© 2014 IBM Corporation
Introduction to IBM Messaging
Capabilities
AMC-1866
Please Note
IBM’s statements regarding its plans, directions, and intent are subject to change
or withdrawal without notic...
Anywhere
Anyone
Anyway
Anyhow
Anything
Creating scalable, resilient and interactive applications
RubyRuby
Node.jsNode.js
P...
Why IBM Messaging for Modern Enterprise SOA Applications
Pending
work
Application
State
data
Business
logic
User
interface...
Transactions and Events
Pending
work
Application
State
data
Business
logic
User
interfaces
Serviceinterface
Events
Queries...
Batch and Files
Pending
work
Application
State
data
Business
logic
User
interfaces
Serviceinterface
Events
Requests
for wo...
Request / Reply Queries
Pending
work
Application
State
data
Business
logic
User
interfaces
Serviceinterface
Events
Request...
Within the application logic
Pending
work
Application
State
data
Business
logic
User
interfaces
Serviceinterface
Events
Re...
IBM MQ
A single, robust universal messaging backbone for dynamic,
diverse systems
Heterogeneous any-to-any connectivity fr...
Business
Partners
MQ as a Universal Messaging Backbone
Active/Active
Queue Manager Hubs
Multi-instance
Queue Managers,
and...
MQ Cluster
Workload Balancing
MQ Cluster
Workload Balancing
Scalable Pattern: Active/Active HA and no SPOF
Every sender/re...
Scalable pattern: Sending messages
Each app instance sends to two different queue managers
Need a workload management stra...
Scalable pattern: Receiving messages
Each application instance needs two active listeners
• Random/prioritised attachment ...
Scalable pattern: Synchronous request/response
Response 1
Requester
application
Connection
logic
(CCDT or
custom)
MQ 1
MQ ...
Asynchronous
Receiver
Scalable pattern: Two-way asynchronous messaging
The optimal use of messaging is fully asynchronous
...
Scalable pattern: Publish/subscribe messaging
MQ gives the same QoS for pub/sub as for P2P
• Fan out messages one-to-many
...
Internet of Things – 2020 forecast
212 Billion
Installed Things
30 Billion
Autonomously connected Things
Highly sophistica...
Why Messaging for Mobile and M2M
The HTTP standard revolutionized how people consume data
• Simple request/response model
...
Use case – Connected car
Connected car
vibration detected,
details published
Unlock
my car
schedules appointment
with car ...
MQTT protocol for mobile and M2M messaging
MQTT is a messaging protocol ideally suited to mobile and M2M environments
It h...
IBM MessageSight
24
• A purpose-built messaging appliance
• The gateway to the Internet of Things for the enterprise
• Fas...
IBM MessageSight at the boundary of the Enterprise
25
Managed
APIs
Managed
APIs
Registration
and messaging
Registration
and messaging
Partners
Customers
Developers
Employees
Mo...
A new breed of Developer has evolved
Expects communications to be easy
• Thinks in REST/HTTP, JSON and simple XML
Develops...
29
MessagingMessaging
A Typical Developer Use-Case for Messaging
I want to offload expensive tasks to workers
• So I can k...
30
MQ Light and Application Messaging
Messaging for application developers to help
create responsive applications that sca...
Application messaging deployment options
Developer coding in Python,
Ruby, JavaScript, Java, C#,
PHP
Elastic MQ
(On BlueMi...
Try IBM application messaging today!
MQ Light: www.ibmdw.net/messaging/mq-light/
Elastic MQ : www.bluemix.net
MQ
LightJMS
Messaging for Enterprise, Mobile and Cloud Sessions this Week
Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday
09:00 1868: IBM WS MQ: Dis...
Messaging for Enterprise, Mobile and Cloud
• 1880: Secure Messages with IBM WebSphere MQ Advanced Message Security
• 1866:...
Questions?
We Value Your Feedback
Don’t forget to submit your Impact session and speaker
feedback! Your feedback is very important to...
Thank You
Legal Disclaimer
• © IBM Corporation 2014. All Rights Reserved.
• The information contained in this publication is provide...
IBM IMPACT 2014 AMC-1866 Introduction to IBM Messaging Capabilities
IBM IMPACT 2014 AMC-1866 Introduction to IBM Messaging Capabilities
IBM IMPACT 2014 AMC-1866 Introduction to IBM Messaging Capabilities
IBM IMPACT 2014 AMC-1866 Introduction to IBM Messaging Capabilities
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IBM IMPACT 2014 AMC-1866 Introduction to IBM Messaging Capabilities

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IBM Messaging provides market-leading capabilities for anywhere-to-anywhere integration across mobile, cloud, and enterprise platforms - from the simplest pair of applications requiring basic connectivity and data exchange, to the most complex business process management environments. Come to this session to understand the value and rationale of message/queuing and the IBM Messaging family of products; its key features and functions; and how it can be used to build a secure, flexible, and scalable messaging backbone for a business.

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IBM IMPACT 2014 AMC-1866 Introduction to IBM Messaging Capabilities

  1. 1. © 2014 IBM Corporation Introduction to IBM Messaging Capabilities AMC-1866
  2. 2. Please Note IBM’s statements regarding its plans, directions, and intent are subject to change or withdrawal without notice at IBM’s sole discretion. Information regarding potential future products is intended to outline our general product direction and it should not be relied on in making a purchasing decision. The information mentioned regarding potential future products is not a commitment, promise, or legal obligation to deliver any material, code or functionality. Information about potential future products may not be incorporated into any contract. The development, release, and timing of any future features or functionality described for our products remains at our sole discretion. Performance is based on measurements and projections using standard IBM benchmarks in a controlled environment. The actual throughput or performance that any user will experience will vary depending upon many factors, including considerations such as the amount of multiprogramming in the user’s job stream, the I/O configuration, the storage configuration, and the workload processed. Therefore, no assurance can be given that an individual user will achieve results similar to those stated here.
  3. 3. Anywhere Anyone Anyway Anyhow Anything Creating scalable, resilient and interactive applications RubyRuby Node.jsNode.js PythonPython CC C++C++ JavaJava C#C# PerlPerl GoGo ClojureClojure LuaLua ErlangErlang ScalaScala PHPPHP XML SOAP JSON COPYBOOK Zip Image Telemetry CSV IaaS XML PaaS bare metal virtual machine
  4. 4. Why IBM Messaging for Modern Enterprise SOA Applications Pending work Application State data Business logic User interfaces Serviceinterface Events Transactions Requests for work Queries Batch/files
  5. 5. Transactions and Events Pending work Application State data Business logic User interfaces Serviceinterface Events Queries Transactions Batch/files - Transaction integrity via exactly once delivery - Massive scale event distribution - Supports all endpoints, from Mainframe to Mobile - Transaction integrity via exactly once delivery - Massive scale event distribution - Supports all endpoints, from Mainframe to Mobile Requests for work
  6. 6. Batch and Files Pending work Application State data Business logic User interfaces Serviceinterface Events Requests for work Queries Transactions Batch/files - Secure and auditable Managed File Transfer (MFT) - Efficient batch processing for any application platform - Evolve systems from batch to real-time processing - Secure and auditable Managed File Transfer (MFT) - Efficient batch processing for any application platform - Evolve systems from batch to real-time processing
  7. 7. Request / Reply Queries Pending work Application State data Business logic User interfaces Serviceinterface Events Requests for work Queries - Prioritize, control and smooth high scale workloads - Protect critical systems from new REST / HTTP front-end workloads - Hide the complexity of global infrastructure from apps and developers - Prioritize, control and smooth high scale workloads - Protect critical systems from new REST / HTTP front-end workloads - Hide the complexity of global infrastructure from apps and developers Transactions Batch/files
  8. 8. Within the application logic Pending work Application State data Business logic User interfaces Serviceinterface Events Requests for work Queries - Optimize processing within the application - Offload time-intensive processing - Parallelize complex tasks - Exploit WebSockets to make UIs responsive - Optimize processing within the application - Offload time-intensive processing - Parallelize complex tasks - Exploit WebSockets to make UIs responsive Transactions Batch/files
  9. 9. IBM MQ A single, robust universal messaging backbone for dynamic, diverse systems Heterogeneous any-to-any connectivity from desktop to mainframe A scalable messaging architecture that enables capacity to be incrementally grown to meet increasing workloads Assures one-time delivery – messages are never lost or duplicated Loosely coupled application architecture enables you to respond rapidly to internal and external challenges easily by modifying existing services 11 WebSphere MQ Advanced for Developers - Full WebSphere MQ Advanced package - Package available for download by developers - Supported offering available priced per Single User Install
  10. 10. Business Partners MQ as a Universal Messaging Backbone Active/Active Queue Manager Hubs Multi-instance Queue Managers, and HA clustering Co-located Queue Managers z/OS Queue Sharing Groups Secure MQ Cluster and Channel communications – manage complexity and route around failures
  11. 11. MQ Cluster Workload Balancing MQ Cluster Workload Balancing Scalable Pattern: Active/Active HA and no SPOF Every sender/requester uses two connections Every receiver/service has two listeners Make each Queue Manager HA to recover persistent messages Simple to interoperate with co-located Queue Managers Simple to interoperate with z/OS Queue Sharing Groups Pattern discussed in detail here: http://ow.ly/vrUUV App1 QM1App1 QM1 App1 QM2 App1 QM2 App2 QM1App2 QM1 Shared QM1Shared QM1 Shared QM2Shared QM2 App1 Inst1App1 Inst1 App1 Inst2App1 Inst2 App1 Inst3App1 Inst3 App1 Inst4App1 Inst4 App2 Inst1App2 Inst1 App2 Inst2App2 Inst2 App2 Inst3App2 Inst3 App2 Inst4App2 Inst4 App2 QM2App2 QM2 App2 QM3App2 QM3 App2 QM4App2 QM4 App1 Inst1App1 Inst1 App1 Inst2App1 Inst2 App1 Inst3App1 Inst3 App1 Inst4App1 Inst4 App2 Inst1App2 Inst1 App2 Inst2App2 Inst2
  12. 12. Scalable pattern: Sending messages Each app instance sends to two different queue managers Need a workload management strategy • Prioritised • Random • Round robin – my personal preference Biggest practical concern for customers: How does my app code connect to two remote queue managers? http://ow.ly/vrWEP Sending application Connection logic (CCDT or custom) QM 1 QM 2 MQ connection 1 MQ connection 2 MQCluster
  13. 13. Scalable pattern: Receiving messages Each application instance needs two active listeners • Random/prioritised attachment can lead to stranded messages For Java EE this means two MDB endpoints • EJB 2.1 style deployment descriptors – Add a second endpoint to the XML • EJB 3.0 style annotations – Create a code hierarchy Receiving application Active Active MQ Listener 1 MQ Listener 2 MQCluster QM 1 QM 2 Note: AMQSCLM provides an alternative if you cannot create two active listeners. AMQSCLM redirects messages via the cluster if one consumer is down: http://ow.ly/vrY9y
  14. 14. Scalable pattern: Synchronous request/response Response 1 Requester application Connection logic (CCDT or custom) MQ 1 MQ 2 MQ connection 1 MQ connection 2 MQCluster Request 1 Response 2 Request 2 Use same MQ connection to receive the response • e.g. the same JMS Session MQ fills in the MQMD.ReplyToQMgr on send • Back-end app must honour this when sending the response
  15. 15. Asynchronous Receiver Scalable pattern: Two-way asynchronous messaging The optimal use of messaging is fully asynchronous Requests are sent “fire & forget”, as are responses • Critical requests are sent as persistent within a transaction that updates a DB • Transactional state update + persistent send = exactly once delivery Responses are handled by any app instance at any time • No thread is left ‘hung’ in the requesting application • If responses need to be correlated with requests, then a state store is used – A Database – DB2 etc. – An elastic cache – WebSphere eXtreme Scale Must be designed into the application • Can revolutionize responsiveness • Truly decouples applications Receiving application Active Active MQ Listener 1 MQ Listener 2 MQCluster Receiving Gateway 1 Receiving Gateway 2 Fire & Forget Requester CCDT or custom Sending Gateway 1 Sending Gateway 2 MQ connection 1 MQ connection 2 MQ Listener 1 MQ Listener 2 50% requests 50% requests 50% responses 50% responses
  16. 16. Scalable pattern: Publish/subscribe messaging MQ gives the same QoS for pub/sub as for P2P • Fan out messages one-to-many • WLM across multiple subscriber instances Achieved by bridging durable subscriptions to cluster queues • Define subscriptions on queue managers where publishers connect Sub1 Inst1 Sub1 Inst2Pub Inst1 Pub Inst2 QM1 QM2 QM3 QM4 Pub/SubFan-Out +MQClusterWLM Sub2 Inst1 Sub2 Inst2 QM3 QM4
  17. 17. Internet of Things – 2020 forecast 212 Billion Installed Things 30 Billion Autonomously connected Things Highly sophisticated Mobile Things with human interaction Instrumented & Interconnected Things communicating M2M (machine-to-machine) Source: IDC, December 2013
  18. 18. Why Messaging for Mobile and M2M The HTTP standard revolutionized how people consume data • Simple request/response model • Available via any tablet, laptop, phone, PC etc. • Not designed for wireless • Slow and unreliable on mobile networks Mobile and M2M have additional challenges • Requires a real-time, event-driven model • Publishing information one-to-many • Listening for events as they happen • Sending small packets of data in huge volumes • Reliably pushing data over unreliable networks
  19. 19. Use case – Connected car Connected car vibration detected, details published Unlock my car schedules appointment with car owner Find my car predicts part failure
  20. 20. MQTT protocol for mobile and M2M messaging MQTT is a messaging protocol ideally suited to mobile and M2M environments It has an open specification (http://mqtt.org) • There are over 40 different client implementations • Standardization with OASIS is in progress High-quality, open-source implementations of clients • Hosted at the Eclipse Paho project • Build the clients yourself or use free ones from IBM or others MQTT is very lean and fast • Efficient format with minimal overhead • Client implementations are small and can run on small devices Communication using messaging is much more flexible than request/response • Bi-directional, asynchronous “push” communication • Publish/subscribe decouples the senders of information from the receivers
  21. 21. IBM MessageSight 24 • A purpose-built messaging appliance • The gateway to the Internet of Things for the enterprise • Fast, lightweight, secure, reliable messaging for Mobile
  22. 22. IBM MessageSight at the boundary of the Enterprise 25
  23. 23. Managed APIs Managed APIs Registration and messaging Registration and messaging Partners Customers Developers Employees More Things Built-in IoT Capabilities Built-in IoT Capabilities BlueMix dev environment BlueMix dev environment IBM Internet of Things Cloud Statement of direction: http://ow.ly/vGcg7 Quick start: http://quickstart.internetofthings.ibmcloud.com
  24. 24. A new breed of Developer has evolved Expects communications to be easy • Thinks in REST/HTTP, JSON and simple XML Develops web facing apps, using web technologies • Both on the web, and of the web Only cares about infrastructure that rapidly delivers value • Might prototype multiple components to find something that fits Assembles apps using a microservices approach • Well defined components separated by lightweight comms Expects everything to scale • Cares about high levels of redundancy, more than transactions Sees the cloud as the future • For everything from prototyping to production RubyRuby Node.jsNode.js PythonPython CC C++C++ JavaJava C#C# PerlPerl GoGo ClojureClojure LuaLua ErlangErlang ScalaScala PHPPHP
  25. 25. 29 MessagingMessaging A Typical Developer Use-Case for Messaging I want to offload expensive tasks to workers • So I can keep my web requests responsive I care about the Web App and the Workers • I don’t care about the details of the messaging Web App Instance Web App Instance Web App Instance Web App Instance Web App Instance Web App Instance Web App Instance Web App Instance Web App Instance Web App Instance WorkerWorker WorkerWorker WorkerWorker
  26. 26. 30 MQ Light and Application Messaging Messaging for application developers to help create responsive applications that scale easily Trivially easy to get started; • No setup • No configuration • No administration Available as software download or cloud service APIs crafted specifically for each language Tooling that supports app development Software Cloud Service 30
  27. 27. Application messaging deployment options Developer coding in Python, Ruby, JavaScript, Java, C#, PHP Elastic MQ (On BlueMix) WebSphere MQ [Statement of Direction] “MQ Light” Deploy seamlessly to “MQ Light”, MQ or Elastic MQ Builds application and uses MQ Light messaging and tests in local developer sandbox 31
  28. 28. Try IBM application messaging today! MQ Light: www.ibmdw.net/messaging/mq-light/ Elastic MQ : www.bluemix.net MQ LightJMS
  29. 29. Messaging for Enterprise, Mobile and Cloud Sessions this Week Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday 09:00 1868: IBM WS MQ: Disaster Recovery 1870: IBM WS MQ: Using Pub Sub in an MQ Network 1924: Roundtable: IBM WS MQ Light in a IBM WS MQ Infrastructure 10:30 1880: Secure Messages with IBM WS MQ Advanced Message Security 1866: Introduction to IBM Messaging Capabilities 2640: MQ Telemetry Transport (MQTT) Details 3134: Meet the Experts: IBM MessageSight 1924: Roundtable: IBM WS MQ Light in a IBM WS MQ Infrastructure 1896: How to Develop Responsive Applications with IBM WS MQ Light 1885: IBM WS MQ on z/OS & Distributed Platforms - Are They Like Oil & Water 1917: Hands-on Lab: Developing a First Application with IBM WS MQ Light 1294: Enable Active-Active Business Through Enterprise High-availability Messaging Technology 1873: IBM WS MQ Security: Latest Features Deep Dive 12:00 LUNCH LUNCH LUNCH LUNCH 3420: Managing What Needs to Be Managed - It Shouldn’t Matter Where It Is 13:00 1227: How Not to Run a Certificate Management Center of Excellence 1869: IBM WS MQ: Using the Publish Subscribe Messaging Paradigm 1863: What's New in IBM Messaging 1872: IBM WS MQ: Managing Workloads, Scaling & Availability with MQ Clusters 1879: Using IBM WS MQ in Managed File Transfer Environments 1922: Roundtable: IBM Messaging Feedback 1883: Where Is the Message - Analyze IBM WS MQ Recovery Logs, Trace Routes, & Look In Applications 14:15 1800: IBM WS MQ for z/OS & CICS: Workload Balancing in a Plexed World 1863: What's New in IBM Messaging 1924: Roundtable: IBM WS MQ Light in a IBM WS MQ Infrastructure 1876: IBM WS MQ for z/OS: Latest Features Deep Dive 1229: The IBM WS MQ Toolbox: 20 Scripts, One- liners, & Utilities for UNIX & Windows 1804: Mean Time to Innocence: IBM WS MQ Problem Determination 16:00 1877: IBM WS MQ for z/OS: Performance & Accounting 1894: What Is IBM WS MQ Light & Why It Matters 15:45 1882: Building a Scalable & Continuously Avail- able IBM WS MQ Infrastructure with Travelport 1720: Building a Managed File Transfer Service at ADP 1897: Messaging in the Cloud with IBM WS MQ Light & IBM BlueMix 1916:Hands-onLab:IBMWSMQ 3133: Meet the Experts: IBM Messaging 1874: IBM WS MQ: Performance & Internals Deep Dive (Not zOS) 1866: Introduction to IBM Messaging Capabilities 2454: Using IBMs Managed File Transfer Portfolio to Maximize Data Effectiveness 17:15 1881: Using IBM WS MQ with IBM WAS & Liberty Profile 1873: IBM WS MQ Security: Latest Features Deep Dive 17:00 1878: IBM WS MQ for zOS: Shared Queues 1922: Roundtable: IBM Messaging Feedback 1867: IBM WS MQ: High Availability 1922: Roundtable: IBM Messaging Feedback 2646: Discover the Value IBM Software Delivers On Top of Open Source
  30. 30. Messaging for Enterprise, Mobile and Cloud • 1880: Secure Messages with IBM WebSphere MQ Advanced Message Security • 1866: Introduction to IBM Messaging Capabilities • 2640: MQ Telemetry Transport (MQTT) Details • 1227: How Not to Run a Certificate Management Center of Excellence • 1869: IBM WebSphere MQ: Using the Publish Subscribe Messaging Paradigm • 1863: What's New in IBM Messaging • 1877: IBM WebSphere MQ for z/OS: Performance & Accounting • 1894: What Is IBM WebSphere MQ Light & Why It Matters • 1881: Using IBM WebSphere MQ with IBM WebSphere Application Server & Liberty Profile • 1873: IBM WebSphere MQ Security: Latest Features Deep Dive • 3134: Meet the Experts: IBM MessageSight • 1924: Roundtable: IBM WebSphere MQ Light in a IBM WebSphere MQ Infrastructure • 1896: How to Develop Responsive Applications with IBM WebSphere MQ Light • 3420: Managing What Needs to Be Managed - It Shouldnt Matter Where It Is • 1872: IBM WebSphere MQ: Managing Workloads, Scaling & Availability with MQ Clusters • 1800: IBM WebSphere MQ for z/OS & CICS: Workload Balancing in a Plexed World • 1882: Building a Scalable & Continuously Available IBM WebSphere MQ Infrastructure with Travelport • 1720: Building a Managed File Transfer Service at ADP • 1897: Messaging in the Cloud with IBM WebSphere MQ Light & IBM BlueMix • 1878: IBM WebSphere MQ for zOS: Shared Queues • 1922: Roundtable: IBM Messaging Feedback • 1885: IBM WebSphere MQ on z/OS & Distributed Platforms - Are They Like Oil & Water • 1917: Hands-on Lab: Developing a First Application with IBM WebSphere MQ Light • 1879: Using IBM WebSphere MQ in Managed File Transfer Environments • 1876: IBM WebSphere MQ for z/OS: Latest Features Deep Dive • 3133: Meet the Experts: IBM Messaging • 1874: IBM WebSphere MQ: Performance & Internals Deep Dive (Not zOS) • 1916: Hands-on Lab: IBM WebSphere MQ • 1867: IBM WebSphere MQ: High Availability • 2646: Discover the Value IBM Software Delivers On Top of Open Source • 1868: IBM WebSphere MQ: Disaster Recovery • 1870: IBM WebSphere MQ: Using Publish Subscribe in an MQ Network • 1294: Enable Active-Active Business Through Enterprise High-availability Messaging Technology • 1883: Where Is the Message - Analyze IBM WebSphere MQ Recovery Logs, Trace Routes, & Look In Applications • 1229: The IBM WebSphere MQ Toolbox: 20 Scripts, One-liners, & Utilities for UNIX & Windows • 1804: Mean Time to Innocence: IBM WebSphere MQ Problem Determination • 2454: Using IBMs Managed File Transfer Portfolio to Maximize Data Effectiveness Mon 10:30 Mon 10:30, Wed 15:45 Mon 10:30 Mon 13:00 Mon 13:00 Mon 13:00, Tue 14:15 Mon 16:00 Mon 16:00 Mon 17:15 Mon 17:15, Thu 10:30 Tue 10:30 Tue 10:30, Wed 14:15, Thu 09:00 Tue 10:30 Tue 12:00 Tue 13:00 Tue 14:15 Tue 15:45 Tue 15:45 Tue 15:45 Tue 17:00 Tue 17:00, Wed 13:00, Wed 17:00 Wed 10:30 Wed 10:30 Wed 13:00 Wed 14:15 Wed 15:45 Wed 15:45 Wed 15:45 Wed 17:00 Wed 17:00 Thu 09:00 Thu 09:00 Thu 10:30 Thu 13:00 Thu 14:15 Thu 14:15 Thu 15:45
  31. 31. Questions?
  32. 32. We Value Your Feedback Don’t forget to submit your Impact session and speaker feedback! Your feedback is very important to us – we use it to continually improve the conference. Use the Conference Mobile App or the online Agenda Builder to quickly submit your survey • Navigate to “Surveys” to see a view of surveys for sessions you’ve attended 36
  33. 33. Thank You
  34. 34. Legal Disclaimer • © IBM Corporation 2014. All Rights Reserved. • The information contained in this publication is provided for informational purposes only. While efforts were made to verify the completeness and accuracy of the information contained in this publication, it is provided AS IS without warranty of any kind, express or implied. In addition, this information is based on IBM’s current product plans and strategy, which are subject to change by IBM without notice. IBM shall not be responsible for any damages arising out of the use of, or otherwise related to, this publication or any other materials. Nothing contained in this publication is intended to, nor shall have the effect of, creating any warranties or representations from IBM or its suppliers or licensors, or altering the terms and conditions of the applicable license agreement governing the use of IBM software. • References in this presentation to IBM products, programs, or services do not imply that they will be available in all countries in which IBM operates. Product release dates and/or capabilities referenced in this presentation may change at any time at IBM’s sole discretion based on market opportunities or other factors, and are not intended to be a commitment to future product or feature availability in any way. Nothing contained in these materials is intended to, nor shall have the effect of, stating or implying that any activities undertaken by you will result in any specific sales, revenue growth or other results. • If the text contains performance statistics or references to benchmarks, insert the following language; otherwise delete: Performance is based on measurements and projections using standard IBM benchmarks in a controlled environment. The actual throughput or performance that any user will experience will vary depending upon many factors, including considerations such as the amount of multiprogramming in the user's job stream, the I/O configuration, the storage configuration, and the workload processed. Therefore, no assurance can be given that an individual user will achieve results similar to those stated here. • If the text includes any customer examples, please confirm we have prior written approval from such customer and insert the following language; otherwise delete: All customer examples described are presented as illustrations of how those customers have used IBM products and the results they may have achieved. Actual environmental costs and performance characteristics may vary by customer. • Please review text for proper trademark attribution of IBM products. At first use, each product name must be the full name and include appropriate trademark symbols (e.g., IBM Lotus® Sametime® Unyte™). Subsequent references can drop “IBM” but should include the proper branding (e.g., Lotus Sametime Gateway, or WebSphere Application Server). Please refer to http://www.ibm.com/legal/copytrade.shtml for guidance on which trademarks require the ® or ™ symbol. Do not use abbreviations for IBM product names in your presentation. All product names must be used as adjectives rather than nouns. Please list all of the trademarks that you use in your presentation as follows; delete any not included in your presentation. IBM, the IBM logo, Lotus, Lotus Notes, Notes, Domino, Quickr, Sametime, WebSphere, UC2, PartnerWorld and Lotusphere are trademarks of International Business Machines Corporation in the United States, other countries, or both. Unyte is a trademark of WebDialogs, Inc., in the United States, other countries, or both. • If you reference Adobe® in the text, please mark the first use and include the following; otherwise delete: Adobe, the Adobe logo, PostScript, and the PostScript logo are either registered trademarks or trademarks of Adobe Systems Incorporated in the United States, and/or other countries. • If you reference Java™ in the text, please mark the first use and include the following; otherwise delete: Java and all Java-based trademarks are trademarks of Sun Microsystems, Inc. in the United States, other countries, or both. • If you reference Microsoft® and/or Windows® in the text, please mark the first use and include the following, as applicable; otherwise delete: Microsoft and Windows are trademarks of Microsoft Corporation in the United States, other countries, or both. • If you reference Intel® and/or any of the following Intel products in the text, please mark the first use and include those that you use as follows; otherwise delete: Intel, Intel Centrino, Celeron, Intel Xeon, Intel SpeedStep, Itanium, and Pentium are trademarks or registered trademarks of Intel Corporation or its subsidiaries in the United States and other countries. • If you reference UNIX® in the text, please mark the first use and include the following; otherwise delete: UNIX is a registered trademark of The Open Group in the United States and other countries. • If you reference Linux® in your presentation, please mark the first use and include the following; otherwise delete: Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds in the United States, other countries, or both. Other company, product, or service names may be trademarks or service marks of others. • If the text/graphics include screenshots, no actual IBM employee names may be used (even your own), if your screenshots include fictitious company names (e.g., Renovations, Zeta Bank, Acme) please update and insert the following; otherwise delete: All references to [insert fictitious company name] refer to a fictitious company and are used for illustration purposes only.
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