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DCCT – intensive diabetes therapy and glomerular filtration
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DCCT – intensive diabetes therapy and glomerular filtration

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  • 1. DCCT (DIABETES CONTROL AND COMPLICATIONS TRIAL)– INTENSIVE DIABETES THERAPY AND GLOMERULAR FILTRATION RATE IN T1DM CHRIS REDFORD S T 3 , TO R B AY
  • 2. PATIENTS DCCT was a multicenter clinical trial, involving patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus, that examined the effects of intensive diabetes therapy. • 1441 persons with type 1 diabetes randomly assigned to 6.5 years of intensive diabetes therapy or to conventional diabetes therapy (198389). • 1375 participants were followed in the observational Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications (EDIC) study. Serum Crt levels were measured annually throughout the course of the two studies (22 year median follow-up). The trial included two cohorts: • Primary-prevention: diabetes for 1 to 5 years, albumin excretion rate of less than 40 mg per 24 hours, no retinopathy. • Secondary-intervention: diabetes for 1 to 15 years, albumin excretion rate of 200 mg or less per 24 hours and at least one microaneurysm in either eye.
  • 3. INTERVENTION 6.5 years of intensive therapy vs conventional: • Intensive therapy - three or more injections of insulin daily or the use of an insulin pump, with the aim of achieving a HbAlc level of less than 6.05%. • Conventional therapy - prevention of symptoms of hyperglycaemia and hypoglycaemia with the use of one or two injections of insulin daily.
  • 4. COMPARISON
  • 5. OUTCOME • Over a median follow-up period of 22 years in the combined studies, impairment of the GFR developed in 24 participants assigned to intensive therapy and in 46 assigned to conventional therapy (risk reduction with intensive therapy, 50%; 95% confidence interval, 18 to 69; P = 0.006). • The cumulative incidence of an impaired GFR 20 years after randomization was 2.0% among participants who had been assigned to intensive therapy and 5.5% among participants who had been assigned to conventional therapy, representing an absolute difference in risk of 3.5%. • Intensive therapy reduced the risk of the composite outcome of an impaired GFR or death by 37% (95% CI, 10 to 55; P = 0.01). • Among these participants, end-stage renal disease developed in 8 participants in the intensive-therapy group and in 16 in the conventional therapy group. • As compared with conventional therapy, intensive therapy was associated with a reduction in the mean estimated GFR of 1.7 ml per minute per 1.73 m2 during the DCCT study but during the EDIC study was associated with a slower rate of reduction in the GFR and an increase in the mean estimated GFR of 2.5 ml per minute per 1.73 m2 (P<0.001 for both comparisons). • The beneficial effect of intensive therapy on the risk of an impaired GFR was fully attenuated after adjustment for HbA1c levels or albumin excretion rates.

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