CONTENTS                               TABLE OF            SPOTLIGHT            ON APPLICATIONS.            FOR A BETTER  ...
CONTENTSTABLE OF           INTRODUCTION           PerkinElmer Spotlight on Applications e-Zine – Volume 12           Perki...
CONTENTS                                                                                                              TABL...
CONTENTSTABLE OF                                                                                    a p p l i c at i o n n...
CONTENTS                                                                                                               TAB...
CONTENTSTABLE OF                                                                                                  a p p l ...
CONTENTS                                                                                                                  ...
CONTENTSTABLE OF                                                                                            a p p l i c at...
CONTENTS                                                                                                                  ...
CONTENTSTABLE OF                                                                                 a p p l i c at i o n n o ...
CONTENTS                                                                                                            TABLE ...
CONTENTSTABLE OF                                                                                 a p p l i c at i o n n o ...
CONTENTS                                                                                                         TABLE OF ...
CONTENTSTABLE OF                                                                                   a p p l i c at i o n n ...
CONTENTS                                                                                                                  ...
CONTENTSTABLE OF                                                                               a p p l i c at i o n n o t ...
CONTENTS                                                                                                                  ...
CONTENTSTABLE OF           USEFUL LINKS           View previous issues of our Spotlight on Applications e-Zine           •...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Spotlight on Analytical Applicatons e-Zine - Volume 12

250
-1

Published on

This document provides key analytical applications to help laboratories address the pressing concerns of the changing global landscape. Specifically, Volume 12 includes applications for Energy & Industrial, Environmental, Food & Beverage, Consumer Products and Pharmaceuticals & Nutraceuticals.

Published in: Technology
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
250
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
3
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Spotlight on Analytical Applicatons e-Zine - Volume 12

  1. 1. CONTENTS TABLE OF SPOTLIGHT ON APPLICATIONS. FOR A BETTER TOMORROW.VOLUME 12
  2. 2. CONTENTSTABLE OF INTRODUCTION PerkinElmer Spotlight on Applications e-Zine – Volume 12 PerkinElmer knows that the right training, methods and application support are as integral to getting answers as the instrumentation. That’s why PerkinElmer has developed a novel approach to meet the challenges that today’s labs face, delivering you complete solutions for your application challenges. We are pleased to share with you our Spotlight on Applications e-zine, which delivers a variety of topics that address the pressing issues and analytical challenges you may face in your application areas today. Our Spotlight on Applications e-zine consists of a broad range of applications you’ll be able to access at your convenience. Each application in the table of contents includes an embedded link which takes you directly to the appropriate page within the e-zine. We invite you to explore, enjoy and learn! Be sure to receive future issues by subscribing here. PerkinElmer
  3. 3. CONTENTS TABLE OFCONTENTSConsumer Products• nalysis of Broad Spectrum UVA and UVB Components in Sun Care Products for Compliance A with New FDA Regulations• Thermal Analysis of Lipsticks using Differential Scanning CalorimetryEnergy Industrial• etermination of Impurities in Organic Solvents used in the Semiconductor Industry with D the NexION ICP-MS• etermination of Impurities in Semiconductor-Grade Sulfuric Acid with the NexION ICP-MS D• etermination of Impurities in Electronic-Grade Hydrochloric Acid with the NexION ICP-MS D• etermination of Impurities in Silica Wafers with the NexION ICP-MS DEnvironmental• nalysis of Drinking Waters by U.S. EPA Method 200.8 Using the NexION 300Q ICP-MS A in Standard Mode• nalysis of Drinking Waters by U.S. EPA Method 200.8 Using the NexION 300X ICP-MS A in Standard and Collision Modes• nalysis of Drinking Waters by U.S. EPA Method 200.8 Using the NexION 300D ICP-MS A in Standard, Collision and Reaction Modes• ethod 8260C by Purge and Trap Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry using the Clarus SQ 8 MFood Beverage• Characterizing the Hydrothermal Behavior of Starch with Dynamic Mechanical Analysis • Characterization of Fats in Cookies Using Power Compensation DSC Pharmaceuticals Nutraceuticals• igh Resolution Characterization of Pharmaceutical Polymorphs Using Power Compensation DSC H• StepScan DSC for Obscured Transitions PerkinElmer
  4. 4. CONTENTSTABLE OF a p p l i c at i o n n o t e Liquid Chromatography Author Nonie Danna PerkinElmer, Inc. Waltham, MA USA Analysis of ‘Broad Spectrum’ Introduction The FDA has made changes to how UVA and UVB Components products containing sunscreen are labeled in the U.S. to ensure they meet the in Sun Care Products for new regulations set forth for safety and effectiveness. The new regulations will Compliance with New require companies that want to use the ‘Broad Spectrum’ label to test for both FDA Regulations UVA and UVB protection. The FDA’s standardized test for broad spectrum enables consumers to determine the level of UVA protection a sunscreen provides in addition to its ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation protection. Previous rules only dealt with preventing sunburn which is primarily due to UVB radiation but did not address UVA which protects against early aging and skin cancer. These new testing and labeling requirements are necessary to educate consumers and provide information for consumers to make knowledgeable choices. All products that claim to provide Broad Spectrum SPF protection are regulated as sunscreen products. Therefore, the regulations the FDA has developed for Over The Counter (OTC) sunscreen products apply to cosmetics, moisturizers, lip balms, and shampoos labeled with SPF values. Download Entire Application Note
  5. 5. CONTENTS TABLE OF a p p l i c at i o n n o t e Differential Scanning Calorimetry Thermal Analysis Introduction Thermal analysis is very useful when applied to the development of Lipsticks and analysis of cosmetics. Lipsticks are a complex mixture of compounds that are designed to spread easily and yet wear well. Utilizing DSC Often they are studied by Dynamic Mechanical Analysis, where the frequency response can be correlated with the spreading of the material. However, DSC is often used as a QC tool because it is faster to run than DMA. This application note describes DSC evaluation of lipstick qualities based on the melting of the fats and oils which are the main content of lipsticks. Methods Using DSC to analyze lipstick involves a technique called fingerprinting. The peaks are not assigned to specific transitions but the overall shape, size, and temperature of the peaks are used as an indicator DSC 4000 of performance. As lipstick is applied on the body and worn at room temperature, melting normally occurs slightly above room temperature.Download Entire Application Note
  6. 6. CONTENTSTABLE OF a p p l i c at i o n n o t e ICP-Mass Spectrometry Author Kenneth Ong PerkinElmer, Inc. Singapore Determination of Impurities Introduction Two of the most commonly used organic solvents in the in Organic Solvents used semiconductor industry are isopropyl alcohol (IPA) and propylene glycol methyl ether acetate (PGMEA). While in the Semiconductor IPA is used frequently to clean silicon wafers, PGMEA is used as a thinner or stripper of photoresist. Both must be Industry with the NexION analyzed to check for trace metal contamination where the presence of contaminants would have detrimental 300S ICP-MS effects on the reliability of memory devices. SEMI Standard C41-0705 specifies limits for high purity IPA Grade 4 with contamination limits of less than 100 ppt for each element. With its ability to determine analytes rapidly at the ultratrace (ng/L or parts-per-trillion) level in various process chemicals, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) has become an indispensable analytical tool for quality control. However, it is extremely important to address certain potentially problematic areas when analyzing organic solvents directly, including: viscosity and volatility, compatibility of the sample introduction device, deposition of carbon on the interface cones, matrix-derived polyatomic interferences, as well as matrix suppression effects due to carbon content. A cooled spray chamber might help to reduce the vapor pressure with an optimized sample uptake rate for volatile organic solvents. Carbon deposited on the tip of the interface cones can be avoided by adding a small amount of oxygen into the injector gas flow between the spray chamber and the torch. Although cool plasma has been shown to be effective in reducing argon-based interferences, it is even more prone to matrix suppression than hot plasma. Additionally, the low plasma energy may result in preferential formation of other polyatomic interferences, which are not seen under hot plasma conditions. Collision cells using multipoles and nonreactive gases have proven useful in reducing polyatomic interferences. However, kinetic energy discrimination results in the loss of sensitivity, which is an issue when analyzing ng/L levels. Reaction mode is another technique which uses a reactive gas, such as NH3, to selectively react with the polyatomic interference, and a quadrupole mass filter to create dynamic bandpass to prevent undesirable formation of by-product ions, thereby removing the polyatomic interference effectively without suppressing the analytes’ signal. Download Entire Application Note
  7. 7. CONTENTS TABLE OF a p p l i c at i o n n o t e ICP-Mass Spectrometry Author Kenneth Ong PerkinElmer, Inc. Singapore Determination of Impurities in Introduction Semiconductor-Grade The making of a semiconductor device comprises of forming a sacrificial layer on a substrate. Usually, Sulfuric Acid with the a patterned resist layer forms the sacrificial layer so that ion implantation to the substrate can be NexION 300S ICP-MS performed, after which a wet etching solution is used to remove the patterned photoresist layer. Typically, an etching solution comprises of sulfuric acid (H2SO4) and peroxide (H2O2), known as piranha or ozonated sulfuric acid. As with other chemicals used, any metal impurities present would have detrimental effect on the reliability of an IC device and thus need to be of high purity and quality. SEMI Standard C44-0708 specifies the maximum concentration of metal contaminants by element and tier for sulfuric acid. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) is an indispensable analytical tool for quality control because of its superior capability to detect at the ultratrace (ng/L or parts-per- trillion) level. Nevertheless, under the conventional plasma conditions, argon ions combine with matrix components to generate polyatomic interferences. Some of the interferences in sulfuric acid are 32S15N+ on 47Ti+, 32S16O2+ on 64Zn+, ArS+ on 70-74Ge+, 38Ar1H+ on 39K+, 40Ar+ on 40 Ca+, 40Ar16O+ on 56Fe+. The Dynamic Reaction Cell (DRC™), which uses a quadrupole mass filter to create Dynamic Bandpass Tuning (DBT), is a powerful correction technique to remove interferences on analytes of interest. Collision cells, using nonreactive gases, have proven to be another simple method in reducing specific polyatomic interferences. Both of these techniques are available in PerkinElmer’s NexION® 300 ICP-MS through its unique Universal Cell Technology™, which allows the use of all three modes (Standard, Collision and Reaction) within one analytical method.Download Entire Application Note
  8. 8. CONTENTSTABLE OF a p p l i c at i o n n o t e ICP-Mass Spectrometry Author Kenneth Ong PerkinElmer, Inc. Singapore Determination of Impurities in Electronic- Introduction In the production of semiconductor Grade Hydrochloric Acid devices, the wafers are subjected to a so-called “Standard Clean 2” step, with the NexION 300S commonly referred to as an “SC2” step. The SC2 step is thought to desorb atomic ICP-MS and ionic contaminants from the wafers. In particular, the SC2 step is intended to remove metals deposited on the wafer surface. In a typical SC2 step, the wafers are submerged in a solution of H2O:HCl:H2O2. Thus, it is important to analyze for the presence of metal contaminants in electronic-grade hydrochloric acid (HCl). SEMI Standard C27- 0708 specifies the maximum concentration of metal contaminants by element and tier for hydrochloric acid. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry Table 1. Chloride interferences (ICP-MS) has been used for determination of observed during HCl analysis. ultra-trace impurity levels in various process Interference Analyte chemicals. Nevertheless, under conventional 37 Cl1H2 39 K plasma conditions, argon ions combine with 35 Cl O 16 51 V matrix components to generate polyatomic interferences. Examples of chloride-based 35 C16O1H 52 Cr interferences observed during the analysis of 37 Cl O 16 53 Cr HCl are listed in Table 1. 37 Cl16O16O 69 Ga 40 Ar Cl 35 75 As 40 Ar37Cl 77 Se Download Entire Application Note
  9. 9. CONTENTS TABLE OF a p p l i c at i o n n o t e ICP-Mass Spectrometry Author Kenneth Ong PerkinElmer, Inc. Singapore Determination of Introduction The control of impurity levels in silicon-based Impurities in Silica semiconductor devices is critical because even ultratrace amounts of impurities, including Wafers with the alkali and alkali-earth elements and transition metals, can cause defects, such as voltage NexION 300S ICP-MS breakdown or high dark current. For quality control purposes, there are two types of silicon that are routinely analyzed: bulk silicon and the surface of silicon wafers. Bulk silicon analysis can be performed by totally digesting the silicon using a very aggressive acid, such as hydrofluoric acid (HF). Vapor phase decomposition is the most common method used for the surface analysis of silicon wafers and involves collecting impurities on the wafer surface using a very small amount of acid (typically HF) deposited on the surface as a droplet. This results in a typical sample volume of around 200 μL. For bulk silicon analysis, sample volume is not an issue; however, small sample volumes are desirable in order to minimize time-consuming sample preparation. As such, both types of silicon analyses require the ability to handle small sample volumes and high silicon matrices, as well as an HF-resistant sample introduction system. Since a typical analysis may take 2-3 minutes per sample, low-flow nebulizers with sample uptake rates from 20-100 μL/min are routinely used.Download Entire Application Note
  10. 10. CONTENTSTABLE OF a p p l i c at i o n n o t e ICP-Mass Spectrometry Authors Ewa Pruszkowski, Ph.D. Senior ICP-MS Application Scientist Cynthia P. Bosnak Senior Product Specialist PerkinElmer, Inc. Shelton, CT USA The Analysis of Drinking Introduction Method 200.8 is a well-established method Waters by U.S. EPA Method promulgated by the U.S. Environmental 200.8 Using the NexION Protection Agency (EPA) for the analysis of ground waters, surface waters, drinking 300Q ICP-MS in Standard waters, and wastewaters by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Mode The method was first published in 1990 to support the National Primary Drinking Water Regulations (NPDWR), which specified maximum contaminant levels (MCL) for 12 primary elemental contaminants in public water systems as part of the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) of 1986. There have been many iterations of Method 200.8, including the addition of 9 secondary contaminants under the National Secondary Drinking Water Regulations (NSDWR). These 21 elements, along with suggested analytical masses, are shown in Table 1. The version in use today is Revision 5.4 of the Method, which was approved for drinking water in 1994 and became effective in January, 1995.3 In addition, Method 200.8 was also recommended in 1992 for the monitoring of wastewaters under the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit program to control the discharge of pollutants into navigable water systems, as part of the amended Clean Water Act (CWA) of 1977.4 It was approved on a nation-wide basis for this matrix in 2007. Download Entire Application Note
  11. 11. CONTENTS TABLE OF a p p l i c at i o n n o t e ICP-Mass Spectrometry Authors Ewa Pruszkowski, Ph.D. Senior ICP-MS Application Scientist Cynthia P. Bosnak Senior Product Specialist PerkinElmer, Inc. Shelton, CT USA The Analysis of Drinking Introduction Method 200.8 is a well-established method Waters by U.S. EPA Method promulgated by the U.S. Environmental 200.8 Using the NexION 300X Protection Agency (EPA) for the analysis of ground waters, surface waters, drinking ICP-MS in Standard and waters, and wastewaters by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Collision Modes The method was first published in 1990 to support the National Primary Drinking Water Regulations (NPDWR), which specified maximum contaminant levels (MCL) for 12 primary elemental contaminants in public water systems as part of the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) of 1986. There have been many iterations of Method 200.8, including the addition of 9 secondary contaminants under the National Secondary Drinking Water Regulations (NSDWR). These 21 elements, along with suggested analytical masses, are shown in Table 1. The version in use today is Revision 5.4 of the Method, which was approved for drinking water in 1994 and became effective in January, 1995.3 In addition, Method 200.8 was also recommended in 1992 for the monitoring of wastewaters under the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit program to control the discharge of pollutants into navigable water systems, as part of the amended Clean Water Act (CWA) of 1977.4 It was approved on a nation-wide basis for this matrix in 2007.Download Entire Application Note
  12. 12. CONTENTSTABLE OF a p p l i c at i o n n o t e ICP-Mass Spectrometry Authors Ewa Pruszkowski, Ph.D. Senior ICP-MS Application Scientist Cynthia P. Bosnak Senior Product Specialist PerkinElmer, Inc. Shelton, CT USA The Analysis of Drinking Introduction Method 200.8 is a well-established method Waters by U.S. EPA Method promulgated by the U.S. Environmental 200.8 Using the NexION 300D Protection Agency (EPA) for the analysis of ground waters, surface waters, drinking ICP-MS in Standard, Collision waters, and wastewaters by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). and Reaction Modes The method was first published in 1990 to support the National Primary Drinking Water Regulations (NPDWR), which specified maximum contaminant levels (MCL) for 12 primary elemental contaminants in public water systems as part of the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) of 1986. There have been many iterations of Method 200.8, including the addition of 9 secondary contaminants under the National Secondary Drinking Water Regulations (NSDWR). These 21 elements, along with suggested analytical masses, are shown in Table 1. The version in use today is Revision 5.4 of the Method, which was approved for drinking water in 1994 and became effective in January, 1995.3 In addition, Method 200.8 was also recommended in 1992 for the monitoring of wastewaters under the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit program to control the discharge of pollutants into navigable water systems, as part of the amended Clean Water Act (CWA) of 1977.4 It was approved on a nation-wide basis for this matrix in 2007. Download Entire Application Note
  13. 13. CONTENTS TABLE OF a p p l i c at i o n n o t e Gas Chromatography/ Mass Spectrometry Authors Ruben Garnica Dawn May PerkinElmer, Inc. Shelton, CT USA Method 8260C by Introduction U.S. EPA Method 8260C – Volatile Purge and Trap Gas Organic Compounds (VOCs) by Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry Chromatography (GC/MS) is one of the most common environmental applications for GC/MS. Mass Spectrometry This method outlines the analysis of volatile organic compounds in a variety using the Clarus SQ 8 of solid waste matrices including vari- ous air sampling trapping media, ground and surface water, soils, and sediments among others. The method requires not only demonstration of laboratory sample preparation and handling competence but instrument performance as well. The study presented here demonstrates the PerkinElmer® Clarus® SQ 8 GC/MS with purge and trap sample introduction both meets and exceeds the performance criteria set out in method 8260C and describes the analytical results and instrumental methodology. Experimental The PerkinElmer Clarus SQ 8C GC/MS operating in electron ionization mode with an Atomx purge and trap sample introduction system (Teledyne Tekmar, Mason, OH) was used to perform these experiments. The purge and trap conditions are presented in Table 1 and represent standard conditions for the analysis of method of VOCs by EPA Method 8260C.Download Entire Application Note
  14. 14. CONTENTSTABLE OF a p p l i c at i o n n o t e Dynamic Mechanical Analysis Authors Dr. Frederick J. Warren Dr. Paul G. Royall Dr. Peter R. Ellis Dr. Peter J. Butterworth King’s College London London, UK Dr. Ben Perston PerkinElmer, Inc. Shelton, CT USA Characterizing the Introduction Hydrothermal Behavior Starch is one of the primary sources of energy in of Starch with Dynamic the human diet, and is also used in a wide range of industrial processes, including brewing, bioethanol Mechanical Analysis production, paper manufacture and in the production of biodegradable plastics.1 Starch exists in plants in a granular form, the granules being between 1 and 100 μm in diameter, and has a complex semi-crystalline structure. Starch consists of two polymeric components: amylose, which is an essentially linear α (1→4) linked glucose chain, and amylopectin, which is a branched polymer of α (1→4) linked glucose chains interspersed with α (1→6) branch points. The relative proportions of amorphous and crystalline material in the starch granule, and the arrangement of structure in the granule, have a significant bearing on the behavior of the starch and its response to hydrothermal treatments.2 One of the most important modifications of starch structure that occurs during processing of starch, for both food usage and industrial applications, is gelatinization. When heated in excess water, starch goes through a thermal transition, termed gelatinization, at temperatures between 50 and 70 ˚C. Starch gelatinization is an endothermic transition associated with rapid swelling of the granule and melting of crystalline regions. In the absence of water, starch crystallites go through a melting transition at much higher temperatures Download Entire Application Note
  15. 15. CONTENTS TABLE OF a p p l i c at i o n n o t e Thermal Analysis Characterization Introduction Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) is a useful technique for the characterization of Fats in Cookies of food products, including: Using Power • the gelatinization and staling (retrogradation) behavior of starches • polymorphism of fats such as cocoa butters and chocolate Compensation DSC • effects of moisture content or absorbed moisture • aging effects • protein denaturation • determination of fat content or solid fat index (SFI) The processing and handling behavior of food fats has been found to depend upon the solid-to-liquid fat ratio in the food sample. Many rheological or flow properties, and their resultant effect on the texture of the final product, stem from this fat ratio index. The study of the fat content and the nature of the fats of foods is becoming increasingly more important due to health considerations, especially with regards to the level of solid fats, saturated fats and trans fats in food products. There is a variety of fats with different levels of solid fats available in food products. An example of this is the Oreo® Cookie where there is the regular Oreo® and the reduced fat version. There are also Oreo®-like cookies with no solid, hydrogenated fats present.Download Entire Application Note
  16. 16. CONTENTSTABLE OF a p p l i c at i o n n o t e Thermal Analysis High Resolution Introduction Many pharmaceutical materials exhibit polymorphism, which means Characterization that, depending upon the given processing conditions, the crystalline form may exist in two or more states. The crystalline states or forms of Pharmaceutical exhibit different levels of thermodynamic stabilities and an unstable form can melt at a temperature significantly less than the melting Polymorphs Using point of the thermodynamically stable form. Depending upon the conditions used to generate the crystalline form(s), the drug may Power Compensation exhibit one or more unstable, polymorphic crystalline states. In addition, as one state undergoes melting, it may be followed by DSC crystallization and then melting at increasingly higher temperatures, due to the formation of a more stable state. The existence of these polymorphic crystalline states is important for many pharmaceutical materials, as they can have a major effect upon: • The uptake of the active drug into the bloodstream once ingested • The shelf life of the drug. One polymorphic form of a given drug may be more easily dissolvable or ingestible than another form and the time release of the material can sometimes by controlled by the given type and level of a particular polymorphic form. Additionally, one crystalline form may exhibit a longer shelf life than another form. It is also possible that an easily dissolvable crystalline form can convert, over time, to a less dissolvable form thus changing the pharmaceutically active properties of the drug DSC 8500 formulation. Download Entire Application Note
  17. 17. CONTENTS TABLE OF a p p l i c at i o n n o t e Thermal Analysis Author Kevin Menard PerkinElmer Thermal Laboratory College of Materials Science and Engineering University of North Texas Texas, USA StepScan DSC for StepScan DSC is a temperature modulated DSC technique that operates in conjunction Obscured Transitions with the Power Compensation Diamond DSC from PerkinElmer. The approach applies a series of short interval heating and isothermal hold steps to cover the temperature range of interest. With the StepScan™ DSC approach, two signals are obtained: the Thermodynamic Cp signal represents the thermodynamic aspects of the material, while the Iso K signal reflects the kinetic nature of the sample during heating. The following basic equation mathematically describes the StepScan DSC approach: Heat Flow = Cp(dT/dt) + f(T,t) In this equation, Cp is the sample’s heat capacity, dT/dt is the applied heating rate and f(T,t) is the kinetic response. The first Cp term represents the thermo- dynamic aspects of the sample and, while the Power Compensation DSC applies a purely linear heating ramp for the best results rather than a sine wave where the heating rate is continuously varying. When the sample is held under iso- thermal conditions, as does take place with the Power Compensation DSC and the StepScan DSC approach, the heating rate becomes 0 and the sample’s heat flow is purely described by the kinetic term. Because the sample is either linearly heated or held isothermally (true isothermal), the StepScan DSC approach is straightforward and provides the purest approach to TMDSC measurements.Download Entire Application Note
  18. 18. CONTENTSTABLE OF USEFUL LINKS View previous issues of our Spotlight on Applications e-Zine • Volume 1 • Volume 4 • Volume 7 • Volume 10 • Volume 2 • Volume 5 • Volume 8 • Volume 11 • Volume 3 • Volume 6 • Volume 9 • Archives Access our application archives By Industry: • Consumer Products • Energy • Environmental • Food, Beverage Nutraceuticals • Forensics • Lubricants • Pharmaceutical Development Manufacturing • Polymers/Plastics NEW AxION® DSA™ System • Semiconductor Electronics Mass spec results in seconds with Direct Sample Analysis™. Learn more. By Technology: • Atomic Absorption (AA) • Elemental Analysis • Gas Chromatography (GC) • GC Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS) • Hyphenated Technology • ICP Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) • Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP-OES ICP-AES) • Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR IR) • LIMS Data Handling • Liquid Chromatography (HPLC UHPLC) • Mass Spectrometry • Raman Spectroscopy • Thermal Analysis • UV/Vis UV/Vis/NIR PerkinElmer, Inc. 940 Winter Street Waltham, MA 02451 USA P: (800) 762-4000 or (+1) 203-925-4602 www.perkinelmer.com For a complete listing of our global offices, visit www.perkinelmer.com/ContactUs Copyright ©2012, PerkinElmer, Inc. All rights reserved. PerkinElmer® is a registered trademark of PerkinElmer, Inc. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners. 010405 _01

×