    Work friendships are not reliant on working in the same place: nearly two thirds of respondents disagreed with the statement that ’most of their friends work in the same physical place as them’.

    RESEARCH NOTES
    Measuring social capital: our survey measured social capital by responses to three questions:
    * I feel treated fairly by others at work;
    * Work colleagues take a personal interest in me;
    * My supervisor always considers my best interests when making decisions that concern me.

    Measuring job satisfaction: our survey measured job satisfaction by satisfaction ratings for five related areas:
    * Pay;
    * Job Security;
    * The actual work itself;
    * The sense of achievement you get from your job;
    * Hours worked.
  • Relationships matter: in other words, being satisfied with relationships at work makes it much more likely that an individual will also be satisfied with their job
    Most people (76%) still work at a single company premises: where people work has not changed as much as is sometime thought, but nearly a quarter of respondents do not work at a single company premises(14 per cent mainly work in multiple locations, 5 per cent at a mix of company premises and home and 2 per cent mainly at home).
    Most people still work in the same place as their colleagues: Similarly, we found that whilst nearly two thirds of people (63 per cent) worked in the same company premises as their immediate colleagues,a significant minority - nearly two in ten (19 per cent) – of people’s colleagues work in multiple different locations
    Work friendships are not reliant on working in the same place: nearly two thirds of respondents disagreed with the statement that ’most of their friends work in the same physical place as them’.

    RESEARCH NOTES
    Measuring social capital: our survey measured social capital by responses to three questions:
    * I feel treated fairly by others at work;
    * Work colleagues take a personal interest in me;
    * My supervisor always considers my best interests when making decisions that concern me.

    Measuring job satisfaction: our survey measured job satisfaction by satisfaction ratings for five related areas:
    * Pay;
    * Job Security;
    * The actual work itself;
    * The sense of achievement you get from your job;
    * Hours worked.
  • Relationships matter: in other words, being satisfied with relationships at work makes it much more likely that an individual will also be satisfied with their job
    Most people (76%) still work at a single company premises: where people work has not changed as much as is sometime thought, but nearly a quarter of respondents do not work at a single company premises(14 per cent mainly work in multiple locations, 5 per cent at a mix of company premises and home and 2 per cent mainly at home).
    Most people still work in the same place as their colleagues: Similarly, we found that whilst nearly two thirds of people (63 per cent) worked in the same company premises as their immediate colleagues,a significant minority - nearly two in ten (19 per cent) – of people’s colleagues work in multiple different locations
    Work friendships are not reliant on working in the same place: nearly two thirds of respondents disagreed with the statement that ’most of their friends work in the same physical place as them’.

    RESEARCH NOTES
    Measuring social capital: our survey measured social capital by responses to three questions:
    * I feel treated fairly by others at work;
    * Work colleagues take a personal interest in me;
    * My supervisor always considers my best interests when making decisions that concern me.

    Measuring job satisfaction: our survey measured job satisfaction by satisfaction ratings for five related areas:
    * Pay;
    * Job Security;
    * The actual work itself;
    * The sense of achievement you get from your job;
    * Hours worked.
  • There are significant differences between the types of organisation people say they work for and the type they would like to work for
    Most people say their organisation is rule-bound: 85 per cent of respondents characterise their organisation’s culture as being based on formal rules and policies, but only 6 per cent of respondents would prefer to work in this type of organisation.
    But most people would prefer to work for a different type of organisation: most people (60%) would prefer to work for an organisation characterised by a culture of loyalty and mutual trust.
    People who have access to newer technologies are less likely to characterise their organisations as formal and rule-bound, and more likely to trust their colleagues to do their jobs properly BUT having new technologies does not automatically mean this will happen
    Access to new technologies and trust of colleagues: people those who have access to and use one or more new technologies a day at work are also more likely to trust their immediate colleagues to do their job properly
    VERY IMPORTANT: the cause and effect issue: it is not possible on the basis of this survey to say that access to new technologies leads to or creates less formal organisational cultures, or vice versa. There is an observed relationship between both factors, but we cannot identify cause and effect from the survey data
    Possibilities: it may be that new technologies provide ways for people to develop working relationships that create a different and more flexible culture that feels less rule-bound, or that less formal organisations are more open to new forms of technology
    Similarly: it is possible that new technologies may support closer working relationships and facilitate trust in the workplace





    RESEARCH NOTES
    Organisational Cultures
    The survey assessed organisational culture based on four conceptions of organisational culture that have been rigorously tested over a series of surveys. On this basis the survey asked respondents whether the organisation they work for is characterised by:
    * Loyalty and mutual trust. Commitment to this organization runs high.
    * Commitment to innovation and development. There is an emphasis on being on the cutting edge.
    * An emphasis on achievement and goal accomplishment. Aggressiveness and winning are common themes.
    * Formal rules and policies. Maintaining a smooth-running organization is important.
    Respondents were then asked which type of organisation people would prefer to work in the most.
  • There are significant differences between the types of organisation people say they work for and the type they would like to work for
    Most people say their organisation is rule-bound: 85 per cent of respondents characterise their organisation’s culture as being based on formal rules and policies, but only 6 per cent of respondents would prefer to work in this type of organisation.
    But most people would prefer to work for a different type of organisation: most people (60%) would prefer to work for an organisation characterised by a culture of loyalty and mutual trust.
    People who have access to newer technologies are less likely to characterise their organisations as formal and rule-bound, and more likely to trust their colleagues to do their jobs properly BUT having new technologies does not automatically mean this will happen
    Access to new technologies and trust of colleagues: people those who have access to and use one or more new technologies a day at work are also more likely to trust their immediate colleagues to do their job properly
    VERY IMPORTANT: the cause and effect issue: it is not possible on the basis of this survey to say that access to new technologies leads to or creates less formal organisational cultures, or vice versa. There is an observed relationship between both factors, but we cannot identify cause and effect from the survey data
    Possibilities: it may be that new technologies provide ways for people to develop working relationships that create a different and more flexible culture that feels less rule-bound, or that less formal organisations are more open to new forms of technology
    Similarly: it is possible that new technologies may support closer working relationships and facilitate trust in the workplace





    RESEARCH NOTES
    Organisational Cultures
    The survey assessed organisational culture based on four conceptions of organisational culture that have been rigorously tested over a series of surveys. On this basis the survey asked respondents whether the organisation they work for is characterised by:
    * Loyalty and mutual trust. Commitment to this organization runs high.
    * Commitment to innovation and development. There is an emphasis on being on the cutting edge.
    * An emphasis on achievement and goal accomplishment. Aggressiveness and winning are common themes.
    * Formal rules and policies. Maintaining a smooth-running organization is important.
    Respondents were then asked which type of organisation people would prefer to work in the most.
  • Working relationships matter. The stronger people’s social relationships and the more they feel trusted and trust others, the higher their job satisfaction is likely to be.
    New technologies are having an impact on the workplace: not by supplanting traditional forms of communications but by creating new ways to interact with people. People still talk face to face but it is clear from our work that people do not need to work in the same place in order to develop workplace friendships. Access to new technologies provides new ways to communicate with people, ways often familiar to people from using social media in their personal lives. And people are responding to having access to new technologies by making choices about what form of technology to use for different types of interaction: instant messenger is not seen as appropriate to contact senior managers, for example, but it is seen as appropriate for contacting immediate colleagues.
    Organisations need to recognise that people prefer to work for places workplaces characterised by strong working relationships and a focus on outputs rather than processes. In the current economic climate there is likely to be a temptation to focus on formal rules and processes. But focusing on outputs, supporting strong working relationships and creating a climate of trust and autonomy is likely to pay dividends by helping people forge closer relationships with colleague and customers and to be happier at work. This does not mean rules should disappear: a culture of loyalty and a focus on outputs can and should still be supported by processes such as performance management. But it does mean that organisations should be thinking much more about supporting strong working relationships to help deliver innovation, ideas and a happier workforce.
    New technologies affect how people view their organisational culture. People with access to new technologies are more likely to characterise their organisations as having a culture of mutual trust and loyalty, and more likely to trust their colleagues. This suggests that new technologies may be one way of enabling people to form strong working relationships and to keep in touch with one another day to day.
    Organisations need to think about how they can make best use of different forms of communication and different types of technology, old and new. This calls for managers to think innovatively about what tools to use to develop and sustain different relationships and to manage different situations, from dealing with conflict to having a chat. Old and new technologies can complement one another in helping organisations create the kind of culture that people prefer and the relationships that can help to sustain innovation and prosperity in a 21st century economy.
  • Working relationships matter. The stronger people’s social relationships and the more they feel trusted and trust others, the higher their job satisfaction is likely to be.
    New technologies are having an impact on the workplace: not by supplanting traditional forms of communications but by creating new ways to interact with people. People still talk face to face but it is clear from our work that people do not need to work in the same place in order to develop workplace friendships. Access to new technologies provides new ways to communicate with people, ways often familiar to people from using social media in their personal lives. And people are responding to having access to new technologies by making choices about what form of technology to use for different types of interaction: instant messenger is not seen as appropriate to contact senior managers, for example, but it is seen as appropriate for contacting immediate colleagues.
    Organisations need to recognise that people prefer to work for places workplaces characterised by strong working relationships and a focus on outputs rather than processes. In the current economic climate there is likely to be a temptation to focus on formal rules and processes. But focusing on outputs, supporting strong working relationships and creating a climate of trust and autonomy is likely to pay dividends by helping people forge closer relationships with colleague and customers and to be happier at work. This does not mean rules should disappear: a culture of loyalty and a focus on outputs can and should still be supported by processes such as performance management. But it does mean that organisations should be thinking much more about supporting strong working relationships to help deliver innovation, ideas and a happier workforce.
    New technologies affect how people view their organisational culture. People with access to new technologies are more likely to characterise their organisations as having a culture of mutual trust and loyalty, and more likely to trust their colleagues. This suggests that new technologies may be one way of enabling people to form strong working relationships and to keep in touch with one another day to day.
    Organisations need to think about how they can make best use of different forms of communication and different types of technology, old and new. This calls for managers to think innovatively about what tools to use to develop and sustain different relationships and to manage different situations, from dealing with conflict to having a chat. Old and new technologies can complement one another in helping organisations create the kind of culture that people prefer and the relationships that can help to sustain innovation and prosperity in a 21st century economy.
  • Working relationships matter. The stronger people’s social relationships and the more they feel trusted and trust others, the higher their job satisfaction is likely to be.
    New technologies are having an impact on the workplace: not by supplanting traditional forms of communications but by creating new ways to interact with people. People still talk face to face but it is clear from our work that people do not need to work in the same place in order to develop workplace friendships. Access to new technologies provides new ways to communicate with people, ways often familiar to people from using social media in their personal lives. And people are responding to having access to new technologies by making choices about what form of technology to use for different types of interaction: instant messenger is not seen as appropriate to contact senior managers, for example, but it is seen as appropriate for contacting immediate colleagues.
    Organisations need to recognise that people prefer to work for places workplaces characterised by strong working relationships and a focus on outputs rather than processes. In the current economic climate there is likely to be a temptation to focus on formal rules and processes. But focusing on outputs, supporting strong working relationships and creating a climate of trust and autonomy is likely to pay dividends by helping people forge closer relationships with colleague and customers and to be happier at work. This does not mean rules should disappear: a culture of loyalty and a focus on outputs can and should still be supported by processes such as performance management. But it does mean that organisations should be thinking much more about supporting strong working relationships to help deliver innovation, ideas and a happier workforce.
    New technologies affect how people view their organisational culture. People with access to new technologies are more likely to characterise their organisations as having a culture of mutual trust and loyalty, and more likely to trust their colleagues. This suggests that new technologies may be one way of enabling people to form strong working relationships and to keep in touch with one another day to day.
    Organisations need to think about how they can make best use of different forms of communication and different types of technology, old and new. This calls for managers to think innovatively about what tools to use to develop and sustain different relationships and to manage different situations, from dealing with conflict to having a chat. Old and new technologies can complement one another in helping organisations create the kind of culture that people prefer and the relationships that can help to sustain innovation and prosperity in a 21st century economy.
  • Working relationships matter. The stronger people’s social relationships and the more they feel trusted and trust others, the higher their job satisfaction is likely to be.
    New technologies are having an impact on the workplace: not by supplanting traditional forms of communications but by creating new ways to interact with people. People still talk face to face but it is clear from our work that people do not need to work in the same place in order to develop workplace friendships. Access to new technologies provides new ways to communicate with people, ways often familiar to people from using social media in their personal lives. And people are responding to having access to new technologies by making choices about what form of technology to use for different types of interaction: instant messenger is not seen as appropriate to contact senior managers, for example, but it is seen as appropriate for contacting immediate colleagues.
    Organisations need to recognise that people prefer to work for places workplaces characterised by strong working relationships and a focus on outputs rather than processes. In the current economic climate there is likely to be a temptation to focus on formal rules and processes. But focusing on outputs, supporting strong working relationships and creating a climate of trust and autonomy is likely to pay dividends by helping people forge closer relationships with colleague and customers and to be happier at work. This does not mean rules should disappear: a culture of loyalty and a focus on outputs can and should still be supported by processes such as performance management. But it does mean that organisations should be thinking much more about supporting strong working relationships to help deliver innovation, ideas and a happier workforce.
    New technologies affect how people view their organisational culture. People with access to new technologies are more likely to characterise their organisations as having a culture of mutual trust and loyalty, and more likely to trust their colleagues. This suggests that new technologies may be one way of enabling people to form strong working relationships and to keep in touch with one another day to day.
    Organisations need to think about how they can make best use of different forms of communication and different types of technology, old and new. This calls for managers to think innovatively about what tools to use to develop and sustain different relationships and to manage different situations, from dealing with conflict to having a chat. Old and new technologies can complement one another in helping organisations create the kind of culture that people prefer and the relationships that can help to sustain innovation and prosperity in a 21st century economy.
  • Working relationships matter. The stronger people’s social relationships and the more they feel trusted and trust others, the higher their job satisfaction is likely to be.
    New technologies are having an impact on the workplace: not by supplanting traditional forms of communications but by creating new ways to interact with people. People still talk face to face but it is clear from our work that people do not need to work in the same place in order to develop workplace friendships. Access to new technologies provides new ways to communicate with people, ways often familiar to people from using social media in their personal lives. And people are responding to having access to new technologies by making choices about what form of technology to use for different types of interaction: instant messenger is not seen as appropriate to contact senior managers, for example, but it is seen as appropriate for contacting immediate colleagues.
    Organisations need to recognise that people prefer to work for places workplaces characterised by strong working relationships and a focus on outputs rather than processes. In the current economic climate there is likely to be a temptation to focus on formal rules and processes. But focusing on outputs, supporting strong working relationships and creating a climate of trust and autonomy is likely to pay dividends by helping people forge closer relationships with colleague and customers and to be happier at work. This does not mean rules should disappear: a culture of loyalty and a focus on outputs can and should still be supported by processes such as performance management. But it does mean that organisations should be thinking much more about supporting strong working relationships to help deliver innovation, ideas and a happier workforce.
    New technologies affect how people view their organisational culture. People with access to new technologies are more likely to characterise their organisations as having a culture of mutual trust and loyalty, and more likely to trust their colleagues. This suggests that new technologies may be one way of enabling people to form strong working relationships and to keep in touch with one another day to day.
    Organisations need to think about how they can make best use of different forms of communication and different types of technology, old and new. This calls for managers to think innovatively about what tools to use to develop and sustain different relationships and to manage different situations, from dealing with conflict to having a chat. Old and new technologies can complement one another in helping organisations create the kind of culture that people prefer and the relationships that can help to sustain innovation and prosperity in a 21st century economy.
  • Working relationships matter. The stronger people’s social relationships and the more they feel trusted and trust others, the higher their job satisfaction is likely to be.
    New technologies are having an impact on the workplace: not by supplanting traditional forms of communications but by creating new ways to interact with people. People still talk face to face but it is clear from our work that people do not need to work in the same place in order to develop workplace friendships. Access to new technologies provides new ways to communicate with people, ways often familiar to people from using social media in their personal lives. And people are responding to having access to new technologies by making choices about what form of technology to use for different types of interaction: instant messenger is not seen as appropriate to contact senior managers, for example, but it is seen as appropriate for contacting immediate colleagues.
    Organisations need to recognise that people prefer to work for places workplaces characterised by strong working relationships and a focus on outputs rather than processes. In the current economic climate there is likely to be a temptation to focus on formal rules and processes. But focusing on outputs, supporting strong working relationships and creating a climate of trust and autonomy is likely to pay dividends by helping people forge closer relationships with colleague and customers and to be happier at work. This does not mean rules should disappear: a culture of loyalty and a focus on outputs can and should still be supported by processes such as performance management. But it does mean that organisations should be thinking much more about supporting strong working relationships to help deliver innovation, ideas and a happier workforce.
    New technologies affect how people view their organisational culture. People with access to new technologies are more likely to characterise their organisations as having a culture of mutual trust and loyalty, and more likely to trust their colleagues. This suggests that new technologies may be one way of enabling people to form strong working relationships and to keep in touch with one another day to day.
    Organisations need to think about how they can make best use of different forms of communication and different types of technology, old and new. This calls for managers to think innovatively about what tools to use to develop and sustain different relationships and to manage different situations, from dealing with conflict to having a chat. Old and new technologies can complement one another in helping organisations create the kind of culture that people prefer and the relationships that can help to sustain innovation and prosperity in a 21st century economy.
  • Working relationships matter. The stronger people’s social relationships and the more they feel trusted and trust others, the higher their job satisfaction is likely to be.
    New technologies are having an impact on the workplace: not by supplanting traditional forms of communications but by creating new ways to interact with people. People still talk face to face but it is clear from our work that people do not need to work in the same place in order to develop workplace friendships. Access to new technologies provides new ways to communicate with people, ways often familiar to people from using social media in their personal lives. And people are responding to having access to new technologies by making choices about what form of technology to use for different types of interaction: instant messenger is not seen as appropriate to contact senior managers, for example, but it is seen as appropriate for contacting immediate colleagues.
    Organisations need to recognise that people prefer to work for places workplaces characterised by strong working relationships and a focus on outputs rather than processes. In the current economic climate there is likely to be a temptation to focus on formal rules and processes. But focusing on outputs, supporting strong working relationships and creating a climate of trust and autonomy is likely to pay dividends by helping people forge closer relationships with colleague and customers and to be happier at work. This does not mean rules should disappear: a culture of loyalty and a focus on outputs can and should still be supported by processes such as performance management. But it does mean that organisations should be thinking much more about supporting strong working relationships to help deliver innovation, ideas and a happier workforce.
    New technologies affect how people view their organisational culture. People with access to new technologies are more likely to characterise their organisations as having a culture of mutual trust and loyalty, and more likely to trust their colleagues. This suggests that new technologies may be one way of enabling people to form strong working relationships and to keep in touch with one another day to day.
    Organisations need to think about how they can make best use of different forms of communication and different types of technology, old and new. This calls for managers to think innovatively about what tools to use to develop and sustain different relationships and to manage different situations, from dealing with conflict to having a chat. Old and new technologies can complement one another in helping organisations create the kind of culture that people prefer and the relationships that can help to sustain innovation and prosperity in a 21st century economy.
  • Working relationships matter. The stronger people’s social relationships and the more they feel trusted and trust others, the higher their job satisfaction is likely to be.
    New technologies are having an impact on the workplace: not by supplanting traditional forms of communications but by creating new ways to interact with people. People still talk face to face but it is clear from our work that people do not need to work in the same place in order to develop workplace friendships. Access to new technologies provides new ways to communicate with people, ways often familiar to people from using social media in their personal lives. And people are responding to having access to new technologies by making choices about what form of technology to use for different types of interaction: instant messenger is not seen as appropriate to contact senior managers, for example, but it is seen as appropriate for contacting immediate colleagues.
    Organisations need to recognise that people prefer to work for places workplaces characterised by strong working relationships and a focus on outputs rather than processes. In the current economic climate there is likely to be a temptation to focus on formal rules and processes. But focusing on outputs, supporting strong working relationships and creating a climate of trust and autonomy is likely to pay dividends by helping people forge closer relationships with colleague and customers and to be happier at work. This does not mean rules should disappear: a culture of loyalty and a focus on outputs can and should still be supported by processes such as performance management. But it does mean that organisations should be thinking much more about supporting strong working relationships to help deliver innovation, ideas and a happier workforce.
    New technologies affect how people view their organisational culture. People with access to new technologies are more likely to characterise their organisations as having a culture of mutual trust and loyalty, and more likely to trust their colleagues. This suggests that new technologies may be one way of enabling people to form strong working relationships and to keep in touch with one another day to day.
    Organisations need to think about how they can make best use of different forms of communication and different types of technology, old and new. This calls for managers to think innovatively about what tools to use to develop and sustain different relationships and to manage different situations, from dealing with conflict to having a chat. Old and new technologies can complement one another in helping organisations create the kind of culture that people prefer and the relationships that can help to sustain innovation and prosperity in a 21st century economy.
  • Working relationships matter. The stronger people’s social relationships and the more they feel trusted and trust others, the higher their job satisfaction is likely to be.
    New technologies are having an impact on the workplace: not by supplanting traditional forms of communications but by creating new ways to interact with people. People still talk face to face but it is clear from our work that people do not need to work in the same place in order to develop workplace friendships. Access to new technologies provides new ways to communicate with people, ways often familiar to people from using social media in their personal lives. And people are responding to having access to new technologies by making choices about what form of technology to use for different types of interaction: instant messenger is not seen as appropriate to contact senior managers, for example, but it is seen as appropriate for contacting immediate colleagues.
    Organisations need to recognise that people prefer to work for places workplaces characterised by strong working relationships and a focus on outputs rather than processes. In the current economic climate there is likely to be a temptation to focus on formal rules and processes. But focusing on outputs, supporting strong working relationships and creating a climate of trust and autonomy is likely to pay dividends by helping people forge closer relationships with colleague and customers and to be happier at work. This does not mean rules should disappear: a culture of loyalty and a focus on outputs can and should still be supported by processes such as performance management. But it does mean that organisations should be thinking much more about supporting strong working relationships to help deliver innovation, ideas and a happier workforce.
    New technologies affect how people view their organisational culture. People with access to new technologies are more likely to characterise their organisations as having a culture of mutual trust and loyalty, and more likely to trust their colleagues. This suggests that new technologies may be one way of enabling people to form strong working relationships and to keep in touch with one another day to day.
    Organisations need to think about how they can make best use of different forms of communication and different types of technology, old and new. This calls for managers to think innovatively about what tools to use to develop and sustain different relationships and to manage different situations, from dealing with conflict to having a chat. Old and new technologies can complement one another in helping organisations create the kind of culture that people prefer and the relationships that can help to sustain innovation and prosperity in a 21st century economy.
  • It’s clear that these trends are not making place less important. Instead it seems to be becoming more important – the map above shows where the most productive industries (‘knowledge intensive industries) are located and it’s clear that this is in cities. Cities are becoming much more important economic drivers of the UK economy because they offer businesses access to consumers, specialist labour and opportunities to exchange ideas. The study of technology shows that it enables new ways of communicating but does not replace the importance of face to face communication.

    This suggests that:
    We should be making use of our city centres to create spaces that encourage networking and interaction
    We should not assume that technology will stop people wanting to work in cities – but it is likely to mean that people want to work in different ways
  • It’s clear that these trends are not making place less important. Instead it seems to be becoming more important – the map above shows where the most productive industries (‘knowledge intensive industries) are located and it’s clear that this is in cities. Cities are becoming much more important economic drivers of the UK economy because they offer businesses access to consumers, specialist labour and opportunities to exchange ideas. The study of technology shows that it enables new ways of communicating but does not replace the importance of face to face communication.

    This suggests that:
    We should be making use of our city centres to create spaces that encourage networking and interaction
    We should not assume that technology will stop people wanting to work in cities – but it is likely to mean that people want to work in different ways
  • It’s clear that these trends are not making place less important. Instead it seems to be becoming more important – the map above shows where the most productive industries (‘knowledge intensive industries) are located and it’s clear that this is in cities. Cities are becoming much more important economic drivers of the UK economy because they offer businesses access to consumers, specialist labour and opportunities to exchange ideas. The study of technology shows that it enables new ways of communicating but does not replace the importance of face to face communication.

    This suggests that:
    We should be making use of our city centres to create spaces that encourage networking and interaction
    We should not assume that technology will stop people wanting to work in cities – but it is likely to mean that people want to work in different ways
  • Transcript of "Part 1 Cardiff Local Development Plan session 1"

    1. 1. Welcome Croeso
    2. 2. CARDIFF DEPOSIT Local Development Plan 2006 - 2021 March 2009 Discussing the local development plan LDPCOVER_Master_23.3.09.indd 1 25/03/2009 14:38:21 A plan for Cardiff?
    3. 3. Cardiff Civic CARDIFF DEPOSIT Local Development Plan 2006 - 2021 Society March 2009 Discussing the local development plan LDPCOVER_Master_23.3.09.indd 1 25/03/2009 14:38:21 A plan for Cardiff?
    4. 4. 18th & 20th May 2009 6.15pm Committee Rooms, Frameworks for urban Transport that is A 21st century work Safeguarding the Glamorgan Building Cardiff living environment sustainable environment University sponsored by Keynote: Professor John Keynote: The Work Keynote: Professor Stuart Keynote: tba Cardiff Civic Society Punter, professor of Urban Foundation/Ideopolis - key Cole, professor of Design Cardiff University findings Transport Cardiff University Discussing the Local Development Plan A Plan for Cardiff? With two topics being covered on each Cardiff Civic Society is sponsoring two evening workshops where Cardiff residents, evening, participants will have covered four of local groups and experts can discuss the the major impact areas of the LDP: newly submitted Local Development Plan (LDP) in order to formulate comments to the Monday 18th May Council - which must be made by Frameworks for urban living, housing and 9th June 2009. communities The work environment for the next twenty Each of the four sessions will: years • outline from the LDP itself what the impacts would be if it is implemented as deposited Wednesday 20th May • have a keynote contribution outlining what Sustainable transport - systems and patterns some of the major future needs of people and for a changed world opportunities will be Maintaining our environment - the price of a • give an opportunity - in a facilitated discussion - to inform what submissions might carbon footprint be made during the LDP consultation period. Email: ka.allen@btinternet.com for details This is a Wordle (wordle.net) of the Cardiff LDP
    5. 5. Session 1
    6. 6. Session 1 - What the LDP says about housing and urban design - Keynote: John Punter: Urban design and housing - Discussion moderated by Neil Harris 7.30 pm - break for networking 20 minutes
    7. 7. Session 2
    8. 8. Session 2 - What the LDP says about work and the economy - Keynote: presentation from Ideopolis - The Work Foundation - Discussion moderated by Neil Harris - Final summation of both sessions
    9. 9. The LDP “Vision”
    10. 10. The LDP “Vision” To ensure Cardiff is a world class European capital city with an exceptional quality of life and at the heart of a competitive city region.
    11. 11. Economic Vision
    12. 12. Economic Vision To ensure that Cardiff, as a competitive international capital city, is an inclusive, vibrant and thriving city in which to live and work, with a skilled and creative workforce and a buoyant business environment
    13. 13. Social Vision
    14. 14. Social Vision To create a safe, healthy and learning community which celebrates diversity and promotes genuine opportunities for all.
    15. 15. Environmental Vision
    16. 16. Environmental Vision To ensure Cardiff is a clean, safe and attractive environment which people can enjoy and care for at a local and global level.
    17. 17. Strategic objectives to deliver the vision
    18. 18. Strategic objectives to deliver the vision Mitigate and adapt to climate change and set high standards for sustainable design
    19. 19. Strategic objectives to deliver the vision Mitigate and adapt to climate change and set high standards for sustainable design Deliver sustainable growth for Cardiff and the city-region
    20. 20. Strategic objectives to deliver the vision Mitigate and adapt to climate change and set high standards for sustainable design Deliver sustainable growth for Cardiff and the city-region Protect and enhance features of Cardiff’s natural and built heritage
    21. 21. Strategic objectives to deliver the vision Mitigate and adapt to climate change and set high standards for sustainable design Deliver sustainable growth for Cardiff and the city-region Protect and enhance features of Cardiff’s natural and built heritage Create sustainable communities and improve the quality of life
    22. 22. Strategic objectives to deliver the vision Mitigate and adapt to climate change and set high standards for sustainable design Deliver sustainable growth for Cardiff and the city-region Protect and enhance features of Cardiff’s natural and built heritage Create sustainable communities and improve the quality of life Protect natural resources and tackle pollution
    23. 23. Strategic objectives to deliver the vision Mitigate and adapt to climate change and set high standards for sustainable design Deliver sustainable growth for Cardiff and the city-region Protect and enhance features of Cardiff’s natural and built heritage Create sustainable communities and improve the quality of life Protect natural resources and tackle pollution Secure an adequate supply of minerals and reduce waste
    24. 24. Strategic objectives to deliver the vision Mitigate and adapt to climate change and set high standards for sustainable design Deliver sustainable growth for Cardiff and the city-region Protect and enhance features of Cardiff’s natural and built heritage Create sustainable communities and improve the quality of life Protect natural resources and tackle pollution Secure an adequate supply of minerals and reduce waste Secure Planning Obligations to deliver infrastructure and meet needs
    25. 25. LDP on: Urban design and housing
    26. 26. LDP on: Urban design and housing
    27. 27. Policy summary from LDP
    28. 28. Policy summary from LDP High growth housing targets to match projected employment growth
    29. 29. Policy summary from LDP High growth housing targets to match projected employment growth 40% affordable, full range/ mix
    30. 30. Policy summary from LDP High growth housing targets to match projected employment growth 40% affordable, full range/ mix attention to safety
    31. 31. Policy summary from LDP High growth housing targets to match projected employment growth 40% affordable, full range/ mix attention to safety predominantly using brownfield sites
    32. 32. Policy summary from LDP High growth housing targets 2021 - housing will be to match projected employment growth 40% affordable, full range/ mix attention to safety predominantly using brownfield sites
    33. 33. Policy summary from LDP High growth housing targets 2021 - housing will be to match projected at increasing high density employment growth 40% affordable, full range/ mix attention to safety predominantly using brownfield sites
    34. 34. Policy summary from LDP High growth housing targets 2021 - housing will be to match projected at increasing high density employment growth more affordable 40% affordable, full range/ mix attention to safety predominantly using brownfield sites
    35. 35. Policy summary from LDP High growth housing targets 2021 - housing will be to match projected at increasing high density employment growth more affordable 40% affordable, full range/ mix give attention to design - layout - safety attention to safety predominantly using brownfield sites
    36. 36. Housing growth
    37. 37. Housing growth 27,442 new dwellings average 1,829 pa
    38. 38. Housing growth 27,442 new dwellings average 1,829 pa this is higher than 5 year average 1,811
    39. 39. Housing growth 27,442 new dwellings average 1,829 pa this is higher than 5 year average 1,811 significantly higher than 10 year average of 1,513
    40. 40. Housing growth 27,442 new dwellings average 1,829 pa this is higher than 5 year average 1,811 significantly higher than 10 year average of 1,513 “Current evidence suggests a significant decrease in units to be completed due to economic downturn”
    41. 41. Housing growth 27,442 new dwellings average 1,829 pa this is higher than 5 year average 1,811 significantly higher than 10 year average of 1,513 “Current evidence suggests a significant decrease in units to be completed due to economic downturn” proposed growth is:
    42. 42. Housing growth 27,442 new dwellings average 1,829 pa this is higher than 5 year average 1,811 significantly higher than 10 year average of 1,513 “Current evidence suggests a significant decrease in units to be completed due to economic downturn” proposed growth is: below level in Cardiff 2008 LHMA
    43. 43. Housing growth 27,442 new dwellings average 1,829 pa this is higher than 5 year average 1,811 significantly higher than 10 year average of 1,513 “Current evidence suggests a significant decrease in units to be completed due to economic downturn” proposed growth is: below level in Cardiff 2008 LHMA higher than SE Wales Regional Apportionment Exercise
    44. 44. Community safety and creating a safe environment
    45. 45. Community safety and creating a safe environment All new development shall be designed to promote a safe and secure environment and minimise the opportunity for crime:
    46. 46. Community safety and creating a safe environment All new development shall be designed to promote a safe and secure environment and minimise the opportunity for crime: Maximise natural surveillance of areas which may be vulnerable to crime such as publicly accessible spaces, open space, car parking areas and footpaths
    47. 47. Community safety and creating a safe environment All new development shall be designed to promote a safe and secure environment and minimise the opportunity for crime: Maximise natural surveillance of areas which may be vulnerable to crime such as publicly accessible spaces, open space, car parking areas and footpaths Have well defined routes, spaces and entrances that provide convenient movement without compromising security;
    48. 48. Community safety and creating a safe environment All new development shall be designed to promote a safe and secure environment and minimise the opportunity for crime: Maximise natural surveillance of areas which may be vulnerable to crime such as publicly accessible spaces, open space, car parking areas and footpaths Have well defined routes, spaces and entrances that provide convenient movement without compromising security; Maintain perceptible distinction between public and private spaces through well defined boundaries and defensible space;
    49. 49. Community safety and creating a safe environment All new development shall be designed to promote a safe and secure environment and minimise the opportunity for crime: Maximise natural surveillance of areas which may be vulnerable to crime such as publicly accessible spaces, open space, car parking areas and footpaths Have well defined routes, spaces and entrances that provide convenient movement without compromising security; Maintain perceptible distinction between public and private spaces through well defined boundaries and defensible space; Provide a good standard of lighting to public spaces and routes while minimising light pollution
    50. 50. Community safety and creating a safe environment All new development shall be designed to promote a safe and secure environment and minimise the opportunity for crime: Maximise natural surveillance of areas which may be vulnerable to crime such as publicly accessible spaces, open space, car parking areas and footpaths Have well defined routes, spaces and entrances that provide convenient movement without compromising security; Maintain perceptible distinction between public and private spaces through well defined boundaries and defensible space; Provide a good standard of lighting to public spaces and routes while minimising light pollution Be designed with management and maintenance in mind, to discourage crime in the present and future
    51. 51. Keynote by John Punter: Urban design and housing
    52. 52. Keynote by John Punter: Urban design and housing
    53. 53. Discussion: Urban design and housing
    54. 54. Discussion: Urban design and housing
    55. 55. Break 20 mins!
    56. 56. LDP on: Work and economy
    57. 57. LDP on: Work and economy
    58. 58. Policy summary from LDP
    59. 59. Policy summary from LDP Jobs are 88% service sector - 25% business & financial
    60. 60. Policy summary from LDP Jobs are 88% service sector - 25% business & financial Planned city office development for 20k jobs
    61. 61. Policy summary from LDP Jobs are 88% service sector - 25% business & financial Planned city office development for 20k jobs Retain ‘urban village’ feel at city sites
    62. 62. Policy summary from LDP Jobs are 88% service sector - 25% business & financial Planned city office development for 20k jobs Retain ‘urban village’ feel at city sites IBP to attract creative - bioscience - IT - HQ for air links
    63. 63. Policy summary from LDP Jobs are 88% service sector Small, green technology site - 25% business & financial Planned city office development for 20k jobs Retain ‘urban village’ feel at city sites IBP to attract creative - bioscience - IT - HQ for air links
    64. 64. Policy summary from LDP Jobs are 88% service sector Small, green technology site - 25% business & financial Focus on high skill jobs Planned city office development for 20k jobs Retain ‘urban village’ feel at city sites IBP to attract creative - bioscience - IT - HQ for air links
    65. 65. Policy summary from LDP Jobs are 88% service sector Small, green technology site - 25% business & financial Focus on high skill jobs Planned city office 2021 offices will be: development for 20k jobs Retain ‘urban village’ feel at city sites IBP to attract creative - bioscience - IT - HQ for air links
    66. 66. Policy summary from LDP Jobs are 88% service sector Small, green technology site - 25% business & financial Focus on high skill jobs Planned city office 2021 offices will be: development for 20k jobs high rise in city centre Retain ‘urban village’ feel at city sites IBP to attract creative - bioscience - IT - HQ for air links
    67. 67. Policy summary from LDP Jobs are 88% service sector Small, green technology site - 25% business & financial Focus on high skill jobs Planned city office 2021 offices will be: development for 20k jobs high rise in city centre Retain ‘urban village’ feel at city sites urban village mixed economy IBP to attract creative - bioscience - IT - HQ for air links
    68. 68. Policy summary from LDP Jobs are 88% service sector Small, green technology site - 25% business & financial Focus on high skill jobs Planned city office 2021 offices will be: development for 20k jobs high rise in city centre Retain ‘urban village’ feel at city sites urban village mixed economy IBP to attract creative - IBP HQ at junction 32, M4 bioscience - IT - HQ for air links
    69. 69. Delivering sustainable growth
    70. 70. Delivering sustainable growth Support the development of Cardiff as the heart of a sustainable competitive and integrated city region
    71. 71. Delivering sustainable growth Support the development of Cardiff as the heart of a sustainable competitive and integrated city region Maintain and enhance the vitality, attractiveness and viability of the City Centre as a place to work and live as the principal and most accessible commercial, administrative and visitor focus of the city region
    72. 72. Delivering sustainable growth Support the development of Cardiff as the heart of a sustainable competitive and integrated city region Maintain and enhance the vitality, attractiveness and viability of the City Centre as a place to work and live as the principal and most accessible commercial, administrative and visitor focus of the city region Progress the regeneration of Cardiff Bay to provide new and accessible housing, employment and leisure opportunities and visitor attractions
    73. 73. Delivering sustainable growth continued
    74. 74. Delivering sustainable growth continued Ensure a range and choice of employment land and business premises is provided to maintain and improve the economic competitiveness of the city, encourage entrepreneurship, promote growth of indigenous businesses and attract inward investment.
    75. 75. Delivering sustainable growth continued Ensure a range and choice of employment land and business premises is provided to maintain and improve the economic competitiveness of the city, encourage entrepreneurship, promote growth of indigenous businesses and attract inward investment. Assist the promotion of Cardiff as a major tourist destination including the provision of the development of a variety of good quality tourist facilities and visitor accommodation
    76. 76. Delivering sustainable growth continued Ensure a range and choice of employment land and business premises is provided to maintain and improve the economic competitiveness of the city, encourage entrepreneurship, promote growth of indigenous businesses and attract inward investment. Assist the promotion of Cardiff as a major tourist destination including the provision of the development of a variety of good quality tourist facilities and visitor accommodation Support the development of an integrated transport system
    77. 77. Capacity
    78. 78. Capacity there could be 400,00 sq m of office space developed in Bay and south Cardiff - for 20,000 employees
    79. 79. Capacity there could be 400,00 sq m of office space developed in Bay and south Cardiff - for 20,000 employees three hectares at Cardiff Gate for business development
    80. 80. Capacity there could be 400,00 sq m of office space developed in Bay and south Cardiff - for 20,000 employees three hectares at Cardiff Gate for business development General industry and warehousing - Wentloog (28 ha), Pengam (10 ha), Leckwith (8 ha)
    81. 81. Capacity there could be 400,00 sq m of office space developed in Bay and south Cardiff - for 20,000 employees three hectares at Cardiff Gate for business development General industry and warehousing - Wentloog (28 ha), Pengam (10 ha), Leckwith (8 ha) A new business park at junction 33 M4 (131 ha)
    82. 82. Capacity there could be 400,00 sq m of office space developed in Bay and south Cardiff - for 20,000 employees three hectares at Cardiff Gate for business development General industry and warehousing - Wentloog (28 ha), Pengam (10 ha), Leckwith (8 ha) A new business park at junction 33 M4 (131 ha) There is sufficient land to accommodate projected employment growth
    83. 83. Employment growth
    84. 84. Employment growth The LDP would accommodate the 10.7% growth in jobs in Cardiff (23,200 jobs), forecast by Cambridge Econometrics between 2006 and 2021, if current trends continue.
    85. 85. Employment growth The LDP would accommodate the 10.7% growth in jobs in Cardiff (23,200 jobs), forecast by Cambridge Econometrics between 2006 and 2021, if current trends continue. This forecast forms the basis for the current Economic Strategy for Cardiff and would enable the city to maintain its role within the regional and national economies
    86. 86. Retail growth Given the level of recent and current retail development in the city (90,000 sq m at St David's 2), it is not anticipated that there will be a requirement for substantial additional retail floor space over the Plan period.
    87. 87. Thoughts on Work and economy - Ideopolis/Work Foundation
    88. 88. Thoughts on Work and economy - Ideopolis/Work Foundation
    89. 89. Changing Working Patterns Findings from independent research conducted by The Work Foundation, supported by BT
    90. 90. ‘New’ and ‘old’ technologies at work © The Work Foundation. Base: All (1243)
    91. 91. New technologies are providing additional ways to communicate © The Work Foundation.
    92. 92. Employees use different communication tools for different relationships and tasks © The Work Foundation.
    93. 93. Relationships at work matter to job satisfaction – but friendships don’t rely on working in the same place… © The Work Foundation.
    94. 94. Relationships at work matter to job satisfaction – but friendships don’t rely on working in the same place… • When social capital is high, job satisfaction is high too © The Work Foundation.
    95. 95. Relationships at work matter to job satisfaction – but friendships don’t rely on working in the same place… • When social capital is high, job satisfaction is high too © The Work Foundation.
    96. 96. Relationships at work matter to job satisfaction – but friendships don’t rely on working in the same place… • When social capital is high, job satisfaction is high too • Most people do still work in a single company premises with most of their immediate colleagues © The Work Foundation.
    97. 97. Relationships at work matter to job satisfaction – but friendships don’t rely on working in the same place… • When social capital is high, job satisfaction is high too • Most people do still work in a single company premises with most of their immediate colleagues © The Work Foundation.
    98. 98. Relationships at work matter to job satisfaction – but friendships don’t rely on working in the same place… • When social capital is high, job satisfaction is high too • Most people do still work in a single company premises with most of their immediate colleagues • BUT work friendships are not reliant on working in the same physical place as colleagues © The Work Foundation.
    99. 99. Relationships at work matter to job satisfaction – but friendships don’t rely on working in the same place… • When social capital is high, job satisfaction is high too • Most people do still work in a single company premises with most of their immediate colleagues • BUT work friendships are not reliant on working in the same physical place as colleagues © The Work Foundation.
    100. 100. Relationships at work matter to job satisfaction – but friendships don’t rely on working in the same place… • When social capital is high, job satisfaction is high too • Most people do still work in a single company premises with most of their immediate colleagues • BUT work friendships are not reliant on working in the same physical place as colleagues • People do not need to work in the same physical location as their colleagues to feel confident about communicating, to form strong professional relationships or to be satisfied with their work © The Work Foundation.
    101. 101. Working relationships are the most important aspect of organisational culture © The Work Foundation.
    102. 102. Working relationships are the most important aspect of organisational culture © The Work Foundation.
    103. 103. Working relationships are the most important aspect of organisational culture © The Work Foundation.
    104. 104. Working relationships are the most important aspect of organisational culture © The Work Foundation.
    105. 105. Technology and work © The Work Foundation.
    106. 106. Technology and work • Technology is a new communication tool; it is not technology that makes the difference but how it is used © The Work Foundation.
    107. 107. Technology and work • Technology is a new communication tool; it is not technology that makes the difference but how it is used © The Work Foundation.
    108. 108. Technology and work • Technology is a new communication tool; it is not technology that makes the difference but how it is used • Working relationships matter and organisations need to create cultures that support stronger working relationships © The Work Foundation.
    109. 109. Technology and work • Technology is a new communication tool; it is not technology that makes the difference but how it is used • Working relationships matter and organisations need to create cultures that support stronger working relationships © The Work Foundation.
    110. 110. Technology and work • Technology is a new communication tool; it is not technology that makes the difference but how it is used • Working relationships matter and organisations need to create cultures that support stronger working relationships • New technologies create additional ways to interact with people – and more choices about the right technology for the right people and the right task © The Work Foundation.
    111. 111. Technology and work • Technology is a new communication tool; it is not technology that makes the difference but how it is used • Working relationships matter and organisations need to create cultures that support stronger working relationships • New technologies create additional ways to interact with people – and more choices about the right technology for the right people and the right task © The Work Foundation.
    112. 112. Technology and work • Technology is a new communication tool; it is not technology that makes the difference but how it is used • Working relationships matter and organisations need to create cultures that support stronger working relationships • New technologies create additional ways to interact with people – and more choices about the right technology for the right people and the right task • New technologies are associated with confidence and with perceiving the organisational culture as having stronger personal relationships © The Work Foundation.
    113. 113. Technology and work • Technology is a new communication tool; it is not technology that makes the difference but how it is used • Working relationships matter and organisations need to create cultures that support stronger working relationships • New technologies create additional ways to interact with people – and more choices about the right technology for the right people and the right task • New technologies are associated with confidence and with perceiving the organisational culture as having stronger personal relationships © The Work Foundation.
    114. 114. Technology and work • Technology is a new communication tool; it is not technology that makes the difference but how it is used • Working relationships matter and organisations need to create cultures that support stronger working relationships • New technologies create additional ways to interact with people – and more choices about the right technology for the right people and the right task • New technologies are associated with confidence and with perceiving the organisational culture as having stronger personal relationships • Organisations need to think about how they can best use different forms of communication and different types of technology, old and new. © The Work Foundation.
    115. 115. Ongoing importance of place: Geography of Knowledge Economy % Employment in knowledge- intensive services, 2006 Eurostat definition of knowledge intensive services includes: communications, computer services, other business services, financial services and health and education services. © The Work Foundation.
    116. 116. Ongoing importance of place: Geography of Knowledge Economy % Employment in knowledge- intensive services, 2006 Eurostat definition of knowledge intensive services includes: communications, computer services, other business services, financial services and health and education services. © The Work Foundation.
    117. 117. In summary - my notes © The Work Foundation.
    118. 118. In summary - my notes • Work has largely changed from post industrial to knowledge economy - plus the supporting services for it - creche to sports club © The Work Foundation.
    119. 119. In summary - my notes • Work has largely changed from post industrial to knowledge economy - plus the supporting services for it - creche to sports club • Buildings are for people not manufacturing processes © The Work Foundation.
    120. 120. In summary - my notes • Work has largely changed from post industrial to knowledge economy - plus the supporting services for it - creche to sports club • Buildings are for people not manufacturing processes • Most of the technological changes to working have occurred in the past 15 years - some are implemented at home, more than at work eg social networking, video conferencing and ip voice, mass transfer of high volume media eg films, music, photos © The Work Foundation.
    121. 121. In summary - my notes • Work has largely changed from post industrial to knowledge economy - plus the supporting services for it - creche to sports club • Buildings are for people not manufacturing processes • Most of the technological changes to working have occurred in the past 15 years - some are implemented at home, more than at work eg social networking, video conferencing and ip voice, mass transfer of high volume media eg films, music, photos • Technologies for adding value are - and will increasingly be - provided ‘out of the office’, not by employers: eg Google and iPhone aps; cloud computing services; books on demand © The Work Foundation.
    122. 122. In summary - my notes • Work has largely changed from post industrial to knowledge economy - plus the supporting services for it - creche to sports club • Buildings are for people not manufacturing processes • Most of the technological changes to working have occurred in the past 15 years - some are implemented at home, more than at work eg social networking, video conferencing and ip voice, mass transfer of high volume media eg films, music, photos • Technologies for adding value are - and will increasingly be - provided ‘out of the office’, not by employers: eg Google and iPhone aps; cloud computing services; books on demand • Home computers can mostly do everything an employer needs doing - often better © The Work Foundation.
    123. 123. In summary - my notes • Work has largely changed from post industrial to knowledge economy - plus the supporting services for it - creche to sports club • Buildings are for people not manufacturing processes • Most of the technological changes to working have occurred in the past 15 years - some are implemented at home, more than at work eg social networking, video conferencing and ip voice, mass transfer of high volume media eg films, music, photos • Technologies for adding value are - and will increasingly be - provided ‘out of the office’, not by employers: eg Google and iPhone aps; cloud computing services; books on demand • Home computers can mostly do everything an employer needs doing - often better • Face to face is important, will probably become more so, but for less of the time: again third-parties can provide such facilities (airports, hotels, universities, business centres) © The Work Foundation.
    124. 124. In summary - my notes • Work has largely changed from post industrial to knowledge economy - plus the supporting services for it - creche to sports club • Buildings are for people not manufacturing processes • Most of the technological changes to working have occurred in the past 15 years - some are implemented at home, more than at work eg social networking, video conferencing and ip voice, mass transfer of high volume media eg films, music, photos • Technologies for adding value are - and will increasingly be - provided ‘out of the office’, not by employers: eg Google and iPhone aps; cloud computing services; books on demand • Home computers can mostly do everything an employer needs doing - often better • Face to face is important, will probably become more so, but for less of the time: again third-parties can provide such facilities (airports, hotels, universities, business centres) • New businesses can migrate from a bedroom to boardroom without needing an office block © The Work Foundation.
    125. 125. Discussion: Work & Economy
    126. 126. Discussion: Work & Economy
    127. 127. 5 minute sum up
    128. 128. Next steps ... Cardiff Civic Society will document the key points from these sessions make inputs on the topics to Cardiff Council for 9th June You make sure CCS has your contact details, email address etc can join CCS make individual input to the LDP consultation (but be aware of the strict method and timetable)
    129. 129. Discussing the local development plan A plan for Cardiff?
    130. 130. Part 2: Wednesday, Cardiff same time and Civic place. Transport, Society Environment. Discussing the local development plan See you here! A plan for Cardiff?
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