Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Elegant Simplicity: Bridging the gap between the writer and the reader
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Elegant Simplicity: Bridging the gap between the writer and the reader

2,411
views

Published on

Good writing is simple and elegant - like a well-designed garden. It invites readers to enter, to follow the story, to explore the ideas.

Good writing is simple and elegant - like a well-designed garden. It invites readers to enter, to follow the story, to explore the ideas.

Published in: Business, Travel, Technology

1 Comment
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
2,411
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
12
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
47
Comments
1
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide
  • Simplicity – reduce ideas to their bare essential elementsSignalvs Noise Ratio – avoid cluttering up your presentation with irrelevant information or graphicsContrast – use contrast to emphasize the most important elements
  • Which graph is easier to look at?Correct Answer – Graph BBright colors are great for making important things stand out, but when they’re overused nothing stands out and it becomes more difficult to focus on the data.
  • Which of these two tables is easier to read?Correct Answer – Bottom TableThe grid, fill colors, unnecessary precision, and redundant use of the dollar signs in the top table all distract from the data and make it unnecessarily difficult to read and compare values.
  • Here’s another slide illustrating the same principles.In addition to Simplicity, Signal vs Noise, Contrast
  • Transcript

    • 1. Elegant Simplicity
    • 2. bridging the gap
      between the writer
      and the reader
    • 3. Penny McKinlay
      Communication, Research, Analysis
      Saskatoon, SK, Canada
      penny@axonsoft.com
      http://www.pennymckinlay.axonsoft.com
      www.wanderlustandwords.blogspot.com
    • 4. You wrote it . . .
      . . . but is anyone reading it?
    • 5. Text doesn’t exist in isolation.
      It is part of a page or a computer screen.
      The way the words
      are organized on the page
      affects the way they are perceived.
    • 6. Effective writing is simple and elegant
      – like a well-designed garden.
    • 7. It invites readers
      to enter,
      to follow the story,
      to explore the ideas.
    • 8. Here are three key tools for
      increasing readability:
    • 9. #1 Start a conversation with the reader.
      Invite them to start reading.
    • 10. #2 Eliminate the clutter.
      Make it easy for readers to follow the flow of your story.
    • 11. #3 Highlight the most important information.
      Encourage readers to pause and consider.
    • 12. #1
      Start a conversation
      with the reader
    • 13. Catch the reader’s attention and tell them what to expect.
    • 17. Might be interesting
    • 18. That’s what I’m looking for
    • 19.
    • 20.
    • 21. Include the reader in the conversation.
      – especially their eyes
    • 25. What’s on YOUR travel life list?
    • 26.
    • 27. “faces grab attention,
      are recognized quickly,
      and bypass the usual brain interpreting channels”
    • 28. Here are two versions of a slide.
      The second one does a better job
      of connecting with its audience.
    • 29.
    • 30.
    • 31. #2
      Eliminate the clutter
    • 32. There is way too much “stuff” in this tiny patio garden.
    • 33. Time to clear away some of the clutter.
    • 34. Eliminate unnecessary information.
    • 35. PowerPoint presentations are visual
      - like movies or comics.
    • 36. Boring!
    • 37. Politically incorrect – maybe.
      But very effective.
    • 38. Eliminate unnecessary words.
    • 39. “We'll be working with the UK. The UK are already rolling out the biometrics. What we'll be endeavouring to do is to supplement and value add to that framework that's already in place, those technologies, so that we're not replicating or duplicating them.”Robert McClelland, Australian federal Attorney General
      (weaselwords.com.au)
    • 40. “A solitary
      crow on a bare branch –
      autumn evening”
      Basho
    • 41. Eliminate unnecessary visual effects.
    • 42. So much information – charts, numbers, images, colours. But what is important?
    • 43. Reducing ideas to their essential elements
      highlights the key information.
    • 44. Uncluttered charts are easier to read.
    • 45. Too many bright colours makes it hard to read
      the data and nothing stands out.
    • 46. “Empty space
      can be dynamic and active
      through careful placement
      of positive elements.”
    • 47.
    • 48. #3
      Highlight the
      most important
      information
    • 49. Chunk it and keep it short.
    • 53.
    • 54.
    • 55. Group related information.
    • 56.
    • 57.
    • 58. Prioritize: first things first.
      • Lists are clear and easy to follow.
    • 59.
    • 60. Mexico City Unmasked:
      20 Insider Tips
    • 61. Provide visual cues.
    • 62.
    • 63.
    • 64.
    • 65.
    • 66. Credits
      Slide 14 – Spacing magazine, national issue, Spring 2011
      Slide 15 – The Idiot and the Odyssey, Joel Stratte-McLure (Kindle version)
      Slide 16 – Content Rules, Ann Handley (Kindle version)
      Slide 17 – Fast Company email newsletter
      Slides 18, 53 – The Oprah Magazine, May 2011
      Slides 20, 21, 50 – Travel + Leisure magazine, 2010
      Slide 22 - Susan Weinschenk, 100 Things You Should Know About People: #92, http://www.whatmakesthemclick.net/2011/03/27/100-things-you-should-know-about-people-92-there-is-a-brain-area-dedicated-to-perceiving-faces/
      Slides 22, 46, 54 – Budget Travel magazine, April 2010
      Slides 24, 25, 31, 32, 37, 38, 42, 59 –http://www.slideshare.net/garr/sample-slides-by-garr-reynolds
      Slide 30 – iStockphoto
    • 67. Credits, cont.
      Slides 39, 40 – Graph Design IQ Test, Stephen Few, www.perceptualedge.com
      Slide 41 – Garr Reynolds, Presentation Zen Design
      Slide 45 – Casa Batlló Visual Guide, DosdeArteEdiciones
      Slide 47 – Wanderlust magazine, November 2010
      Slide 49 – Afar magazine, May/June 2011
      Slides 52, 57, 58 – online software documentation, Axon Development Corporation
      Slide 56 –http://www.andyrutledge.com/gestalt-principles-3.php
      Unless otherwise noted, all photographs were taken by Penny McKinlay in Spain.