Content Marketing
Substances and
solutions: Creating
content that matters
ART+SCIENCE
A GLOBAL COMPUTERSHARE COMPANY
Art meets science
At Pepper, we truly do walk the walk and
talk the talk—meaning our tagline creative
thinking, strategic ...
ART+SCIENCE
CONTENT MARKETING
3
93% of B2B marketers do some form of content marketing, whether they realize it or not
(Ma...
ART+SCIENCE
CONTENT MARKETING
4
High
Medium-High
Medium
Low-Medium
Low
Periodic Table of Content
SaSample
Print and Online...
ART+SCIENCE
CONTENT MARKETING
5
Sample molecules
With B2B marketing, there are plenty of people who can influence purchase...
ART+SCIENCE
CONTENT MARKETING
6
Assembling your strategy
Goal: What is the goal, the end output for your
content marketing...
ART+SCIENCE
CONTENT MARKETING
7
Real reactions
What to look for
Depending on the reaction you want from your audience, cho...
ART+SCIENCE
CONTENT MARKETING
8
Table of content
Articles | Ac		
An article’s potential for creating bonds ranges a great
...
ART+SCIENCE
CONTENT MARKETING
9
Localized content | Loc	 			
To get different audiences to react with different
content el...
ART+SCIENCE
CONTENT MARKETING
pepperglobal.com
2 North LaSalle Street
Chicago, IL 60602
Contact Pepper today to learn how ...
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Content Marketing eBook: Creating content that matters

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Content marketing is more than just creating and sharing content to engage potential customers; it’s individual elements that can be used separately or together to create highly customized materials for individual audiences. Included in this eBook is a periodic table of content types showing you how you can combine elements into a substance that matters to your target audiences.

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Content Marketing eBook: Creating content that matters

  1. 1. Content Marketing Substances and solutions: Creating content that matters ART+SCIENCE A GLOBAL COMPUTERSHARE COMPANY
  2. 2. Art meets science At Pepper, we truly do walk the walk and talk the talk—meaning our tagline creative thinking, strategic results actually is the way we do business. Follow this guide, and you’ll see how to put science behind every creative idea. You’ll also learn how to make intelligent decisions when it comes to marketing’s most buzzworthy topics. ART+SCIENCE CONTENT MARKETING 2
  3. 3. ART+SCIENCE CONTENT MARKETING 3 93% of B2B marketers do some form of content marketing, whether they realize it or not (MarketingProfs.com, The State of B2B Content Marketing, 2013). In fact, despite such wide participation in this realm, 56%of firms don’t even have a plan or strategy surrounding content marketing (CMI, 2013). The fact that so many people are participating in content marketing and don’t realize it makes for an interesting conundrum. Is the term too ambiguous? Possibly—but that’s probably because it’s grown from a marketing trend to a way of life. And, like substances and elements, content comes in an ever-growing number of forms, each of which will cause varied reactions with different segments in your target audience. Just as some metals are magnetic, some solutions are viscous and some solids are heavy, different content can be engaging, sticky, weighty—and the intensity of those properties can change depending on the situation. For instance, if you’re sending an engineering technician a witty infographic, she might not react the same way your head buyer might. But, you could transform the same information into a whitepaper and get a more engaged reaction from that engineer. When dealing with content marketing and what it can potentially mean for you, it’s critical to understand all the elements involved—choosing what information to present, what form to put it in, how to push it out to your audiences and so on. Then you can start designing a plan for how to combine elements the right way to ignite reactions with your audience. Get started by learning about the practice at hand: Content marketing is a technique of creating and/or distributing relevant and valuable content to attract, acquire, and engage a clearly defined target audience with the objective of driving action. It’s about: 1. Adding value 2. Providing an incredibly valuable resource 3. Creating more interactive storytelling 4. Presenting information in a variety of ways for a variety of learners Targeting different segments of your audience is as simple as taking your story and telling it in different ways—formats, channels, frequencies—so it sticks. That is what makes up your content strategy. Goal Subject matter Team Creation Audience development
  4. 4. ART+SCIENCE CONTENT MARKETING 4 High Medium-High Medium Low-Medium Low Periodic Table of Content SaSample Print and Online In-person Print Online People Other Actions & initiatives Types of contentContent tactics Stickiness Content weight Element symbol Element name Periodic table of content Combining elements into substance that matters to your target audiences High Medium-High Medium Low-Medium Low Periodic Table of Content SaSample Print and Online In-person Print Online People Other Actions & initiatives Types of contentContent tactics Stickiness Content weight Element symbol Element name
  5. 5. ART+SCIENCE CONTENT MARKETING 5 Sample molecules With B2B marketing, there are plenty of people who can influence purchases, especially when dealing with things that one group manages but everyone uses—IT resources, for example. Even though upper management or procurement may sign the deals, influencers like your everyday “IT guy” and even end users can affect the purchase decision. With different segments of varying levels of technical savvy, you can push content that will speak to all segments and tell your story in different ways: m-High m Medium Content SeSEO/SEM InfInfluencers Online People Other Actions & initiatives Types of content High riodic Table of Content Webcasts /webinars/vodcasts eCardsBlogs Mobile apps /content Sponsored content Gated content Data visualization Segment SeSEO/SEM InfInfluencers Print and Online Print Online People Other Actions & initiatives Types of contentContent tactics ss Content weight High Medium-High Medium Low-Medium Content SeSEO/SEM InfInfluencers Online People Other Actions & initiatives Types of contents Periodic Table of Content Interactive gamesVideos WbWebcasts /webinars/vodcasts Whitepapers eBooksComparison charts eCeCards BgBlogs CsCase studies MbMobile apps /content ScSponsored content GcGated content Custom media User-generated content VisData visualization Editorial calendar SSegment Harvester Th SeSEO/SEM InfInfluencers Forums Print and Online In-person Print Online People Actions & initiatives Types of contentContent tactics Sced content GcGated content tkcontent mm media LocLocalized content UgcUser-generated content VisData visualization EdgEditorial guidelines EdcEditorial calendar SSegment EdEditor HHarvester CtaCall to action ThThought leadership SeSEO/SEM InfInfluencers People Other Actions & initiatives Types of content eriodic Table of Content IgInteractive games VVideos WbWebcasts /webinars/vodcasts eBeBooks eCeCards BgBlogs MbMobile apps /content ScSponsored content GcGated content CmCustom media UgcUser-generated content VisData visualization EdcEditorial calendar SSegment HHarvester ThThought leadership SeSEO/SEM InfInfluencers FmForums on Print People Other Actions & initiatives Types of contentContent tactics Periodic Table of Content Interactive gamesVideos WbWebcasts /webinars/vodcasts eBooksComparison charts eCeCards BgBlogs CsCase studies MbMobile apps /content ScSponsored content GcGated content Custom media User-generated content VisData visualization Editorial calendar SSegment Harvester Thought leadership SeSEO/SEM InfInfluencers Forums Print and Online In-person Print Online People Other Actions & initiatives Types of contentContent tactics Periodic Table of Content WbWebcasts /webinars/vodcasts eCeCards BgBlogs CsCase studies MbMobile apps /content ScSponsored content GcGated content VisData visualization SSegment SeSEO/SEM InfInfluencers Print and Online In-person Print Online People O Actions & initiatives Types of contentContent tactics Stickiness Content weight Periodic Table of Content IgInteractive games VVideos WbWebcasts /webinars/vodcasts WpWhitepapers eBeBooks CcComparison charts eCeCards BgBlogs CsCase studies MbMobile apps /content ScSponsored content GcGated content CmCustom media UgcUser-generated content VisData visualization EdcEditorial calendar SSegme HHarves SeSEO/SEM InInfluenc FmForums In-person Print Actions & initiatives Types of contentContent tactics Periodic Table of Content IngInfographics /video infographics IgInteractive games RtExecutive roundtable VVideos SmSocial media WbWebcasts /webinars/vodcasts WpWhitepapers eBeBooks CcComparison charts eCeCards BgBlogs AcArticles CsCase studies MbMobile apps /content MsMicrosites/portals MgPrint magazines /books ScSponsored content GG StkSticky content CmCustom media LLoc UUs PrPress releases FmForums In-person Print Content tactics High Medium-High Medium Low-Medium odic Table of Content SaSample SeSEO/SEM InfInfluencers Print and Online Print Online People Other Actions & initiatives Types of contentContent tactics Content weight Element symbol Content harvesting begins within the company, using product managers to tell stories about your product. For more convincing data, you can conduct a quiz, poll or study to your key segments and use the findings about their needs to build reports. Now you’ll have some thought leadership on the topic… With your information and stories pulled together, build your editorial calendar, deciding what to push to whom and when. While the story might be the same in many of these elements, some will be more technical or more high-level than others, making them appropriate for each audience. You’ll need to decide on the right order to send them in, thinking about the call to action on each piece—whether everything drives to a single microsite or several, and so on. 1 1 1 11 112 2 223 3 3 3 FACT-PACKED ELEMENTS INTERACTIVE ELEMENTS EDITORIAL ELEMENTS Audience 1: IT influencers Audience 2: IT decision makers Audience 3: end user (non-IT) influencers IT influencers will get the bulk of your content because they understand user needs better and have a tighter knit community than upper management. Periodic Table of Content IgInteractive games VVideos WbWebcasts /webinars/vodcasts WpWhitepapers eBeBooks CcComparison charts eCeCards BgBlogs CsCase studies MbMobile apps /content SSponso CCust FmForums In-person Print Content tactics 3 EXCLUSIVE ELEMENT Goal Subject matter Team Creation Audience development
  6. 6. ART+SCIENCE CONTENT MARKETING 6 Assembling your strategy Goal: What is the goal, the end output for your content marketing strategy? Upsell? Support? Awareness? Team: Who’s going to create, find, manage, respond? Will you utilize guest posters (like industry experts)? Use syndicated content? Create original content? Subject matter: The content you produce should be about your audience’s interests, not about your products. To understand what your customers are interested in, you can engage in social listening or rely on the market research you use to segment your audience for all other initiatives. Creation: At the crux of production should be your editorial calendar, which should specify who is going to create what content, when they will submit it, when you plan to publish it, and where you plan to publish it (your site, Slideshare, industry publications, blogs, etc.). Your editorial calendar should also include the customer personas and buying stages for which the content is intended. Goal Subject matter Team Creation Audience development Audience development: Creating the content is half the battle. The other half is attracting visitors to that content, a process that breaks down into: Influencers (Inf): These are people in your segments who will lead others to the content—guest bloggers, experts, analysts, celebrities and more—who will use their power/social networks to help spread your content. SEO/SEM (SE): Making sure your content shows up in searches on related topics by engaging in good SEO and paying for quality SEM. Syndication: See syndicated content. Goal Subject matter Team Creation Audience development
  7. 7. ART+SCIENCE CONTENT MARKETING 7 Real reactions What to look for Depending on the reaction you want from your audience, choose elements based on their stickiness and level of content, then pair them together in complementary ways. You probably won’t start a fire or cause an explosion like you could with real chemicals—but you can still make a big bang if you do it right. Desired reactions are mapped to marketing objectives like awareness and interest, and some of them can happen before and after purchase (like “share” and “rave”). Goal Subject matter Team Creation Audience development Notice Share Explore Inquire Meet Negotiate Purchase Rave
  8. 8. ART+SCIENCE CONTENT MARKETING 8 Table of content Articles | Ac An article’s potential for creating bonds ranges a great deal. It could be very sticky or very repellent depending on the value, intrigue and interest of the information. Plus, if you gate the article with a password or publish in subscription-based media, you could end up with a lot of customer information. Blogs | Bg While an individual blog post is obviously very short, a lot of work must be put into maintaining the blog, updating content and constantly coming up with new ideas. Stickiness potential is high, but only if content is constantly pushed through. Branded entertainment | Be Short videos, web series, interactive games, eCards and more, all sponsored by a brand. The key with branded entertainment is to focus on the “entertainment” part and let the brand take a back seat. Don’t let your brand take away from the plot, emotion or interest—let the brand enhance those things. Call to action | Cta Of course you know what a call to action is, but when dealing with content marketing, it’s important to note that your calls to action should lead users to more of the story you’re trying to tell, whether it’s an infographic that leads to a web portal which leads to a contact form or an article that leads to a Twitter handle. Case studies | Cs Case studies are very self-promotional, but are also the best way to show what you can do. If they’re done in a matter-of-fact, objective, “not-too-sales-y” way, they will be some of the most valuable content you can push out. Catalogs/magalogs | Cg A catalog turns into a “magalog” when you start adding more articles, tips, lists, quizzes and interviews. It makes your piece more engaging, but is also a lot of work for a piece that is only going to your existing subscriber base. Comparison charts | Cc Like case studies, the content here is powerful because it’s factual and, for the most part, objective. Content harvesting | Ch The process of finding new content, either by finding syndicated content you can use or developing new content. Custom media | Cm The development, production and delivery of media designed to strengthen the relationship between the sponsor and the audience. This is similar to branded entertainment, but it is more brand-forward. In-flight magazines are a great example of this type of content. Data visualization | Vis The study of the visual representation of data—in other words, the process by which we create infographics and other visually-heavy forms of content. eBooks | eB eBooks are the more fun, graphical, chopped up cousin of the whitepaper. Often filled with graphics, charts, factoids and short paragraphs, they’re an easy read, making them highly engaging yet still quite informative. eCards | eC A way to make users feel they are sending user-generated content, eCards sent from your site are low in content but high in viral potential. Editor | Ed Someone who has authority to publish within a channel without needing further approvals, generally following documented and approved editorial guidelines. Editorial calendar | Edc An extremely efficient (and oftentimes necessary, especially when dealing with many different content tactics to many different audience segments) way to control publication of content across diverse media outlets over time. Editorial guidelines | Edg Identification of the types, tone, topics of content to be selected for a given publishing channel. eNewsletters/eZines | eNL Just like blogs, eNewsletters demand constant attention. They definitely require the use of an editorial calendar as well as a cyclical schedule that includes editorial planning, idea harvesting, content creation, layout, publishing, and repurposing of content. Executive roundtable | Rt Credibility is definitely high, but getting people to tune in (and getting executives to participate) may be difficult. Forums | Fm Forums, for the most part, rely on user-generated content. You can learn a lot from customers, but only if you monitor and participate. Gated content | Gc Sometimes your call-to-action drives back to your site. If you “gate” the content behind a signup process, you’ll be able to get valuable data from users who want to access more information from you. Harvester | H Someone who searches, finds and filters the best content on a topic or topics from multiple sources (or commissions the creation of original content). Influencers | Inf These are people in your segments who will lead others to the content—guest bloggers, experts, analysts, celebrities and more—and use their power/ social networks to help spread your content. Infographics/video infographics | Ing Infographics are one of the trendiest forms of content marketing right now, but we don’t think this trend will fade any time soon. Creating fact-based, fun-to-read content is sometimes labor-intensive (and requires more design time than other content tactics), but if you present it well, it can be highly engaging and valuable. Interactive games | Ig Games are very engaging, but require a lot of upfront work and planning. Still, if you can entice people to play and, in the end, understand something new about your brand, you’ll have a highly shareable, spreadable piece. Lists/rankings | Ls People love lists. If you can build one that’s relevant to your brand and manage to publish it, you’ll be able to send a loud, clear, very shareable message. And, if the list or ranking is based on credible research, that’s even better.
  9. 9. ART+SCIENCE CONTENT MARKETING 9 Localized content | Loc To get different audiences to react with different content elements with similar messaging, you need to morph your content into different states. The same goes for content that needs to live in different regions or languages. Transforming content to fit in with the local culture is critical in getting users to find, use and share your message. Microsites/portals | Ms Like articles, the stickiness and content weight of a microsite depends on your plan for it; you could potentially house all of your other content on a web portal and use it as an archive, or you could simply feature short-term information or promotions. Mobile apps/content | Mb Content and functionality specifically meant to be seen and interacted with from a mobile device, whether a website is repurposed for mobile, or an app is created. Podcasts | Pc Audio content meant to draw in users and engage them on a personal, regular level. Press releases | Pr Very traditional, but still a great way to push content and get noticed. Print magazines/books | Mg A lot of work can go into these, but if you’re dedicated to promoting them, they could be beneficial, especially if a book release is accompanied by PR and other web content like blogs. Quizzes/polls | Qz Not necessarily informative content, but quizzes and polls are still brandable messages that can contribute to engagement while giving you important customer information along the way. Research reports | Rr Conducting research or collaborating with analysts or other experts to conduct research can result in reliable, credible content that you’ll want to push out, either as full reports or boiled into short blog posts or exciting infographics. Response manager | Rm Someone who is performing social listening and can respond to blog comments, tweets, and other responses to the content you push out. Roadshows/live events | Rs In-person, sometimes you just need to create a short presentation and a few handouts to get your point across at a live event, but the face-to-face interaction with clients/prospects can send an even stronger message. RSS feeds/web feeds | Rss Aggregators used to publish frequently updated works—blog posts, news headlines, audio and video—in a standardized format. A feed like this is not a type of content but rather an aggregator of content. Segment | S A group of people with common content/solution needs; your audience will probably be divided into multiple segments and different content will be appropriate for each one. SEO/SEM | Se Making sure your content shows up in searches on related topics by engaging in good SEO and paying for quality SEM. Social media | Sm By now, social media content might be a no-brainer. But if you’re creating a plan that includes many other content marketing tactics, it’s important to use social media to promote them and help tie your whole plan together. Sponsored content | Sc Large blogs and frequently-updated sticky sites allow marketers to sponsor content that fits with their tone & voice, a great way to reach a large audience with your content. Check here and here for some examples of sponsored content that fits in seamlessly with the tongue-in-cheek, shareable nature of the “best of the web” blog BuzzFeed. Sticky content | Stk This is content meant to get a user to: return to the site, hold their attention, get them to spend longer periods of time at the site, entice users to share/ spread the content and it should be your goal to make your content as sticky as possible. Syndicated content | Syn Content that has been published and then re-published by others in order to spread the message further. You can either utilize syndicated content to drive volume and credibility of your own publication or you can syndicate your own articles, making them available to others who need more content, thus spreading your own message further. Thought leadership | Th Thought leaders often publish articles and blog posts on trends and topics influencing an industry. To become a thought leader, your content needs to resonate profoundly with your audience. User-generated content | Ugc Often affiliated with sites like Wikipedia, user-generated content (UGC) can actually be part of your content marketing strategy. Whether you allow users to comment on articles, blog posts, etc., or you invite them to create videos, eCards and more as part of a contest, you can use their UGC to help spread your message—or find out what moves them. Videos | V The number one tip for creating video content: don’t create it thinking it will become viral. Just create videos that look good, sound good and deliver the message you’re aiming for. And having all of your video content on one channel will help tell your whole story the same way a web portal or microsite could. Webcasts/webinars/vodcasts | Wb Webinars on valuable topics to your target audiences can be a nice way to softly sell your solutions. Much like infographics, articles and other content, if your webinars are presented as helpful guides, not sales pitches, they’ll get a lot more traction. Whitepapers | Wp Whitepapers are long and content-intensive, but if your products and solutions are technical in nature, they’re a must. If you market to both technical and non-technical audiences, consider creating whitepapers and then boiling them down into eBooks for the non-tech segment.
  10. 10. ART+SCIENCE CONTENT MARKETING pepperglobal.com 2 North LaSalle Street Chicago, IL 60602 Contact Pepper today to learn how we can formulate content for your business. 312.588.4250 northamerica@pepperglobal.com A GLOBAL COMPUTERSHARE COMPANY Brennen Roberts Managing Director Pepper North America ©2014 Pepper North America. The contents of this document are confidential and may not be disclosed to third parties. All content, ideas and tools within the offer are the copyrighted works of Pepper and subject to standard copyright law. Any redistribution or reproduction of any materials herein is subject to approval by Pepper. Some pictures, illustrations and photos may be subject to copyright and trademark rights of third parties. All registered trademarks are the properties of their individual companies and organizations. All brand names are the intellectual property of their owners. All registered trademarks are acknowledged, even if they have not been expressly labeled as such.
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