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Erika Kitzmiller

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9th Annual Penn Urban Doctoral Symposium (2012) …

9th Annual Penn Urban Doctoral Symposium (2012)

The Roots of Educational Inequality: Germantown High School, 1907-2011

Published in: Education, News & Politics

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  • 1. The Roots of Educational Inequality: Germantown High School, 1907-2011 Erika M. Kitzmiller
  • 2. Dr. Anne Mullikin, University of Pennsylvania ‘22 GGermantown High School, Faculty 1922-1959
  • 3. February 2007
  • 4. Germantown High School, 2007
  • 5. The Roots of Educational Inequality• Examines the political, social, and economic factors that contributed to the school’s transformation.• Analyzes daily events rather than key turning points.• Examines how inequalities were produced and how individuals challenged and resisted them.
  • 6. Chapter 1:Campaigningfor a PublicHigh School inthe SuburbanSanctuary,1907 - 1914
  • 7. Chapter 2:Legitimizingthe New HighSchool in anIncreasinglyFracturedCommunity,1914 - 1928
  • 8. Chapter 3:TheFoundationBegins toCrack, 1929-1937
  • 9. Chapter 4:The Rhetoric ofWartime UnityMasksInequality,1938 - 1945
  • 10. Chapter 5:Meeting theNeeds of a“ModernGenerationLiving in aModern Age,”1946 - 1957
  • 11. Chapter 6:UrbanRenewal andRacial Unrest,1958 - 1967
  • 12. Findings• White flight, alone, did not lead to the school’s transformation.• Philadelphia never allocated enough funding for its schools.• Private funding for public schools and charitable organizations.• Educational institutions were sites that both replicated and undermined structural inequalities.
  • 13. Conclusion14